TYNI TYNI – Cherry Trees

“Everybody has different characters within them,” says 21-year-old star in the making Tyni of the multi-faceted persona she adopts on stage, on record and everywhere in between.
“It all comes down to whether or not you choose to bring them out.”
Tyni describes her music as being “like jumping into my very own Wonderland where each song’s a different chapter of my very own fairytale”, and three new chapters form the Fighter EP, whose atmospheric, glitchy title track has been remixed by Frank Ocean collaborator Troy Noka and sits alongside XCX-ecque synth banger ‘Touch Me’ and the elegantly sparse ‘Cherrytrees’. These songs are the result of Tyni having spent the last few years between LA, London and her hometown of Sheffield, recording with the likes of Wayne Wilkins (Beyoncé, Jordin Sparks), MNEK (Madonna, Little Mix) and Britney collaborator Ana Diaz, all of whom have provided the perfect foil for Tyni’s nuanced balance of style and substance.
Tyni grew up in Woodhouse, a small village just outside Sheffield, which her pharmacist mum, gas man dad, and elder sister. “It’s a proper English village,” she laughs. “There are still stocks there from when they used to throw tomatoes.” School was hard work, as school often is – her secondary school, she estimates, is possibly the worst-behaved in Sheffield. It was there, without ever really having felt like an outsider, that she became fascinated by the divide that was starting to appear between her own outlook and those of her peers. “Well, to be blunt, some girls wanted to beat me up,” she says. “Was it the fact that I had a unicorn on my bag? I don’t know. I wasn’t quite like everybody else.”
Rather than withdraw into herself or conform to fit in, Tyni’s reaction – and you can hear this steadfastness in her music – was to just get on with her life. Mind you, some of her decisions were a little on the outré side. “For my prom, I wanted to turn up in a funeral hearse,” she laughs. “My friends were like, ‘this is disrespectful’. I said, ‘well, it’s different’.”
She didn’t get the hearse, but she’s making up for lost time now and it feels like the space between a mid-teen Tyni and her more conservative friends is the space where the Tyni we see before us today, a ready-formed pop superstar, started to grow. She talks animatedly
(and with an authority rare in artists so young) about heroes whose images and music she admires: Farrokh Bulsara as Freddie Mercury, Stefani Germanotta as Lady Gaga, David Jones as David Bowie as Ziggy Stardust. All artists whose music is authentic and honest, but who also put on one hell of a show to bring it to life. Tyni’s own persona, she explains, is “an artist having a love affair with her music, which means more to her than any other relationship could. And that’s just how it is. It’s the way it’s always been”.
By the age of 14 Tyni signed up at Sheffield’s Joy Reynolds theatre school. Her journey to where she finds herself today began with a chanced-upon advert in The Stage which eventually led to a music industry showcase themed around the films Halloween (“you’ve
got to admire Michael Myers for his determination”) and The Grudge. “I crawled out onto the stage,” she remembers, “then there was a Blair Witchy bit where the light would flash on and I’d be in one place; flash off then flash on again and I’d be somewhere else. Then it stopped and all these label people were just sitting there going, ‘er…’. They looked quite scared.” But one audience member was impressed enough to introduce Tyni to Wayne Wilkins, the award-winning writer and producer behind hits for the likes of Beyoncé and Natasha Bedingfield. “He came to London – we had a meeting, and he was like, ‘well, you could come to my studio in LA…’,” Tyni recalls. “I’d never been to America before but a few weeks later there I was in Santa Monica. We worked from midday to 4am every day. I never got tired, I was just thriving on pure adrenaline.” Their union brought out the best in both parties, Wilkins’ ear for a hit and studio knowhow bringing a real ready-for-radio sheen to Tyni’s extravagant, colourful pop.
Before long Tyni’s unicorn bag was stuffed with enough innovative pop songs to establish her as an exciting, innovative new artist. With college out of the way she could look ahead to new challenges, continuing to work with Wayne Wilkins while adding to the mix the likes of MNEK and Ana Diaz, and dividing her time between LA, London and Sheffield. During this time she decided to go by the name Tyni as a nod to her dyslexia and as a constant reminder that, in her own words, “despite the challenges I may face, I can still try achieve whatever I want”. She also experienced heartbreak for the first time, which became part of the inspiration for ‘Fighter’. “Sometimes your own mind is the worst place you can be,” Tyni declares. “But everybody’s got a fight within them. Whether it’s on a huge global scale or just inside your own home, people fight for something they believe in every day of their lives.”
For the eye-popping ‘Fighter’ video, Tyni recruited Charlotte Rutherford, whose portfolio includes the likes of Charli XCX, Marina & The Diamonds and Perfume Genius. “I was imagining trashy glam — something halfway between Quentin Tarantino and Christina’s
‘Dirrrty’ video,” Tyni explains. “I wanted to channel my inner Beatrix Kiddo because she’s the ultimate badass bitch. Charlotte and I were instantly on the same page, so it was fun bringing our ideas to life.”
For Tyni, bringing ideas to life is what this is all about — and you’ll rarely find a pop artist bursting with quite so much life. “Everybody’s split down the middle,” she states. “Everybody has two sides. One side is always more flamboyant. And my flamboyant side is just the way I want to be all the time.”
So if you’re wondering where all pop’s big personalities have gone, Tyni may provide a clue — or several. “It’s fun to be different people,” she smiles. “Who’d want to be themselves all the time?”

http://www.tyni.world/

Marko Penn, Lil Dicky – Dirty Work

Marko Penn is a Multi-Genre singer/songwriter/producer whose work alternates between the soul-rooted mode of John Legend and the slicker pleasure-seeking likes of Jeremih and Ty Dolla $ign. Active since the mid-2010s with singles such as “Options,” “Started from the Mud,” and “Favors,” Penn has reached additional listeners with guest appearances on tracks by League of Starz (“Throw It Back”), and Illy (“You Say When”). More prominently, he and Janine performed the duet “Firebird” for The Birth of a Nation: The Inspired By Album, and he worked with B.o.B on the single “Roll Up.” In 2017, Penn released the singles “Friends” and “B2L” (featuring Gucci Mane), as well as the album Dirty Work, featuring Lil Dicky on the title track. Marko recently released lyric video for “Dirty Work” which postively shows the hard working woman in different scenarios. It’s a very colorful visual and it embodies a retro vibe mixed with modern day situations to go along with a catchy tune that you just can’t get out head. 

Melodic groove – Unstoppable

Her experiences honed her artistry on a world stage filled with culture while traveling with her missionary father to several countries including her mother’s homeland of Ghana in West Africa. Their journeys not only deeply impacted Myshel’s appreciation for diversity, but shaped her perspective as a singer and songwriter. “Singing in different countries clearly revealed to me the transcending power of music. The faces of people from different walks of life, confirm that music speaks a universal language that is deeply felt, believed and embraced. It is an honor to be gifted with such a powerful means of expression. It must be used responsibly.”

Myshel has played a supporting role to many household names. She’s toured and sung background for R&B singers Kelly Price and Tamia Hill as well as Stacy Orrico, Don Moen, Matthew West and Grammy Award winning artist Toby Mac, and Mandisa. The years spent in the background taught her many incredible lessons on what it really means to be a servant leader. Cece Winans, her mentor, shared her secret of success. “The way up is down. Stay humble, stay grateful and stay connected to the Lord!”

Myshel knows that her gift and purpose work hand and hand. Both working for something far greater than herself.

The multi-talented Kentucky native also uses her past platforms as former queen of Tennessee State University and former “Miss National Black Hall of Fame” to speak around the country inspiring women to look beyond the surface to the radiant queen inside of themselves. Whether she is singing or speaking, Myshel’s greatest joy is inspiring people to dream big and be totally unstoppable against all odds!

ONE ON ONE WITH AERIEL

Tell us your real name, country of birth, and childhood experience.

My name is Aeriel and from Los Angeles, CA. I took an interest to performing at a young age and at that time I was developing my craft by taking lessons and performing in local theater and talent shows. It wasn’t until around 13 when I asked for my first production software that I started writing and creating originals. At that time, I didn’t know anyone who did music, so it really just stemmed from me desperately wanting to create and taking it into my own hands. But at that age, I just wasn’t confident enough to put myself out there.

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Tell us how you start your music career, musical background, experience and skills.

Musically, like many artists I started singing in the church and from then on branched out into local talent showcases and musical theatre. Those avenues really helped me develop a sense of stage presence and confidence, but when you constantly perform others material it can be hard to find an artistic identity. I wasn’t until college when I was about to play and experiment with different sounds to start figuring out who I am as an artist.

I actually started my professional music career behind the scenes. My goal has always been to be an artist; however there was so much I needed to learn to make that a reality. In college I interned for production companies and larger labels like Warner Music and also worked in the industry after college. It taught me a lot about how the industry works so when I started creating my own content, I could apply what I learned to my own art.

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 Tell us about your genre, concept and idea behind your music video and the song.

I wrote be “Be Down” after getting out of a not so great relationship that mentally I knew wouldn’t work, but emotionally I was still tied to the relationship. It left me feeling frustrated with the whole dating scene. After I vented to my friends, and saw they felt the same way, I was inspired to write the song. I am a R&B/Pop artist so when making the track we made sure to include classic R&B sounds like the rhodes and gospel chords, but made it modern by including keybass, electronic drums and samples.

The concept for the video came together when I met with the director, Lex J, and explained to him the reasoning behind the song and my vision. I really wanted something that was true to my life growing up and living in LA. He was able to take the concept and run with it. He’s very great at what he does.

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Tell us everything that we need to know about you as a musician and the ups and downs you have faced in the music business.

The most important thing to know about me as an artist is that the musical integrity and experience for the listeners/audience will always come over anything else. I have a long road ahead of me as I gain more fans and receive more exposure to fully craft my sound and find what resonates well with my audience, but learning and continuous growth is my number one focus. As far as up and downs go every artist gets so many “no’s” before they get the right “yes” and it can be so easy to focus on the “no’s” and the negativity. But for every no I’ve gotten, I’ve also gotten a “yes” from a new fan or an inspiring message to keep pushing from someone I admire to keep pushing and stay focused on that has made a world of difference.

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Tell us how long you have been in the music industry, your experience and your future goal.

I’ve been a part of the music industry in some capacity for at least 6 years. I’ve done everything from interning and being the office coffee runner, to background singing and corporate singing which is a different experience from many artists. My future goal is to be able to take those experiences and use them to not only uplift myself and my art to bigger platforms, but also help and educate other artists.

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Tell us what inspires you to write, compose and sing.

I’m inspired by so many things, but mainly my experiences and the experiences of those around me. I think sometimes it’s easy to think that we are the only one going through certain situations or struggles because as a society, there are many subjects we still are not very open about if we think it will portray us in a negative light or make us look weak. But once you start opening up you’d be surprised at how many people can relate to your story. That’s why I’m inspired by and write about everyday struggles and events because you never really know who you can help.

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Tell us the secret behind making a hit song.

I’m just starting out so I think it would be foolish to assume that I know that lol. But it seems to be that the songs that turn into hits are those that can both move you musically and are authentic and relatable enough to make you feel it lyrically as well. And hopefully one day I will have a better answer from experience lol.

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Tell us the message you will like to pass to your fans out there.

I hope my music would inspire people to be authentic to themselves, and to not be afraid to admit what they want and go after it. I think we’ve gotten to a point where it’s become trendy to “not care” or “have no feelings”, and at a certain point it really can be counterproductive. The number one charge I gave to myself when writing was not be afraid of owning how I feel and I hope that’s something listeners pick up on and practice in their own lives, because truthfully, anyone who invalidates your feelings and aspirations isn’t worth keeping around anyway.

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Tell the kind of advice you will give to an upcoming artist.

The advice that I will give to an upcoming artist is that persistence is the key to success. There’s so much talent in the world and it can be overwhelming to attempt be heard, but you have to keep in mind that all big artists are only where they are because they kept pushing. I’m definitely not anywhere near where I want to be, but I’ve already found it to be so true.

Weak But Strong – Killen Burgess

Killen Burgess is a talented songwriter inspired and tutored into songwriting by his girlfriend. He is the CEO of VLD Songwriting Agency, a company owned by his girlfriend.
“I am going to continue writing music and enjoy this hidden talent I discovered” – Killen Burgess

WØLVES – Animal

From the heart of downtown Los Angeles, Marc Avery, Sean Carney, and Rockwell Sands came together in the fall of 2016 to form what they thought “the ultimate project” would be: a band with pop sensibilities that married urban and rock music into one unique sound.

“We wondered what it would be like if we took all these different influences we loved—artists like Michael Jackson, the Eagles, Coldplay—and rolled them all into one band today,” Sands muses. Their eclectic influences proved to be inspirational: the first song the trio wrote and produced together was the gigantic-sounding “Animal,” and WØLVES was officially born.

“Wolves are majestic creatures that are bonded by an innate sense of the pack, moving in harmony as one unit towards common goals,” Avery remarks when asked about the band. “I can’t think of a better way to describe us. The three of us are all about the good of the group; every day we try to embody that philosophy in our music and beyond.”

From the primal energy of “Animal” to the hopeful emotion in their song “Hold on for the Night,” WØLVES have crafted a wildly diverse range of music built for pop radio and stadiums alike. The trio hopes to inspire audiences across the globe with their music, and to continue creating unforgettable songs that at once nod to the past and hurtle towards the future.

https://www.instagram.com/thebandwolves/

YAYA – In my body

https://soundcloud.com/theyayamusic/in-my-body

YAYA is a project created by Caroline Ljungström – a girl who got tired of waiting. After a long time and many attempts to work with different songwriters and producers without finding her sound, she decided to do everything herself. At the same time she was offered to be a trainee at the studio ”Gottefar”, where Magnus Lidehäll, Salem Al Fakir and Vincent Pontare acted as mentors. There a whole new world of sound, inspiration and opportunities opened up – YAYA was born.

    – It took me many hours just to learn how to find the right drum or how to EQ a base. Slowly but surely things fell into place and my own sound could be created, says YAYA.

Music has always been important in YAYA’s life, especially when combined with dance. At the age of eleven, she joined the Swedish Ballet School in Gothenburg and has since studied and danced in prestigious schools as the Royal Swedish Ballet School and the London Studio Centre.

Getting older YAYA began to see new possibilities in music and developed her interest in writing music and today – YAYA writes and produces music for herself and others. A perfect combination, as the love for producing is great and she wants to develop and work both individually and together with others. She shares a studio with FELIN and Agnes Carlsson in Stockholm in the same studio-complex where she was a trainee for Magnus and co, where also Sebastian Ingrosso, Carli Löf, Seinabo and Axwell are working. There, YAYA and FELIN work in parallel with their own projects, but also as a duo when they work with and for other artists.

The ballet is still a great inspiration to her visual expression. The music is straight and honest, but even if the lyrics can be heavy, there is always a sense of hope. She has created a pop world where nothing is impossible – however, fully aware of that it takes hard work and many tears to get there.

YAYA combines her songwriting and producing with DJing. When she felt that too many nights out were characterized by only guys playing the music, she took matters into her own hands and started playing at the Stockholm clubs. Not to mention festivals like ”Into the Valley” and ”Way out West”.

JACQ – Waiting For You

Originally from Minnesota, Jacqueline Jaquez aka JACQ is a Dallas-based singer, songwriter and performer. Her music has been featured on MTV, Billboard Top 20, Spotify Top 50, DJmag and garnered support from BBC Radio 1, KISS FM (UK) and numerous North American radio stations. She has worked with Grammy nominated award-winning producer/artists Bobby Z, Tony Williams, Frankie J, Gene Evaro and released records with Sony, Ultra and Armada music.

Singing and composing from a young age, JACQ was born to be in music. Her unique voice, captivating performance and artistic versatility have gained her praise by both industry insiders and fans around the world. She has shared the stage with the Seratones, Castro (the band), Shiny Toy Guns, Pretty Lights, Krewella and Passion Pit. A true talent no matter the format, JACQ has sung on wide-ranging music including pop, electronic, hip-hop, rock and dance. In her words – No cliques, all genres.