Tell us your real names, country of birth, date of birth and childhood experience.

Greg Owens, United States, 6-26-1986. I grew up in a small rural town in West TN where everyone tried to talk you into coming to their church and everyone knew your business. While, I never plan on returning to my hometown for any amount of time I had a pretty good childhood. Largely due to my awesome family (both parents at home, 2 older brothers, and 1 older sister).

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Tell us about your music career, your band name, musical background, experience and skills.

I got my first guitar when I was 10 (I’m 31 now) and immediately started writing songs. I wanted to be Billy Corgan of the Smashing Pumpkins. I started playing in hole in the wall bars in West TN when I was 16. In college, basically partying took precedence over anything else, so while I was still playing and writing music I never put in the work that the music deserved. However, I did discover Ryan Adams in college and he kind of replaced Billy Corgan as an artist I really connected with. After struggling a find a decent job following college I finally found a job that I liked as well as a great woman. However, something was still missing. This is when I decided I had to go back to music and put in the effort this time. I perform under the name “Greg Owens and the Whiskey Weather”. The “whiskey weather” refers to the fall when the air starts to cool and the leaves begin to change. I’ve always felt more creative during this period. It also refers to my struggles with anxiety and depression in the past. All of that is a part of me and music helped to get me through it. 

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Tell us about your genre, concept and idea behind your music video and the song.

The genre is Americana. Probably leaning a little more towards rock if you were to listen to the rest of the songs that will be on my forthcoming EP. The song is about trying to figure out how to grow up and grow out of old habits, all while the past is so much easier to just give in to and repeat. So, the demon in the video represents the past catching up with me. We wanted it to have a ’90s music video vibe. All those videos were kinda weird and a bit ambiguous. 

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Tell us everything that we need to know about you as a musician and the ups and downs you have faced in the music business.

Aside from what I’ve already mentioned, being an artist in Nashville is both a blessing and a curse. While its an amazing city with amazing players available to play on your record, there’s so much competition. Everyone is so damn good! It’s easy to get down on yourself. The indie music community here is great though! Very collaborative and helpful for newcomers. Also, I’m my own manager, booker, publicist, and label. Its a ton of work considering I also have a pretty demanding day job, that without, I wouldn’t have been able to afford to make such an awesome video. 

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Tell us about other members of your band, music producer, crew or music video director, how the song was recorded and how the music video was shot.

My producer was Jon Estes. He’s played with everybody from John Paul White to most recently Ke$ha. We hit it off immediately when we bonded over our love for the Ryan Adams album Cold Roses. He really helped me make the song more concise and ultimately more effective. We recorded to tape at the Bomb Shelter Studio in East Nashville. The Bomb Shelter’s claim to fame is that the Alabama Shakes’ debut album, Boys and Girls, was recorded there. They’ve had a ton of great artists record there since though. A company called Bolo Brothers Creative wrote and created the video for me. The director, Jared Rauso, is a friend of mine and we used to play music together in college. He had the vision for the video everyone came together to bring it to fruition. We shot the video here in Nashville at an abandoned house and the surrounding woods. The house used to belong to Hank III and it was obvious that place had seen some debauchery. We shout in mid August so it was hot as hell outside but we had a great time. Aside from the opening scene, it was all shot in one 12 hour day.

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Tell us how long you have been in the music industry, your experience and your future goal.

Like I said previously, I’ve been playing in bars since I was 16, but this is the first time in my life that I’m really immersing myself in a career in music. I don’t think I had the drive or focus to be successful when I was younger. So, I guess you could say this is my debut single although I’ve been cultivating my talents since I was just a kid. Ultimately, I just want to be able to make a comfortable living playing my original music. I’m not looking to make millions (although that’d be nice!)

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Tell us what inspires you to write, compose and sing.

I write a lot about my personal life. It’s therapy for me. It helps to not only get me through hard times but also to more fully understand the emotions that I’m feeling. Its very cathartic. 

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Tell us the secret behind making a hit song.

I recently heard Mary Gauthier talk at a music conference. She said that if you can write a song that touches people’s heart, they will give you money. I strongly agree with her. Ultimately, your audience wants to connect with you. We all want to know that someone else is going through the same storm we are. The best way I know how to connect with people is to write about my own experiences and tribulations and hope that someone out there can relate. One of the greatest compliments I’ve ever gotten is when I was in my early 20s I recorded a little 3 song EP in my bedroom. It was terrible quality, and in retrospect, not the best songs. My mom had a coworker whose kid heard the songs though. The kid told his mom that the songs had got him through some really tough times. Knowing that I had helped someone get through tough times solely through music gave me an indescribable feeling. At that time I had no idea my music could have an effect on someone like that. 

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Tell us the message you will like to pass to your fans out there.

You’re not alone. 

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Tell the kind of advice you will give to an upcoming artist.

I’d say to make sure that you remember that it’s called the Music Business. It’s a business and should be treated as such! Stay organized. Spread sheets are your friends. Be easy to work with and always tell people thank you. 

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Elaborate on your music careers, albums, songs, tours, recognition or awards you might have obtained.

“Five Years From 21” is the first single off of my forthcoming EP, You Can’t Change the Man. Tentative release date is January 20th, 2018. 

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List Radio or TV Stations that are airing your songs and blogs that have featured you as well and send message to them via this platform.

The video was premiered by an Australian blog called Music Injection. You can read the article at: https://musicinjection.com.au/2017/10/21/proud-to-premier-greg-owens-and-the-whiskey-weathers-five-years-from-21/

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Tell us how you write your lyrics, compose, sing and record in the studio.

Sometimes the lyrics come first and sometimes I’ll be strumming a chord progression on my guitar and that will inspire lyrics. I almost exclusively right on my acoustic guitar. For this record, I demoed the songs at a friend’s home studio then brought them to my producer and we talked about any changes that we might make. In the studio we also got input from the other musicians and adjusted the song accordingly. We were tracking to tape so you really want live takes. Rhythm guitar, bass, and drums were all tracked live then we did overdubs for vocals, keys, and other guitar parts.

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Name five biggest artists that you like.

Ryan Adams, Jason Isbell, Sturgill Simpson, Billy Corgan, Jerry Cantrell and the rest of Alice In Chains.

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Name the artists you have collaborated with before in your songs or artists you are willing to collaborate with in the future if you have the chance to do so.

Both my producer, Jon Estes and the guy who played pedal steel on the record, Spencer Cullum, play in a band called Steelism. They’re making some pretty big waves and have been making great instrumental music for several years. I’m open to collaborating with just about anyone that’ll have me!

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Give us the links to your website and your entire social network.

EPK:

https://gregowensmusic.com/ press-kit

Website and socials:

http://www.GregOwensMusic.com

                                

https://www.facebook.com/ gregowensmusic/

                               

https://www.instagram.com/ gregowensmusic/

https://twitter.com/ WhiskeyWeather

                                

https://open.spotify.com/artist/2MPe8xDFLc4zSWWiFYW1Mb

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Give us the links to your various stores for fans to buy your music.

https://gregowensandthewhiskeyweather.hearnow.com

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Tell us about your happiest day and saddest day.

My happiest day may have been the day when my mom told me what that her coworker’s child had said that my music helped him get through some tough times. Saddest day – Well 3 months ago, my dad had a massive stroke. That was a really tough day. 

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Tell us how you will spend a million dollars.

If I ever see a million dollars I will absolutely be giving some of it to my parents. They’ve always been super supportive and there’s no telling how much money they spent over the years buying me music gear. I’d also have to give a little to charity, because well, karma. haha The rest would be spent on helping me build a life for me and my girlfriend. Nashville is getting more expensive by the day!

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