Tell us your real names, country of birth, date of birth and childhood experience.

My full name is Andrew Machum and I’m from Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. I was born on the 8th of June, 1996. I grew up in Halifax with my parents and siblings, and I have been singing and performing since I was in elementary school. I gave my first public performance in the 4th grade when I sang Hallelujah in a local church, with my school’s choir singing behind me. I have been singing since before I can remember, and I picked up the piano at the age of 8. When I was 14, I began posting cover videos of popular songs on YouTube and acquired a small fan base, which motivated me to begin taking my musical endeavors more seriously and ultimately pushed me towards choosing to pursue music as a career. At the age of 15, I took part in a National, televised singing competition for kids aged 15 and below (YTV’s “The Next Star”), and reached the top 16 round. All that aside, however, I simply love music and I always have.

.

.

.

Tell us about your music career, band name, musical background, experience and skills.

I work primarily as a solo artist, but I have a group of talented musicians who I regularly work with, most of whom I met during my time at Berklee College of Music in Boston. I also frequently collaborate with an extremely skilled jazz guitarist from Halifax named Aram Al-Afif, who is also one of my greatest friends. When I was in my early teens, I began performing at corporate and charitable events around Nova Scotia. Around the same time, I was working to create content for my YouTube Channel, and learning some things about recording and producing music along the way. This path eventually led me to studying Music Production and Engineering at Berklee, and after that, moving to Los Angeles where I currently live.

.

.

.

Tell us about your genre, concept and idea behind your music video and the song.

I consider myself to be a jazz-pop artist when it comes to my original work, but I am also a performing jazz singer. “Blue Dreams” is essentially retelling the thoughts that I had during a particularly reflective time; I had recently decided to move to California which complicated some of the relationships in my life. Knowing that some of the things I had grown accustomed to over the years were soon coming to an end put me in a fairly emotional state, and creating this song was my way of expressing the thoughts I’d been having.

.

.

.

Tell us everything that we need to know about you as a musician and the ups and downs you have faced in the music business.

I favor artistic depth and compelling musical interpretation above all else. I believe that skill is essential to creating good music, but  I feel that emotional content and honesty are equally as important. I have sung for many hours every single day for as long as I can remember so that I can express myself with intention and precision without having to think about it; I believe this allows me to let my emotions flow more naturally, as the technical aspects of singing are second nature to me. In the music business, I have certainly learned that progress is not a straight line. When I was a young teenager posting pop covers, my videos and releases generally received much more attention than they do today, as a more jazzy musician and young adult. I feel that, during the time that’s passed, I have progressed immensely as a singer and artist, but moving away from commercial styles has hurt me in some ways.
.

.

.

Tell us about other members of your band, music producer, crew or music video director, how the song was recorded and how the music video was shot.

The other musicians on “Blue Dreams” are friends of mine that I have played and performed with often. The bassist and drummer, Luke Bergamini and Frank Radochia, were the other two members of a trio I formed while attending Berklee. The acoustic guitar was played by Gray Trainer, another fellow Berklee student and friend, and the lead guitar was played by my good friend Aram Al-Afif, from Halifax. I produced, arranged, and mixed the song myself, and I worked with a talented engineer named Victoria Seagriff during the recording stage, who is currently based in New York. Sound quality is extremely important to me – I think each element of the arrangement should be represented as naturally as possible so that the performance can come through clearly – so we recorded and mixed the tracks with high-quality analog gear at 96kHz. The bassist, drummer and I (at the piano) recorded the basic tracks live in the same room to make sure that the foundation of the arrangement was cohesive, and the rest was recorded as overdubs. As of yet, there is no music video for the song.

.

.

.

Tell us how long you have been in the music industry, your experience and your future goal.

I have been in the music industry on a part-time basis for about 8 years, while completing my education. Most of my work has been on the east coast of Canada. Now that I am living in LA, I am seeing the music industry from a much more direct perspective and I am essentially just diving into the real stuff. My ultimate goal is to be a touring and recording musician and to earn a living through doing what I love most: creating music.

.

.

.

Tell us what inspires you to write, compose and sing.

I find that I am certainly inspired by different things at different times, but the reasons are primarily emotional. I find that my song writing is the strongest when there is something that I need to express, something that is weighing on my mind. I feel that truth is an important aspect within all forms of art, so when I feel I have something truthful and compelling to say, I use those feelings as fuel to create the best piece of art that I can. When I sing, it is a somewhat different story because the act of singing itself makes me emotional. I think that after singing so often to express the emotions that I already felt, my mind has made a connection between singing and emotion, such that the act of singing brings me to a place where deep emotion becomes more accessible to me.

.

.

.

Tell us the secret behind making a hit song.

If I knew the secret behind making a hit song, I would have one (haha!). My opinion of what makes for a good hit, however, is that it can be enjoyed, understood, and related to by a wide range of people and that it sounds as if substantial care and passion went into making it.

.

.

.

Tell us the message you will like to pass to your fans out there.

I could absolutely never do what I do without you. I appreciate your interest in my work more than I could possibly explain and I will always ensure that the music I create is meaningful and true.

.

.

.

Tell the kind of advice you will give to an upcoming artist.

The advice I would give to an another upcoming artist (also being one myself) would be the following: a true artist always knows WHY he or she is doing something, and if you can be intentional in all aspects of the creation process, you will truly have control over the music you want to make.

.

.

.

Elaborate on your music careers, albums, songs, tours, recognition or awards you might have obtained.

This is my debut original EP, but I have several collections of covers that I released on iTunes after posting them to YouTube. When I was younger, I was very focused on interpreting other people’s work. My earlier covers are mainly of Top 40 songs: many songs by Bruno Mars, Adele, One Republic, and other such artists. As a teenager in Halifax, I would frequently participate in musical competitions (Nova Scotia’s Kiwanis Music Festival) and I have won several categories for Jazz and Musical Theatre performance (I came second in the Musical Theatre category at the provincial level). I have received several scholarships from the Nova Scotia Talent Trust, who have been incredibly supportive of me over the years. In 2014 and 2015, I received the Nova Scotia Talent Trust “Chico Berardi Award”, for excellence in the field of Jazz and Contemporary Music. At Berklee College of Music, I received the “Outstanding Achievement Award” from the Voice Department.

.

.

.

List Radio or TV Stations that are airing your songs and blogs that have featured you as well and send message to them via this platform.

As of this early point in the history of “Blue Dreams”, I am unaware of any blog coverage or radio play – that will soon change!

.

.

.

Tell us how you write your lyrics, compose, sing and record in the studio.

I compose starting from the melody. Generally, I find a melodic line will form in my head or while I’m singing to myself, and I’ll begin by recording that into my voice memos. From here, I begin discovering simultaneously how this melody makes me feel and how it could exist within the context of a complete song. So, I usually build the song’s melody and chords around a single melodic line. In the case of “Blue Dreams”, the line that started it all was the melody of the lines “Take me through the time that’s passed” and “That read, you and the stars above”, etc. With this song, I actually composed the chord progression beforehand, and the melody and lyrics stemmed from that line (which was originally written on the guitar by my friend Aram Al-Afif). When I record, I try to put myself in a state of mind where I feel both calm and emotional: dim the lights, only a few people in the room at most, and so on. I want to be in a position where I can allow myself to be vulnerable. I try to think deeply about the events that caused me to write the song; the more painful, the more honest. I also warm up my voice extensively ahead of time, of course.

.

.

.

Name five biggest artists that you like.

This will be a strange combination. My jazz side comes from a love for the music of Bill Evans and Chet Baker, both absolute masters of their music and of emotional expression. I also absolutely love Bon Iver because his music sounds like nothing else I’ve heard, yet it is incredibly cohesive and honest. Steely Dan is another favorite of mine because of their clever lyrics, well constructed songs, excellent performances and superior sound quality. My other favorite would be Joni Mitchell, simply because she is absolutely amazing.

.

.

.

Name the artists you have collaborated with before in your songs or artists you are willing to collaborate with in the future if you have the chance to do so.

I have collaborated in the past with Phoenix Lazare; who I met at Berklee, Jackie Foster of Self Portraits, Noa Vlessing and Maya Read. Most of these are people I know and who’s music I respect deeply. There are many, many artists that I would love to collaborate with, but I will name a few that would be truly exciting for me: YEBBA, Thirdstory, Lianne La Havas, and Allen Stone.

.

.

.

Give us the links to your website and your entire social network.

www.andrewmachum.com

www.youtube.com/drewgeoffrey

www.facebook.com/amachum

www.instagram.com/amachum

.

.

.

Give us the links to your various stores for fans to buy your music.

https://open.spotify.com/album/3g91NxazB7GML6tjSTxAOC

https://tidal.com/album/80702834

https://itunes.apple.com/ca/album/west-single/1305205478

https://itunes.apple.com/ca/album/west-single/1305205478

.

.

.

Tell us about your happiest day and saddest day.

My happiest day was the day I met the woman that I love, and my saddest was the day I said goodbye to her. References to both of these days appear all throughout my EP, “WEST”, which “Blue Dreams” represents one third of.

.

.

.

Tell us how you will spend a million dollars.

I would spend a million dollars in service of making myself a totally independent artist. I would build a small recording studio and use the rest of the money to sustain my artistic endeavors.


Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

SIGN INTO YOUR ACCOUNT CREATE NEW ACCOUNT

 
×
CREATE ACCOUNT ALREADY HAVE AN ACCOUNT?
 
×
FORGOT YOUR DETAILS?
×

Go up