Tell us your real names, country of birth, date of birth and childhood experience. 

Ison Van Winkle, Mari Brossfield, Jacob Gutierrez, Ross Murakami. We were all born in the US. 

Ison: I come from parents both engrained in the finance and business worlds for the majority of their lives. With that background, they’ve taught both my sister and I the sometimes cold-hearted truth of the world and were simultaneously models that you can always make the most out of your life, no matter where you start out.

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Tell us about your music career, your band name, musical background, experience and skills.

Ison: Our career in music is still very much in it’s infancy, even with our certain level of success. And no matter how much our success grows into the future, we will always be in a state of exploration and growth. That never ends. 

The band name simply came out of saying that was used instead of cussing. So instead of saying “Oh, you fuckers!” we would say, “Oh, you YIP YOPS!”. And after using it for a few shows, it just stuck.

Overall, the band members’ musical backgrounds start the same as most. We listened to bands that our parents would play in the car or as background music, varying from bands such as Pink Floyd to Prince to Metallica.  Today, our musical tastes are so in line with each other, but at the same time, so diverse. Personally, as an artist and music enthusiast, I find it extremely important to listen to as much music as possible, no matter the genre or style. Because not only will you hear things that you could never imagine yourself enjoying, it also gives you insight to other people worlds, cultures and background, which is one of the best parts about music in the first place.

Not exactly sure what you mean by “experience and skills”, but if you mean just overall as people, I can tell you of my (Ison’s) personal experience. I was the kid in school that would bring my guitar and practice during my lunch breaks in the music room. I remember getting teased and questioned by my peers, but I never really saw it as something to be ashamed of. It was just something that I would’ve rather spend my time doing than anything else. As I got into high school, I began to notice myself drifting further and further away from everyone around me. Thinking about music, and everything I wanted to do with it, took up the majority of my thoughts. I remember even writing songs during class, turning the teachers voice into muffled mush. It got to the point where, the next year, I enrolled into online school, where I would graduate a year early to focus all my time into music. It also gave me a unique opportunity to let myself grow without the distracting influence of the people around me, and especially looking back on those years, I really appreciate that.

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Tell us about your genre, concept and idea behind your music video and the song.

Ison: It is never an artists job to label themselves. Artists and performers are just supposed to create and reflect. It feels like a waste of time trying to figure out the “perfect genre” that we think we fit in, because in reality, people will label you however they see you. It’s inevitable. On the other hand, when we feel we “need” to put a genre to what we do, we sometimes use “retro wave”, mainly because we think it sounds cool.

As a band, we are extremely fascinated by the notion of taking a simple idea, and stretching, squeezing, bending and pulling out any creative juices we can from it. Like in the movies that take place primarily, if not, totally in one location (i.e. Reservoir Dogs or Panic Room). For example, in the music video for “Head Home”, it’s a single frame throughout the entire video, but there’s enough going within that frame to keep it interesting. There’s dynamics throughout. It will go from chaos, with flashing ever-changing colors and background, with rotating heads and dancing bodies. And then it will transform into a still, static background, with a still body in the center simply singing the words.

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Tell us everything that we need to know about you as a musician and the ups and downs you have faced in the music business. 

Ison: I think it’s fair to say that the music industry is one of the most interesting businesses on the planet. It’s insane to think that someone could have more raw talent than anybody else and never be able to reach his/her potential of success. Yet, someone who has no talent can be one of the biggest performers in the world. And obviously the internet amplifies that potential problem to a deafening volume these days, but in reality, that has always been an unfortunate truth of the industry. Although I do believe that the internet can also help shine a spotlight on some truly talented artist that may not have it otherwise. On the “business” side to the “music business”, I believe it’s pretty known that a lot of people are just looking for the quickest way to make money and really could’t care less for creativity or artistry. We’ve been in situations where people we were working with wanted to change us entirely: change our name, our music, our direction, what we believe in, everything. And it just got the point where we had to say no and remove ourselves. We believe in what we’re doing and have a clear direction of where we want to be, and we don’t want to have to rely on anyone to get there. I mean, this is a “music business”, and it’s important to understand both sides. But I’ve also noticed that the business doesn’t change the kids, it’s kids that change the business.

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Tell us about other members of your band, music producer, crew or music video director, how the song was recorded and how the music video was shot. 
Ison: It’s funny to look back at the formation of the band and think about how it all came together. With all of us being in the same general area, around the same time, it’s very interesting.

With this release, we’ve done everything ourselves. We haven’t worked with any producers, directors, engineers, etc. It was important to us that we did everything we could ourselves in the first real launch of the band. In the future, we may work with some outside people that we feel could take it to a level we couldn’t necessarily do ourselves, and are already in talks with producers and directors for potential future projects.

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Tell us how long you have been in the music industry, your experience and your future goal. 
Ison: With this being our first single off of our first release, I think it’s fair to say that we’re in the early ages of our career. However, we’ve been around the industry for some time now. We’ve seen the manipulation and greed, as well as the support and motivation. As a spectator, I find it very interesting how uninteresting a lot of the bands are today. I just recently heard statistics that now show “Hip Hop” as the most popular genre of music, overtaking “Rock”, and I can’t say I’m surprised. Especially in comparison to the bands of today, artists and performers in Hip Hop are so much more exciting, in my opinion. And I think what’s pushed the genre over the edge is artists figuring out a way to attract traditional Hip Hop listeners that, in my opinion, are flipping the industry on its head. And unfortunately, it’s hard for me to pick out artists in other genres who are doing that to same the degree.

As for our goals, we want to bring that energy, that has been lost for so long, back to bands. We want to be able to connect with the listeners as much as, or more than, anyone else does. We want to inspire the same feeling that we have when we heard our favorites bands for the first time.

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Tell us what inspires you to write, compose and sing. 

Ison: I try to be aware of everything around me. I think it’s easy for people, when they get bored these days, to restore their eyes to a screen. Now I also believe that the internet can also be very insightful and a great release for people. However, if we would spend just half of the time we look at our phones and try to absorb the world around us, I think people would start to understand what they’re missing out on.

I also find that I inspire myself to write and perform because I don’t want anyone to tell me that I can’t. Anyone says that someone “can’t” do something, can’t do it themselves.

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Tell us the secret behind making a hit song. 

Ison: Anyone who tells you there is a secret to writing a “hit song” is a liar. Just write what you would want to hear and maybe others will like it too.

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Tell us the message you will like to pass to your fans out there. 

Ison: Think for yourself. The world is drowning in pressure to be/act a certain way. For example, you shouldn’t feel like you “have to” go to college. You should only go to college if your line of work requires it. And if you don’t know what you want to do, use the time to figure it out. Don’t drown yourself in student loans just to waste the years away. Be proactive, take control of your own life. Meet people that are like-minded to you, but build yourself to where you don’t have to rely on anyone to accomplish what you want.

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Tell the kind of advice you will give to an upcoming artist. 

Ison: Never say anything is “good enough”, because nothing ever is.  No matter how popular or obscure, the greatest artists are always pushing themselves to write better songs, have better live performances, etc. And with that, learn to “learn”. Pay attention to feedback that you get, positive or negative and use it to your advantage. But don’t let it push you in a direction you don’t want to go. Understand who you are and where you want to be. 

But even before any of that, understand that the music is NOT the decider of who makes it in this business and who doesn’t. Especially in the age of social media, giving people something to relate to and connect with is as, if not, more important because believe it or not, the FANS are the most integral piece of your success. Without fans, nobody cares how good your music is. But if you have good, quality music with tens of thousands of followers to back it up, nobody can deny that.

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Tell us how you write your lyrics, compose, sing and record in the studio. 

Ison: I don’t have just one process to how I write songs. Sometimes a lyric will inspire the music, and vice versa. But I find it important to capture any and all ideas I have throughout the day. Whether it’s just a phrase, title, melody, bass line, etc. And once there is an idea that calls me to go further, I’ll start to develop it. I will typically take it to my computer and use my DAW to layer any element that I hear. I find this is easier for me in most cases instead of writing the whole song on one instrument because it lets me absorb everything at once. From then on, I’ll continue to squeeze out any ideas that could make the song better. It’s important for me not to overthink it but allow it to develop to it’s potential. 

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Name five biggest artists that you like. 

Ison: I believe 5 is a relatively limiting amount, but some artists that I have been listening to recently are: Pink Floyd, Tyler, the Creator, David Fincher (director), The Doors, and I’ve really been admiring what BROCKHAMPTON have been doing.

Jacob: The Beatles, Arcade Fire, Pink Floyd, Metallica and Kendrick Lamar.

Ross: Prince, Nine Inch Nails, INXS, Depeche Mode and The B-52’s.

Mari: Bjork, The Beatles, The Doors, Talking Heads and Pink Floyd.

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Name the artists you have collaborated with before in your songs or artists you are willing to collaborate with in the future if you have the chance to do so. 
Ison: We’ve haven’t collaborated with anyone as of this point. However, personally, I would love to do some production with some hip hop artists I admire. Maybe, Earl Sweatshirt, or doing some work with Daveed Diggs of Clipping.

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Give us the links to your website and your entire social network. 

Website

http://www.yipyops.com

 

Instagram

https://www.instagram.com/yip_yops/

 

Facebook

https://www.facebook.com/yipyops/

 

Twitter

https://twitter.com/yip_yops

 

Soundcloud

https://soundcloud.com/yipyops

 

Spotify

https://open.spotify.com/artist/5imz01yG6K0sjorVycghLJ

 

Apple Music

https://itunes.apple.com/us/artist/yip-yops/1161423740

 

YouTube

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCBMgYpMie0GcwijrY9vV48Q

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Give us the links to your various stores for fans to buy your music. 

iTunes

https://itunes.apple.com/us/artist/yip-yops/id1161423740

 

Bandcamp

https://yipyops.bandcamp.com

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Tell us about your happiest day and saddest day. 

Ison: I think it would be extremely tedious to share, and is, frankly, too personal. But I’ve noticed the similarities in the bad days that I’ve had. I’ve found those days mostly are met with a discomfort with myself. Whether it was because of what someone said, or they way someone made me feel, whether intentional or not. On the contrary, the best days are usually met with discovery. With either myself, or something new that I’ve learned, or an interaction I’ve had with someone I admire. All in all, in my 18 years of life, it’s been important for people to have a healthy dose of good and bad days and realize them for what they are, especially your bad days. I never want to have a binge of good days without any bad, because if everything’s good, then what really is?

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Tell us how you will spend a million dollars. 

Ison: I would probably figure out how to go to space.

Jacob: I would buy a bar and name it “Puzzles”.

Ross: I’d get a Tesla and a well-done tattoo. Maybe some nice steaks and some good seats at Dodger Stadium.

Mari: I’d buy a small piece of land off of Iceland and build a small house on it.


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