Tell us your real names, country of birth, date of birth and childhood experience.

Julianne Quaas – June 15th, 1993; New York City, NY USA

Ricky Hendrix – June 14th, 1993; Mount Prospect, IL USA

Jeff Mills – May 10th, 1994; Winfield, IL USA

Egan Franke – May 5th, 1995; Indianapolis, IN USA

Julianne – “My first major memory of feeling inspired by music was when I first heard the song “Respect” by Aretha Franklin. It was an anthem that awakened my feminist beliefs in equality and self-respect, as well as my love for singing. As for the piano, I always gravitated towards creating my own music instead of practicing the classical music for my piano lessons.”

As the frontwoman, keyboardist and main writer of Julianne Q & The Band, Julianne leads the musical and creative direction as well as manages The Band’s social media, booking, scheduling, marketing and publicity.

Ricky – Ricky found his passion for guitar 16 years ago when watching an early performance of Jimi Hendrix live and watching his dad jamming with his friends in our basement when I was a kid. Ricky’s artistry and technical skills pay homage to his namesake through his epic solos and theatrical showmanship on stage. His thorough knowledge of music theory and jazz fleshes out the music with color and texture.

Jeff Mills – Jeff has been drumming for 11 years. He got into music from playing with an electric keyboard that his aunt gave him as a kid. He would play along with the pre-recorded jingles and learn the melodies by ear. He’s used his aural training to layer vocal harmonies onto Julianne’s lead vocals. Jeff cares deeply about the creative process and has become more involved in the songwriting for the band in recent months.

Egan –  Egan grew up in a musical household with two classical musicians as parents. He’s been playing the bass since 11 years old and also knows piano and guitar. His comprehensive jazz and theory training as a Composition Major has thoroughly the complexity and diversity of The Band’s musical structure.

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Tell us about your music career, band name, musical background, experience and skills. 
Julianne Q launched her solo career immediately after graduating from Boston College in May 2015. She released four singles in the fall of 2015 as well as a music video. She began gigging as a solo artist in the winter of 2015. In the spring of 2016 she formed what eventually became Julianne Q & The Band. Julianne quickly realized that her music sounded insanely better with a full band, and she enjoyed rocking out with her bandmates so much more than just sitting at the piano alone. The Band has been steadily gigging around the Chicagoland area since the summer of 2016. With a new album, new management and frequent trips to the studio, the Band hasn’t let their engines stop.

Julianne was classically trained in voice from 12-17 years old. She sang in choirs and competitive show choir throughout middle school and high school. She then started performing in musical theatre and went on to major in theatre in college. She also studied classical piano from ages 7-17, and wrote her first song “Ode to Nana” (her grandmother) around age 12.

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Tell us about your genre, concept and idea behind your music video and the song.
We are extremely influenced by the soul and grit of legendary classic rock, blues and blues rock sounds – including Janis Joplin, Jimi Hendrix, Aretha Franklin and Amy Winehouse.

I wrote “Heroine” as a response to the traditional dating concept that I like to call “damsel in distress”. This concept has taken many roles over the years. A princess waiting for her knight in shining armor to rescue her from a high-up tower. Lois Lane waiting on Super Man to fly down and save her from destruction. A young woman simply waiting for the perfect “Prince Charming” to come along. All these archetypes have a common theme: waiting for a man to save them. Implying the notion that a woman (or anyone) can’t be happy until she is saved by a man.

Now, let me be clear. I am not bashing men or women looking to find love and happiness in relationships. I do believe it is possible to be a strong and independent woman while still being in a loving and equal partnership with a significant other. I live that possibility in my own romantic relationship. Rather, in this song I’m challenging the idea that a woman needs a man or another person to save them.

We do not.

I believe that people (not just women) should be able to draw strength and love from the beautiful gifts within themselves. From their talents, their brains, their kindness. We are more than enough as we are. Fight for that. I wrote “Heroine” as a fight song to inspire young girls and women to be strong and independent, but most importantly to recognise their own worth and beauty within themselves. We shouldn’t have to rely on external forces to believe that. We have to find these things within ourselves.

At the end of the day, ain’t nobody gonna save you but yourself. So be your own Wonder Woman. Be your own Rosie the Riveter.

Be your own Heroine.

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Tell us everything that we need to know about you as a musician and the ups and downs you have faced in the music business. 
Building a music career is like growing a business from the ground up. Consequently, I’ve had to manage all aspects of my business in order to make it work. From bookings, marketing, social media, networking and scheduling – to the creative side of practicing and writing. I’ve found it extremely difficult to balance the business end with the creative end of my career. So much so that I’ve found it very isolating at times, as I’ve had to handle most everything on my own. Essentially what it comes down to is that if I don’t care enough to get it done, then nobody will. It’s a very haunting and lonely concept. I’ve experienced bouts of depression and self-doubt because I’ve made the mistake of weighing too much of my self-worth on my success in music. At the same time, I would never regret my decision to pursue a passionate albeit tumultuous career in music. I’ve found pure ecstasy and friendship on stage and fulfillment in writing and performing my music.

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Tell us about other members of your band, music producer, crew or music video director, how the song was recorded and how the music video was shot.
The song was recorded at our former bassist Jimmy Provan’s lake house up in rural Wisconsin. Jimmy recorded, produced, mixed and mastered our entire debut album. It was such a blast getting away for a weekend and was a really crucial bonding experience for us as a band.

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Tell us how long you have been in the music industry, your experience and your future goal.
I’ve been in the business now for a little over two years. My goal is to be able to quit my day jobs and support myself solely through my music. I want to tour and grow as a musician and as a business person. I see myself playing whatever arena I want, no matter how big, and throwing an absolutely stunning and amazing rock concert.

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Tell us what inspires you to write, compose and sing.
I’ve found that whatever truth I’m feeling in the moment that I’m writing in is where the best and most honest songs come from. So I can’t write a really good love song if I’m feeling heartbroken and pissed because it will sound fake. It won’t be true and honest. My favorite lyrics and melodies have come from these moments of vulnerability.

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Tell us the secret behind making a hit song.
I don’t think there’s just one secret. I think there are many elements that go into creating a “hit song”. Moving lyrics, catchy melody, unique topic, the passion within the vocal delivery and of course timing of the release.

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Tell us the message you will like to pass to your fans out there.

It is never too late to listen to that little voice inside your head that is desperately trying to get through to you. The little voice that is screaming “this is what I really want to do!” I ignored it until a dark winter night during my senior year of college, when after three and a half years of rigorously pursuing a career in theatre I decided to switch paths and become a musician. It was the scariest decision I’ve ever made, and not everybody understood it. But I followed that little voice and I haven’t felt any regret since.

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Tell the kind of advice you will give to an upcoming artist. 

Remember you are enough. No matter what the number of plays, likes or tickets sold. You are enough.

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Elaborate on your music careers, albums, songs, tours, recognition or awards you might have obtained.

We released a self-titled debut album “Julianne Q” in the spring of 2017. I also released four singles back in 2015. All can be found on Spotify, iTunes and all online music platforms!

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List Radio or TV Stations that are airing your songs and blogs that have featured you as well and send message to them via this platform.
My song “Under the Knife” recently gained international attention in a French music blog. My song “Last Call” was also recently featured in the “Sounds of Chicago” playlist by Chicago Music Guide. We attained a monthly residency at the Elbo Room, which was covered by The Daily Herald (suburban Chicago newspaper).

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Tell us how you write your lyrics, compose, sing and record in the studio. 
I usually write my lyrics in the Notes app on my iPhone. It’s great because I can carry and finish ideas with me wherever I am. I’ll then record a demo using the Voice Memos app. Then the band and I flesh it out during rehearsal and boom! We record one instrument/voice at a time over a 10-12 hour process for each song.

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Name five biggest artists that you like. 

Aretha Franklin

Janis Joplin

Adele

P!nk

Melissa Etheridge

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Name the artists you have collaborated with before in your songs or artists you are willing to collaborate with in the future if you have the chance to do so.

I’ve collaborated with my drummer Jeff Mills on some of his original material. Our styles are different enough where we challenge each other yet similar enough where we can meld something truly amazing together.

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Give us the links to your website and your entire social network. 

https://julianneqmusic.com/

https://www.facebook.com/julianneqmusic

https://www.instagram.com/julianneqmusic/

https://twitter.com/julianneqmusic?lang=en

https://soundcloud.com/julianne-q/tracks

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC7mBG_ogiq9jk2JRyErGTzA

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Give us the links to your various stores for fans to buy your music. 
https://itunes.apple.com/us/artist/julianne-q/1042175989

https://julianneqmusic.com/merch/

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Tell us about your happiest day and saddest day. 

The happiest day of my life was when I performed to a nearly sold out crowd at the Elbo Room on the night of our Album Release Show. All of my hard work writing, recording, organizing and promoting the record had finally paid off in one euphoric night on stage.

The saddest day of my life was the day after my Grandpa’s funeral last summer. I was dealing with the grief and guilt I felt because the last conversation I had before he died was very strained. Furthermore, I was going through an incredibly painful period of turmoil with my family and my boyfriend. The night I had a huge screaming match over these issues with my parents to the point where I saw my dad crying for the first time in my life and I almost broke up with my boyfriend was the single worst day/night of my life.

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Tell us how you will spend a million dollars. 

I would keep $200,000 for myself. $100,000 of which I would put in a college fund for my kids. The other $100,000 I would use for my music career. The remaining $800,000 I would donate to family members in need as well as disaster relief efforts across America.


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