Tell us about yourself. 

Sure. My name is Jacob Craddock. I’m 19. I’m from Orlando, Florida. And I play indie rock music under the name Miramar Drive.

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Tell us about yourself as an artist. 
I started putting out music when I was 15, so I’ve been doing this for just short of 4 years now. I was first inspired to pick up the guitar by a band called Angels & Airwaves. I heard a song from them titled “Rite of Spring”, and almost immediately thought to myself “I wanna do that”. It took years before I wrote and released any originals, but I got around to it eventually. Genre wise… I’ve dipped into a couple of pools, my first love being punk rock. But I started dabbling in electronic music and mixing it with rock elements. I then started listening to smaller indie rock bands like Day Wave and Turnover. So right now I’m mainly playing clean-guitar driven, melodic, rock music. Who knows where I’ll end up next though.

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Tell us about the genre of your music. 
The culture around the music of my genre is very interesting. Most of the bands in the scene that I look up to are making a good living making their own music. And then touring on that music playing 500-cap rooms across the world. Some bands are getting bigger and are opening up on bigger tours, playing festivals, and getting to headline at large venues. These bands are signed, but not to major labels. I think it’s really cool, that we can possibly put out music that might not be enjoyed by the masses, but can still find an audience and connect on a deep level. I’m looking forward to having that kind of success.

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Tell us about the story behind your song. 

‘Slow Down’ was written about experiences I’ve had in my life, but was also a song for the really hard workers out there. I’m not one of those people, I’m pretty lazy in fact… but I’ve gone through spurts in my life where I was working REALLY hard. This lead to me not taking time to enjoy the outside world and the little things. I’ve also learned that the more you work on something, the more you begin to doubt yourself. This is one of the biggest problems among entrepreneurs, artists, and even the working class. The song is really just encouraging people to quite literally slow down, and just take everything in.

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Tell us the challenges you are facing as a musician. 

There’s a lot of things, but the number one thing is that I’m not making a living off my music. Making music is one of the few things I enjoy in life. But I basically have to treat it like an expensive hobby because that’s essentially what it is when you don’t have a big enough audience to support you financially yet. Fans of my music are my oxygen. That’s why I’m trying really hard to turn people on to my music.

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Tell us about the recording and production of the song. 

The recording and production of ‘Slow Down’ was pretty different from everything I had done prior. Ever since I started putting out music… I wrote and performed all instruments and vocals, along with mixing (and sometimes mastering) the music myself. It was only me from start to finish. With ‘Slow Down’, I crafted the song with a pair of songwriting coaches. That really took the song to the next level. I had a couple of my friends who play in a band called “The Swamp Donkeys” take care of drum and bass guitar duties. The drums and vocals were recorded at a professional studio, but everything else was recorded at home. I also still mixed the song myself at home. 

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Tell us the names of blogs, radio or TV stations that have supported you so far.

I recently had a write up from EarToTheGroundMusic.co and will be working with them again soon. Other than that it’s been a couple of blogs, internet radio DJs, and fans that have supported me so far.

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Tell us more about your music career, experience and future goal. 

My experience is pretty limited since I haven’t had any major success yet, but I’ve been working with younger slightly less experienced musicians in an effort to guide them on their musical journey. And my future goal is to impact an audience with my music and be a good part of their life.

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Tell us what inspires you to write, compose and sing.

Great music. Whenever I listen to something good it makes me want to make something of my own that I’ll like just as much, if not more.

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Tell us the secret behind making a hit song.

Haven’t written a hit yet. But from what I’ve seen… make a good beat, throw a tasty 808 over it, have a pitch shifted Alvin and Chipmunk sounding vocal hook, and lastly rap or sing with little effort & repeat phrases A LOT. Boom. There you go, people.

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Tell the kind of advice you will give to an upcoming artist. 

Get feedback from people that aren’t going to sugar-coat it. My suggestion, pay someone to help you with your songwriting and to tell you how good or bad you are, and how to improve.

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Elaborate on your music careers, albums, songs, tours, recognition or awards you might have obtained. 

In a span of almost 4 years, I’ve put out 2 EP’s, and album, and a couple singles. I haven’t toured yet, but hope to soon. I got to play a really cool festival with some bigger bands though and that was cool.

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Tell us how you write your lyrics, compose, sing and record in the studio.

I just wrote a song about a topic my friend suggested to me recently. But most of the time I write lyrics about things I feel pretty strongly about. Nothing I write is very half-hearted. I usually compose a basic guitar part first and then come up with a melody just by humming and recording it to my phone. I then write lyrics to fit into the melody that I just wrote. I use rhyming websites a lot. They’re super helpful and can inspire entire lines with just one word. I used to record vocals by myself, but now I do it in a studio with someone who can give me some direction. It creates a better result in the end.

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Name five biggest artists that you like.

Biggest? Um… blink-182, Green Day, U2, Coldplay, and Mac DeMarco.

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Name the artists you have collaborated with before in your songs or artists you are willing to collaborate with in the future if you have the chance to do so. 

I’ve collaborated with the drummer and bassist of The Swamp Donkeys. They’re really nice dudes, and the best part is that I don’t have to pay them to play on my stuff. They’re just super excited to work with me and create music so it’s super cool. They’re good friends of mine, and everyone in their band is in my circle of friends as well. I’m willing to collaborate with anyone who can make my music better while still keeping true to what I want to do.

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State the links to your social networks and stores for the purchase of your music.

You can listen to my latest song at miramardrive.com and connect with me on Facebook, Instagram, Or YouTube by searching “Miramar Drive”.

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Tell us about your happiest day and saddest day.

I really can’t recall either of those days. We all have a lot of good and bad days.

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Tell us how you will spend a million dollars.

Good question. I’d probably just put in into an account to live off of and re-invest back into my music. I’d put most of it in my savings account though. That’s a lot of money. Thanks for talking to me.


One comment:

  1. K.C. Emery

    December 5, 2017 at 2:40 am

    How do you throw a tasty 808 over it?

    Reply

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