am.i

Share your life story with us.

I’m a Tamil 19-year-old singer born and raised in Ottawa, Canada, currently studying at McMaster University in Hamilton. Music was a part of my life since the beginning – my parents noticed an innate talent in singing when I was young and enrolled me in classes for South Indian classical (Carnatic) vocal music. This training and my growing exposure to different music genres, such as jazz, hip hop, and western classical music, influenced me as I started to break out of my music box – exploring myself and my sound in different sounds. I found a home in R&B, which allowed me to embrace my vocal training in classical music, characterized by microtones, and express myself by exploring my diverse musical influences within the basis of that genre.

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Share your press release.

https://www.amimusic0.com/bleeding-the-press-kit

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List the names of those that have assisted you so far in your music career and use this opportunity to thank them.

Thank you to my vocal music teachers, Mrs. Vidhya Mahadevan and Mrs. Mahathi Sreekumar, for enabling me to develop my musical styles and tastes, refine my singing, and explore myself musically. Mr. Hodgson, thank you for supporting my dreams and guiding me as I delved into lyric writing in high school. Thanks to my friends, who have been supremely supportive of my musical dreams. Thanks to my brothers, who always made music a positive, rewarding experience for me. Most importantly, I’d like to thank my parents for supporting, guiding, and providing feedback every step of the way, for grounding me, without whom I would never have been able to reach where I am today.

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Narrate your experience while recording in the studio or while touring.

Recording “Bleeding”, my debut album, was fast and furious: we recorded and edited all 12 songs in 16 hours in the studio. Many of the vocals were done in one take. These intense recording sessions were immensely valuable, forcing all of us to stay on our toes and be critical of our process. There is something about studio recording that forces you to become intimately familiar with your voice and your music and teaches you about yourself.

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Go into detail about your songwriting process.

For me, the songwriting process always starts with the lyrics. I’m a creative writer by nature and my songs start off with the lyrics, which then match a tune that forms in my head. From the lyrics and the tune comes the development of the chord progression. I often start with a piano, developing some sort of unplugged idea before I write what the song really looks like. It’s hard for me to truly differentiate songwriting and production, because the processes are very much tied together in my music. I then produce the song myself, or work with my producer, TJOnDaBeat, to produce it.

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Brief us on what you have on the way for your fans out there.

I’m releasing my third single, “Cheater”, on January 2nd, and following it up with a fourth single mid-January and the album drop on January 27th. Stay tuned for the album release party – coming soon.

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Tell us what you are doing to increase your fan base.

I’m working on increasing my fan base through social media and streaming – getting that Spotify exposure and working on developing more music. Once the album drops, I’ll begin performing more often and releasing music videos.

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Tell us that point in time that you just feel like giving up on your music career.

For a long time, there was a nugget of doubt in my head, wondering if this music dream is worth the struggle and the work I put on myself on top of my academic focus in health. Yet my academics and my music never seemed mutually exclusive – this creative expression is important to me in a way that academics are not, and vice versa.

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Go into detail on how you make your instrumentation or melody.

It starts off with a tune in my head that I put down on sheet music. From there, it’s a process of exploration, seeing what flows out of and develops from that initial melody. The melodies come out of singing to myself and exploring with a piano. On the other hand, the instrumentation generally comes out of my vision for this song, which develops as I write the lyrics. I often have an idea of what sound or influence the song should have. For example, one of the tracks on “Bleeding”, “Letting Go”, is directly influenced by Chopin’s piano music. I keep that instrumentation in mind when I develop my music, giving opportunities for each instrument to speak uniquely.

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Tell us your complete understanding of music licensing.

Licensing is all about making sure artists are paid for their work (music). It’s about bringing music to all aspects of society and doing it in a legal way that reimburses the artist. Performing and commercial playing of music fall under that (e.g. a TV show). Licensing protects us musicians and helps us maintain the means to keep making music.

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Tell us the best way to get in touch with you on social media.

The best way to get in touch with me is through my Facebook page (www.facebook.com/am.i.music.0). You can also find me on Instagram (am.i.music) or on Twitter (@am_i_music).

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Give us the links to your various stores.

https://store.cdbaby.com/Artist/Ami6

 Merch store coming soon.

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Tell us your favourite genre of music.

My favourite genre of music is R&B, but I listen to and am influenced by a whole range of genres, from classical music and funk to hard rock and electro pop.

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Tell us the subject matter of most of your songs.

“Bleeding” is a story about self-learning and self-transformation, or “healing a bleeding soul”. This album features a lot of music that expresses internal emotions and feelings about different experiences. For example, “Wild”, the first single, is an ode to music and the dance floor, an expression to those feelings that make people want to dance.

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Tell us all we need to know about this song.

“Runaway Love” describes the feelings of initially falling in love and having that lover returned that love. In the context of the album, the character has run away from who he previously was, and tries to reconcile that with his new love. That reconciliation is the reconciliation of the instrumentation and the vocals: chromatic chord progressions with a major vocal tune. It’s all about embracing that initial rush of falling in love and basking in it.

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Tell us what you think about digital distribution and streaming.

Digital distribution and streaming might be the best thing that has happened to music. It provides an amazing opportunity to share the creative expression that is music with people around the world, which old forms of distribution could not do. Despite the challenges it provides in terms of maintaining artist revenue, it’s a great platform and technology.

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Tell us various ways that artists can boost their revenue.

I think the biggest revenue booster is performing. Touring, making your name and music known, and putting yourself out there for audiences is huge for revenue in today’s music world. I think the next best thing for boosting revenue is finding those partnerships with other forms of creativity and entertainment. For example, getting songs licensed for video games or TV shows is a great revenue booster. Thirdly, livestreams and online music/merch drops are a good revenue booster. It’s no longer about just making good music – making money off music is about creating those relationships with the audience.

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Tell us your thought on self-training and going to educational institution to study music.

Self-training is by no means easy. I would definitely suggest investing in some type of vocal training, whether it’s vocal coaching or specific classical training. Getting that different, professional perspective on your sound and your music helps you train to be better by identifying your weak spots and pushing you to focus on those areas. I’m not studying music at an educational institution, but it is valuable for musical people – half of it is learning about music, and the other half is getting exposed to the field, putting yourself out there, and meeting people in the music business.

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Go on at length on what it takes to write a hit song.

Hit songs are all about the hook. It’s not easy to say what makes a catchy hook – it can be an instrument in the song, the drum line, a vocal line, or a mix of all of the above. Simplicity seems to be the key in writing hit songs in today’s world: a simple lyric, easily remembered, or a simple tune, easily sung, tend to get audiences hooked. Writing a hit song is no different from writing a different song – but there are some things that stick in people’s minds.

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Tell us what you will buy if you want to build your own studio.

I’d probably first invest in Yamaha MSP7 speakers, because they show every aspect of sound, no matter how nice or ugly it is. I’d then buy a Shure KSM42 mic along with a stand and filter to get that clear, powerful vocal recording. My ideal studio would have specific DI inputs for synths or guitars, but would centre on vocals.

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Go on at length on what it takes to gain the attention of the audience while playing live.

Your voice should capture the audience. There is nothing more disheartening than a performance where the audience tunes out as you sing. There’s a reason singers like Adele do very few stage gimmicks: a great vocal performance will stop people in their tracks. That being said, be yourself. There will be people who vibe with you and people who don’t, but do what comes to you and don’t look back. The best performances are when the performer does something spontaneous – bringing someone on stage, crowd surfing, wild solos. At the end of the day, performances are memorable when the audience feels like they are part of an experience, or are part of the music. Bringing them into the experience and the process is key to getting their attention and engagement.

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List your five favourite songwriters.

John Legend, Prince, Michael Jackson, Bryan Michael-Cox, Stevie Wonder.

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List your five favourite music producers.

Jermaine Dupri, Kanye West, Diddy, Rodney Jerkins, The Neptunes.

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Describe in details how you feel when you hear your song on the radio.

It’s refreshing to hear your sound on the radio, being displayed out there. It’s like a satisfied feeling, when you’ve eaten a great meal, but you’re not too full.

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Describe your best mood to write a song.

My favourite mood for songwriting is when I’m reflecting on my emotions. Songwriting is my opportunity to bleed thoughts, emotions, and feelings onto paper and express it in music.

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