Broadtube Music ChannelYugao Breeze

December 29, 2017by Kolade Olamide0

Tell us everything will need to know about you.

I’m 19, from New York; I’ve been studying music and audio for almost 4 years. I tell people I’m an audio engineer and not a rapper because they immediately think I just rap fast or the “lyrical spiritual individual” type and I hate those guys.

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State your favourite genre of music and your reason.

Honestly indie rock and folk punk are so cool, I mean I love trap and hip hop because that’s where I like to play, but as far as genres go indie rock definitely has the most potential for a range of emotions. I hate to use the term “indie rock” because it sort of puts the reader in this mental box where they imagine some off brand Coldplay when there’s so much more. But yeah, that is really organic, slow, melancholic rock.

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Tell us your experience as a musician.

Music wise I can’t really offer much because I don’t understand music theory in the slightest. I took percussion in fourth grade because I had to do something in band, but I dropped once I got to middle school and didn’t do anything musically until I was halfway done with high school. By my junior year I was 221st in my class, and there were 235 kids in my class, meaning there were 14 kids who were doing worse than me, and keep in mind that includes the kids that went on to drop out. So my guidance counselor sat me down and told me I could either go to BOCES, which was like a trade school type deal, or to eventually just go for my G.E.D. and try to get a job. So I decided to do BOCES and went for audio engineering. Initially I just wanted to go to make beats because, honestly, I didn’t really know what else we’d be doing if not making beats, you know? But after a while I realized how much there was to do in audio and I was doing all of it because I liked it a lot, and I thought I was kind of good at it. The teacher was an old hardcore/gospel engineer, which probably ended up influencing the way my music sounds more than I had anticipated. So for a year he taught me everything; beat making, vocal recording, equalization, reverb, mixing, mastering, foley, ADR, basically everything you can do in the world of audio. So senior year, my teacher tells me he thinks I should compete in the audio competition that trade schools held, so he teamed me up with one other kid from the morning class and sent us off to Albany to go compete against a bunch of other teams in a mixing and mastering competition. After 3 sleepless nights in the blistering cold we took 1st place and had to fly out to Louisville for the national competition. I actually missed graduation and prom just to compete; half of the people I went to high school with actually thought I dropped out, which was really funny because while they were calling me a drop out I was placing 2nd in the nation for audio engineering. I’m pretty sure they all still think I dropped out.

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Tell us the theme of your song.

The theme? I mean I guess I was trying to capture a moment, like two people who want to fuck but can’t for some reason. It’s also just about taking pride in who you are and knowing yourself. “I know my character down to the T that’s why I play the villain” is me saying “yeah girl, I’m an absolute piece of shit, but I know that, and I’m gonna be the first one to tell you that.”

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Name the people behind your success and thank them on this platform.

The biggest shout out goes to Bill Sperl, my old audio teacher. That man taught me everything I needed to know to make things sound not like shit. AMR and CatPrince too, they put together any visuals I put out for my music. Moises for being the only non-biased source to bounce music ideas off of. Anybody who’s been willing to actually share my music and helped me get the attention I have, so Afrokami, Sermon 3, Lil Boom, Broadtube. 😉

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Tell us about your future goals.

The future is a really big term. I don’t want to predict that far ahead. I do know what I want to do this next year though. I think I can triple my following this year, and my plays. I have 2 mixtapes coming out, “Death of the Internet” and “Harvest”. I want to get “Death of the Internet” to the top of the chart on SoundCloud, I know that sounds crazy but once you hear that project I think you’ll kind of get why I think it should be up there. All the fans I have now are really loyal, like really dedicated, and it’s amazing to see people genuinely fuck with your music. I want to expand that as much as possible. So when I say I want to triple my following, it’s not that I want to triple my number on social media, I want three times as many people legitimately vibing with my music and playing it regularly.

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Go into detail about your opinion on religion and politics.

I don’t really align with any religion or political beliefs. I think labeling yourself sort of limits your belief system, you know? If I agree with a more democratic tax plan and call myself a democrat, I’m immediately grouped with all the other beliefs of the party, and I don’t think that’s right, every person has unique viewpoints. That’s why the two party system is really limiting to our development as a country. I have a weird feeling after the last election though, that in 2020 a third party candidate would get a lot more votes than they did last year. As for religion, I’m an atheist. But I really like mythology. Greek, Roman, Japanese, Chinese, Indian; peoples interpretations of God are really amazing.

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Elaborate on how you think your music is inspiring your fans.

I don’t know if my music can inspire people yet. I did make that beat, record my own vocals in my room, and mixed and mastered it. So I guess if there’s any part of my music that’s inspiring it would just be more in the process of it being made. I mean you’d have to ask my fans why they’re inspired by it, because I really wouldn’t even be able to guess.

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Explain the changes you have observed so far in the music industry.

Songs are getting shorter. I think it’s sort of vines fault. In the 90’s and 00’s, you could make a song that’s like 6 or 7 minutes long and people would listen to the whole thing; there was higher viewer retention. Right now you can look at who’s leading the music industry, and you can see they’re not making songs that are going passed 3:30, which is sort of crazy to me. It’s just chorus, verse, and chorus. In and out. You have to get in quick and hit hard; which was in part the mindset behind “Banditos”.

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State the artists you cherish most and your reason.

CrVck is like my brother in music, he’s got like the same idea of what he wants to make and when he goes in he one takes it. I literally make him do it two or three times because I want to make sure we have enough to mix with but in all honesty there’s no need to, he kills it the first time, every time. He’s low-key one of my favorite rappers right now. Other than that though, Chester Watson is dope as fuck, I’ve been listening to him since I was like 15, and getting to work with him this year was really cool, like surreal, like I’ve been listening to him for 4 years and now I’m making a song with him. I’m really excited to put it out; I kept redoing my verse because I really wanted to match his level.

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Give us the links to your social network and stores.

48 Phantom

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Elaborate on how you develop your lyrics.

When I was younger, a teacher had mentioned a quote, “Write drunk, edit sober”. Actually works quite well.

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Tell us if you enjoy collaborating with other artists or just singing as a solo artist.

Oh collaborating by far, it’s important in this genre to be able to work with other people. Nobody wants to be a J-Cole and work by themselves all the time and the fans will get tired of it. I’ve got a bunch of collaborations coming out this year. “Death of the Internet” is going to be me and CrVck. I started 48 Phantom as a group, but the group sort of fell through so I was technically the only person in it until I linked up with CrVck.

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Brief us your opinion on making music that makes people to dance or making the kind of music with genuine message that inspires them.

I mean, really as an artist you should be able to, and want to make both. You want to capture all types of moods and feelings in your music. You can be the deepest and most amazing lyricist of all time, and that’s all props to you, but sometimes people want to dance, and you’re limiting your universality to listeners if you can only make one kind.

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Tell us what you know about copyright.

I’ve taken a few courses in copyright and get the logistics of it. It’s not as complicated as it seems, it’s just bureaucracy, and that rarely mixes well with musicians.

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Discuss the impact of a Performing Right Organization.

It’s really useful if you register if you care about getting paid for your music. It gives the artist security knowing that their music is being checked on and making sure they’re compensated for it.

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Elaborate on how you develop your melody and instrumentation.

I usually start with percussion, then either make a melody or find a sample. Once I have the beat laid out, it’s really about the mix to get the right mood for the song; I tried to make this sound really old and warm, like something you’d hear in the background of an old Spanish bank robbery movie.

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Go into detail on the recording process of this song.

I actually made this song because I had a show last June and I didn’t have enough music for my set time. So it’s the day before the show and I hear this guitar sample and I go right into Pro Tools, chopped it up, made the beat in like an hour, and then I was just like “alright this is a vibe” and the hook came from that. It was my first show, and I did this song “Broken Stove” to open, and the audience was just kind of confused, because everyone before that was more trap and that song is just dark and weird with a bunch of samples. So then the “Banditos” beat hits, and while I was hitting the part where the beat cuts, these people were losing their shit; they really fucked with this one. I hopped up on the speakers for the last chorus right up to the cameraman and I looked around and people were genuinely dancing and moving their heads with it, and I was like “alright this is special, I need to do more of this.”

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Discuss your music performance.

I try to vary as much as possible, I have songs where I sing, where I rap, where I scream, it really depends on the mood I’m trying to set and what I think is right for the song.

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Tell us how you will rate yourself as an artist.

I don’t think I’m anything worth rating yet, but I really believe I am going to be. In the next 2 years I have a lot of things planned for both myself and 48 Phantom as a whole, and I think once those things are set in motion it will be a better place to rate myself. We are microscopic in comparison to our potential.

 

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