Sonic Minds

 

Tell us everything will need to know about you.

We are Sonic Minds from Germany, a duo consisting of producer Jens and singer Sonja. We have been working together since 2002 and released several albums so far.

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State your favourite genre of music and your reason.

Our preferred genres are electro, synth-pop and dance because of the clearness and versatility you gain with synths.

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Tell us your experience as a musician.

Until now we are mainly a studio project without gigs since it is very complex to perform this kind of music on a stage without appearing ridiculous.

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Tell us the theme of your song.

“Electricity” is about the coolness of our times, everything is

electrified and our surroundings become darker and darker.

 

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Name the people behind your success and thank them on this platform.

Thanks to Sonja for her fantastic voice and Dieter for the great lyrics.

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Tell us about your future goals.

Our future goals are to reach more and more people through our music.

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Go into detail about your opinion on religion and politics.

I do not like religions because they are responsible for the most

conflicts on the planet, it is simply overtaken. I do not want to say anything about politics here, sorry.

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Elaborate on how you think your music is inspiring your fans.

I guess our music has catchy tunes in a danceable garment that could inspire the listeners.

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Explain the changes you have observed so far in the music industry.

The main problem is the internet and streaming platforms since no one is still able to get paid correctly for his music.

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State the artists you cherish most and your reason.

Depeche Mode are my heroes because of their innovative style through decades.

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Give us the links to your social network and stores.

 

Facebook

 

Twitter

 

SoundCloud

 

YouTube

 

Website

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Elaborate on how you develop your lyrics.

The lyrics arise by personal experiences or current social things.

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Tell us if you enjoy collaborating with other artists or just singing as a solo artist.

We collaborated with an acappella band that was fun and inspiring, solo often is a one way trip.

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Brief us your opinion on making music that makes people to dance or making the kind of music with genuine message that inspires them.

You need a simple groove with special lead sounds paired with easy, recognizable phrases performed by a dynamic voice. Too many notes and words overtax the audience.

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Tell us what you know about copyright.

Each composer, no matter if pro or amateur, no matter if signed or unsigned, owns the copyright of his songs automatically.

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Discuss the impact of a Performing Right Organization.

Such organizations are important since they care for the composers royalties. But nowadays concerning the internet and streaming platforms these organizations are not more up to date, I think some adaptations are needed.

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Elaborate on how you develop your melody and instrumentation.

Mostly I step through my synth patches, stop at an interesting one and start developing a melody or phrase throughout. So you can say that a sound is responsible for the style of a track, nearly automatically.

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Go into detail on the recording process of this song.

After collecting enough material I arrange these fragments to a song or rough mix. Then I send the playback to my singer Sonja and my lyricist Dieter. After that we meet to record the vocals and finally the mix-down follows after some editing and correcting.

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Tell us how you will rate yourself as an artist.

I would rate my project Sonic Minds in a good mid field; I do not think that we have to hide behind famous artists. We all know that luck and networks are mainly responsible for success.

 

Marc Ambrosia

Share your life story with us.

My name is Marc Ambrosia. I’m a 22 year old singer/songwriter born and raised in Clayton, NJ. All my life I’ve had a song to sing, but growing up I just always thought that pursuing music wasn’t within the realm of possibility. I was surrounded by people who would profess to me, “it’s great to have dreams, but you need to go to college and get a real job.” When you’re young, you just nod in agreement and do as you’re told… at least I did. Fast forward to my sophomore year of high school, I was in the middle of taking the S.A.T. and I just felt this overwhelming anxiety because I knew I didn’t know anything on the test and deep down I knew I was never really cut out for the college life. I was in total freak out mode in my head. When I finally calmed down and continued on with the test, I had to read a short biography on the great Ella Fitzgerald. While reading about her life and how music seemed to make everything to click for her, I couldn’t help but relate to that. I finished reading the biography and then closed the test booklet without finishing the questions. For me, the test was over. I knew it was time to get serious about music. I started writing like a maniac, booking a heavy amount of shows, and started recording music for the first time. I haven’t looked back since. I knew music was always inside me, and it’s been music that pulls me back into focus, keeps me balanced, and propels me forward.

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Share your press release.

New Jersey artist, Marc Ambrosia. Marc is a 22 year old singer/songwriter who began writing songs at age 15 after the loss of his mother and then the loss of his best friend just 6 months later.

Born and raised in Clayton, NJ, Marc has been singing since age 5. Beginning with performing gospel music, Marc later ventured into rock music and now he’s diving into more natural territory with pop music. He’s also managed to bring his gospel trained vocals into the mix, making for a fusion of pop and soul in his latest 11 songs, which he’ll be releasing one by one over the next year. One song that’s already been released is “Let Me Be Your Secret” and now, Marc has released his debut music video for the track. Able to cut deep with lyrics and captivate with soul, Ambrosia is proving he’s pop music’s best kept secret. In an industry that focuses on tabloid rather than artistry, Ambrosia is committed to taking the high road. “It’s always disheartening to hear a kid say they want to make music and become a star,” Ambrosia explains, “for me, it’s never once been about hoping to take the world by storm and become superstar famous. It’s always been first and foremost about telling beautiful stories and making great art.” Ambrosia has a talent for writing catchy melodies, and a great ear for pop production. “If courage be the strength of love, fear shall be its promise”, Ambrosia sings of fighting past hesitation and fear of losing at love. In his debut music video we are taken on a journey of discovery through a crowded college party, a sunny forest walk, dancing on the rooftop in the city and on a train headed back to the same party where he first sees the girl who inspires his ‘secret’ smile.

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List the names of those that have assisted you so far in your music career and use this opportunity to thank them.

Jamie Myerson has helped me to turn my musical visions into life and I am eternally grateful for his friendship. Alicia Delacorza saw my performance and came up to me and quickly became an integral part of my career from managing press, ideas, and being a soundboard for all of my business ideas. She’s my co-pilot, she’s my secret weapon. Danielle Brusco is my closest friend, my confidant, and my eternal muse. Kitty Miller is one of those people in my life who became an unexpected friend and aren’t those the best kind? Kitty and I are kindred spirits in so many ways and her encouragement, and her candor is truly a gift to me. Finally, my greatest treasure in this life – my dad, Ronnie. Will he ever know just how much I love him, adore him, and think the world of him… god, I hope so!

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Narrate your experience while recording in the studio or while touring.

I’m a total studio junkie, can’t get enough of it. For me, recording a song is to take something imaginary and turn it into something real. Recording music is my favorite thing in the world. Being in the studio, exchanging creative ideas and letting imagination steer the process is the most fulfilling experience.  Are there times of uncertainty? Yes. Are there masterful moments? Indeed. Sometimes all those things are happening simultaneously. There’s no way to explain it. It’s the paradox of production and it works quite fine for me.

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Go into detail about your songwriting process.

Not a day goes by where I don’t have ideas. Eventually, I have enough ideas to throw a song together. Other times, a song just flows out of me and I have the idea and write the song within 15 minutes. Some songs are quick like that, some take weeks, months, even years. The lyrics usually come first.

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Brief us on what you have on the way for your fans out there.

2018 is going to be an exciting year! January will see the release of my next single, “One Step Back.” More songs to follow in the upcoming year.

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Tell us what you are doing to increase your fan base.

Increasing fan base is the most important responsibility an artist has from a business standpoint. The whole reason we write songs in the first place is for the masses to hear them, right? For me right now, I’m releasing a series of singles one by one and throwing out music videos to go along with them. Content is so important now. People may not come to your shows, but they might watch your music video and share it. If you’re lucky, maybe your video will draw them out to your show. Don’t underestimate content. This is a digital world now, embrace it.

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Tell us that point in time that you just feel like giving up on your music career.

I’ve never once thought about giving up on a career in music. Despite the many shady characters I’ve encountered, the dirty deals I’ve been victim of, and the many low-points along the way, I never wanted to give up. If you keep pushing yourself, surround yourself with people whose work you admire and celebrate each of your small victories along the way, giving up will never make sense. Don’t. Give. Up.

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Go into detail on how you make your instrumentation or melody.

After I write the lyrics, I take to GarageBand or my piano and start plunking out a demo, but occasionally I’ll think of a groove first and write to that. I’ll start singing words to the groove in my head and record that on my phone. Then I go to the studio and start recreating the recorded idea on real instruments.

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Tell us your complete understanding of music licensing.

Understanding ‘Music Licensing’ can be tricky and convoluted; however, as an artist, it’s one of the most important aspects of your career. Just think, every time you hear a song on the radio, or in a commercial, or in a film, that music is licensed. Attention all artists, copyright all of your work! ‘Poor man’s copyright’ NEVER holds up, go to your State Congress Copyright website and submit your work properly there. Another word to the wise, NEVER post any of your work until it is copyrighted. In addition to this, all artists should sign up with a Performance Rights Organization (PRO) such as BMI, ASCAP, or SESAC. These organizations work for you to ensure you are getting properly compensated for your songs when they are played or used in sync placements. There’s so much to learn about Copyright, PROs, and sync/publishing, so do your homework! I recommend reading some of Loren Weisman’s many articles on the subject to start!

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Tell us the best way to get in touch with you on social media.

marcambrosia.com is my official website and is the hub of my online presence. Besides that, I’m on Instagram, Snapchat, YouTube, Twitter, and Facebook.

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Give us the links to your various stores.

iTunes

iTunes

 

Amazon

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Tell us your favourite genre of music.

My favorite genre of music is pop. Pop music done right has the power to embody an era. Years down the road a good pop song will remind you of a time in the past. It will take you right back to where you were when that song came out and remind you how much you loved and adored that time in your life.

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Tell us the subject matter of most of your songs.

Being the hopeless romantic that I am, I tend to write about love. The longing for love, the heartache of unrequited love, and the pursuit of true love. I’ve been lucky enough (or maybe not so lucky) to have a lot of experience to draw from. I take the relationships, the almost relationships, the trysts, and the yearning for the relationships I can’t have and turn them into song.

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Tell us all we need to know about this song.

I think ‘Let Me Be Your Secret’ is one of the catchiest songs I’ve ever written. It’s one of those songs where I woke up in the middle of a dead sleep, went downstairs, and wrote the song in about ten minutes. I love writing songs like that. It’s a song with a lot of longing in it. There’s the whole idea of forbidden love and loving someone despite consequences or ridicule. I like to think that if nothing else, people will take away from this song that they are never wrong to love someone. There’s also the idea of people cherishing their secrets more than anything else in the world. If you can find someone who loves you as much as they love their own secrets, you’ve maybe found something worth exploring? There’s been many times where I’ve met someone and have thought in the back of my mind, ‘please, let me be your secret.’ When that happens, that’s usually how I know I’ve fallen pretty hard for someone.

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Tell us what you think about digital distribution and streaming.

Digital distribution and streaming is everything to up and coming artists. If not for digital distribution and streaming, there would be a lot of artists out there who wouldn’t have a way to get their music heard and that would be a tragedy. People being able to buy your songs online is wonderful, streaming on the hand can sometimes tiptoe on dressed up piracy and that needs to be addressed. Streaming is a wonderful idea and for music listeners, it works. What we need know is to establish a way that streaming can work for artists and make sure they are getting properly compensated each time their material is streamed.

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Tell us various ways that artists can boost their revenue.

Boosting your revenue as an artist seems to become more and more impossible as time goes on, but there are ways. Right now, the money is in publishing and sync placement deals. No one makes money on live shows, streaming, or downloads anymore so try and get your songs into film soundtracks, TV shows, commercials, etc. Those placements go a long way and the residual checks you’ll get from those don’t hurt either. As a music listener, that’s honesty how I find most of the music I listen to. I’ll be watching a TV show and I’ll hear a song I like in the background. I’ll Shazam the song and then wind up falling in love with that artist. That happens to me all the time. Now, just imagine being the artist whose song gets in the soundtrack. You’re getting a nice check and gaining new fans like myself who watch the show and look up the song. If you want to boost your revenue in today’s structure, that’s a great start!

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Tell us your thought on self-training and going to educational institution to study music.

I think the age-old question for all musicians will forever be whether to enroll at a university or commit self-training. I think that’s a question each musician will have to answer for themselves. For me, I had to consider the ridiculous math prerequisites it would have involved and then the financial strain I would have found myself in. From that standpoint, it was a no-brainer. It was either go to school for four years or start making records. Financially, I never would never have been able to do both so right after high school, I started making records. It’s a choice that has allowed me to delve into an independent study of musicology that I have found most rewarding. If you’re not going to go to school for music, devote yourself to deeply researching all kinds of music from listening to it, attending concerts, and exploring online. You don’t have to have a college degree to be an artist. I know plenty of artists who went to school and later realized it was a waste of 4 years and almost a quarter of a million dollars if not more. On the flip-side, I’ve also encountered many artists who say they wouldn’t be the person or writer they are today if not for college. You have to feel yourself out and try and gage what it is; you need for your own artist health. As creative, we need to make sure every decision we make is honoring and/or enhancing our artistic health and our artistic integrity.

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Go on at length on what it takes to write a hit song.

To think there’s one tried and true formula for writing a hit song would be foolish. Be wary of anyone who tries to lead you down a path of tailoring your writing to be ‘hit worthy.’ There are too many variables now to be sure of a song’s destiny. All I can say is stay dedicated to creativity and not commerce. Find a solid groove and a hook that sticks in your head. Once you’ve gotten that far, see where it takes you.

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Tell us what you will buy if you want to build your own studio.

If you want to build your own studio, find an interface you like and learn it like your life depended on it. Whether it is Pro Tools, Logic, Abelton, FL Studio, learn it inside and out. Once you do that, you may discover like I did, that engineering is just not for you and that’s fine. Maybe, you’re more of a producer only. If that’s the case, play around in GarageBand and get your ideas mapped out and then find someone you love working with who can help take your little GarageBand ideas to the next level.

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Go on at length on what it takes to gain the attention of the audience while playing live.

To really capture an audience during a live show I think it’s most important to let the music do the work. As a performer, it’s your duty to make sure you and your band are kicking ass on every level and firing on all cylinders. Your songs should sound tight and your performance should be slick. Another big aspect of a good show is to not underestimate the power of mystique. Entice an audience by not being such an open book. Don’t be an “easy girl,” play hard to get. Make the audience WANT to learn about all the colors that make you unique. If you have great songs, the songs will let the audience into your world just enough to make them want more. Always keep them wanting a little more. And finally, don’t talk too much. Talking in between every song is too much and doesn’t leave much to the imagination. Find three or four interesting stories to spread throughout your set and then let the music do the rest.

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List your five favourite songwriters.

Emily Saliers, Christine McVie, Mree, Ryan Adams, Sade.

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List your five favourite music producers.

Jamie Myerson, Lindsey Buckingham, Mree, Rick Nowels, Mitchell Froom.

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Describe in details how you feel when you hear your song on the radio.

When I hear one of my songs on the radio I can’t help but go right back in my mind to when I wrote the song and all the memories of being in the studio recording it. For instance, when I heard “Let Me Be Your Secret” on the radio for the first time, I couldn’t help but think back to sitting in Chris D’Antonio’s living room in the summer of 2016 cutting the demo with him. It’s amazing to think of yourself working on a little lo-fi demo and then before you know it, it’s a finished piece that’s on the radio for the entire world to hear. I just hope people are listening!

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Describe your best mood to write a song.

For me, my ideal environment for songwriting is in my dark red writing room with tiered roman candles lit, my mac desktop dimly lit, and white gold Christmas lights that hang from the ceiling all year long. 3A.M right until the morning comes serves me well in that room. That’s exactly how and when “Let Me Be Your Secret” came to life.

 

Nikita

Tell us your real names, country of birth and childhood experience. 

Billy Yeterian, Kyle Sealund, Kyle Marceau, Clay Zotta, Keenan Asbridge, Chris Yeterian.

All of us were born in the US, mostly in Connecticut. 5 of the 6 band members went to high school together so we’ve all been playing together in some capacity for a long time.

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Tell us your academic qualification. 

Keenan (Keys, Trumpet) has a degree in Jazz Performance from Western Connecticut State University. The rest of us are not formally trained.

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Tell us about your music career, band name, musical background, experience and skills.

We all have a serious passion for funk and soul music, especially the neo soul movement of the late 90’s/ early 2000’s. D’Angelo, Erykah Badu, that kind of stuff. We also listen to a lot of hip hop and classic funk. We have an eccentric group of interests and likes but the common thread is the love of soul. All of the members except Billy and Chris have been in local bands before. Keenan currently also plays with a band called The Recess Bureau, and Kyle Marceau plays with a band called Simor. Chris has been a producer and engineer in our local scene since he was 16, working with acts ranging from rap to hardcore punk.

The name Nikita is Eastern European in origin. It roughly translates to “victory for the people”. We also enjoy how androgynous of a name it is, as it was originally a male name but has come to be used interchangeably for men and women in the last 100 years or so.  We’re heavily influenced by Prince, Bowie, and other artists who made an effort to break down gender barriers and sexuality norms and enjoy that our name expresses that.

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Tell us about your genre, concept and idea behind your music video and the song.

The song “We Are A Wave” is supposed to be both a statement about the band, as well as an interpretation of a romantic experience. We feel that Nikita is inevitable, and that we truly are a wave, but in context the lyrics are more referring to experiencing a magical connection with someone, and all the ebbs and flows of that connection. The character in the song gets more comfortable with the romance as it progresses, going from nervously trying to make a move to confidently loving his partner.

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Tell us how to run a record label independently and successfully based on your experience as an artist. 

We’re only about 6 months old so we’re new at this! But from our experience the best Indie labels have a super personal touch with their patrons. They listen, they believe in their artists, and give their artists a chance to succeed on their own terms. The world actually isn’t too bad for independent musicians right now, and the labels that are honestly helping those musicians achieve success are incredible, especially in comparison to the outdated giants of old.

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Tell us how you are promoting your music.

We are trying to play a lot of shows in our area, and starting to tour outside of CT as well when we can. We’re also trying to make a dent in the online music community as well, starting with blogs like yours! We also do weekly music appreciation posts on Facebook, and curate a regularly updated Spotify playlist of our influences.

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Tell us what makes you happy and what makes you sad. 

Happy – the feeling of pure unadulterated communication and musical language with 5 of your best friends

Sad – plastic.

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List the radio stations, TV stations and blogs that have aired or featured your new song. 

ThatNewJam

WECS (Eastern Connecticut State University Radio).

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Give us links to where the song can be purchased. 

http://nikitatheband.bandcamp.com

Also can be streamed on Spotify, Amazon, Apple Music, everywhere really.

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Tell us how long you have been in the music industry, your experience and your future goal. 

All of us just a few years. Most of us have yet to truly venture outside of our local scene so we haven’t seen a lot of the bad shit yet. Bracing ourselves for sure though. Our goal is to be able to tour the US and hopefully the world sharing our music! And I’m sure we could list a fair few artists we wouldn’t mind collaborating with along the way.

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Tell us what makes you unique from others. 

Many bands in the funk/soul arena rely too much on an old school sound without bringing a new feel or an honest, artistic approach to the music. We want to be more than just a fun band to dance to for a night. We make music that will move you.

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Tell us your weakness and strength pertaining music. 

We have a hard time saying no to each other. It’s out of love though. We’ve all been friends for a really long time so it can be tough to have those discussions where people disagree on the direction of a song or a release.

Our biggest strength is definitely our individuality. You can hear every single member of the group on these songs and we’re so proud of that.

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List your five favourite songs including the artists. 

I guess I should reveal at this point that it’s Billy (vocals) writing this, so I’ll give you mine. This list carries the caveat that it will probably be different by the time it even comes out.

“Adore” – Prince

“Bag Lady” – Erykah Badu

“On Your Face” – Earth Wind and Fire

“I Found My Smile Again” – D’Angelo

“Pink Matter” – Frank Ocean.

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Tell us your position on “DIY” Do It Yourself” and signing to a major label. 

In the modern music scene it’s incredibly important to be able to manage all aspects of your band in a DIY format. Succeed at that for a while, and then add some people to your team. Signing to a major label is a death sentence for most artists. We will probably never do it.

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Tell us the instruments put together in this song. 

Wooowie, let’s see.

Guitars: Fender Mexi Strat, ’58 Reissue Les Paul

Amps: Dark Glass Microtubes 900 Bass amp with and Aguilar 2×12 cab. Supro Titan 50w, Mesa Boogie Subway Rocket 40w, 70’s Fender Super Reverb, and a Fender Blues Jr. for guitars.

Bass: 2017 Fender American Standard Dimension Bass

Drums: Mostly a Pacific kit, with a Gretsch snare from the 60’s, essentially a pre-supraphonic supraphonic

Keys: Rhodes, Prophet Synthesizer, some various Moog stuff.

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Tell us other activities you will like to pursue apart from music. 

We’re always down for a good hike; most of us enjoy some recreational drinking.

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Tell us about gaining the confidence to sing in front of a large crowd for the first time. 

Personally, I did musical theater so that took a lot of the nerves out of the way before I was ever pursuing music as a career. I got comfortable playing with a band through playing with my friends in a group that did covers at parties. We had a lot of fun and I really started to get a feel for it. Keenan, Clay and Kyle Marceau were a part of that as well.

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Tell us the best way to make money in the music business. 

Work constantly, don’t be afraid of your potential. Know your worth. Those things. We haven’t made any money yet so we’re figuring it out ourselves.

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Tell us your experience pertaining TV/Radio plugging. 

Pretty much none, we’ve gotten a couple spins on WECS, the local college station.

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Narrate your recording experience. 

Clay and I have been working on the skeletons for these songs for 2 years now. We re-demoed them as a band over the summer in preparation for recording. We did four days at Ghost Hit Recording in Holyoke, Massachusetts with Andrew Oedel where we recorded drums, guitars, bass, and lead vocals. We did keys in Hartford, Connecticut with Paulie Philippone of Funkhaus Music, and recorded all the backup vocals at Chris’ home studio. Both of the engineers we worked with are incredible, we plan to do more work with both of them in the future.

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List your various works. 

“We Are A Wave” is off our first EP, “Nikita Pink”! It is currently our only release.

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State links to connect you on social media. 

http://facebook.com/nikitatheband

http://instagram.com/nikitatheband

http://twitter.com/nikitatheband

http://nikitatheband.com

MINDSEED

Share your life story with us.
After listening to a Beethoven at around the age of 6, I turned to my mother and told her that “music does something to my insides”. Fast forward 20 years, and that is still the case. Music is my reason for being and carries my purpose, so I do it.

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Share your press release.
“Braggadocious” is MINDSEED’s new single. Lyrically, the song is written from a humorous perspective of one’s ego run amok, while the music fuses a blend of hip-hop and rock.

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List the names of those that have assisted you so far in your music career and use this opportunity to thank them.

BJ Downey, the host of the Calgary chapter of Rockin’ 4 Dollars, earned us the opportunity to open for legendary pop-punk band MxPx, which we are forever thankful for. We are also extremely grateful for the YYC Music Award committee nominated our single “Rush-Hour Crush for”- “Best Alternative Recording” which offered us more recognition.

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Narrate your experience while recording in the studio or while touring.
Both “Braggadocious” and the entire album “Households” were recorded and produced by Grant Howarth at Audio House. We went in with a particular vision, and what we ended up with was even more than we could have hoped for. The process involved entering the studio having practiced our parts to perfection.

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Go into detail about your songwriting process.

My songwriting process has always been very intuitive. The music comes first, and the lyrics spawn from the music. I draw inspiration from everything around me.

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Brief us on what you have on the way for your fans out there.

We have a lot more sounds we’d like to explore, and we will be making music until I drop dead.

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Tell us what you are doing to increase your fan base.

We use social media and entertaining live shows to increase our fan base. We also put a lot of effort into our branding and marketing, so we’re always looking to expand on that.

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Tell us that point in time that you just feel like giving up on your music career.

The first time Mindseed ever performed was on a line-up with all reggae artists… obviously, the reaction to us (more rock-oriented at the time) wasn’t great. I sat down on the curb after with my head in my hands and really did feel like giving up. But ever since that night, there’s a fire that has been burning steadily. I just want to make music and see where it takes me, I’m not taking anything too seriously, and life is short. I want to live to the fullest and have no regrets.

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Go into detail on how you make your instrumentation or melody.
It comes to be very intuitively. I can be walking around during my day and a melody will pop into my head out of nowhere, or I’ll be playing on a guitar and I’ll play something that connects with me in a powerful way. Then, I move forward based on that.

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Tell us your complete understanding of music licensing.

Our understanding of music licensing is that the artist is paid by the licensee to use the music for their own purposes (commercials, TV, film and so on).

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Tell us the best way to get in touch with you on social media.

You can get in touch with us easily via Facebook, Instagram, or a message on our website:

www.mindseedmusic.com

www.facebook.com/mindseedmusic

www.instagram.com/mindseedmusic

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Give us the links to your various stores.
https://www.mindseedmusic.com/store

https://mindseedmusic.bandcamp.com
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Tell us your favourite genre of music.

I enjoy all forms of music, but have been especially into hip-hop and rock lately. Hip-hop has appealed to me a lyrical inspiration, in the way that hip-hop artist use wordplay, metaphor to such an incredible degree that I have never witnessed in any other genre of music.

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Tell us the subject matter of most of your songs.

The subject matter differs greatly – from spiritual to humorous, personal and outrageous. In more concrete terms, we have discussed topics like spirituality, relationships, politics, social media, and more.

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Tell us all we need to know about this song.

This song is written from the perspective of one’s ego, and is NOT a reflection of who I am personally. I wish people would separate the art from the artist, as I feel an artist has the creative right to step outside his own mind and into the shoes of a character. Much like an actor playing a role in a film is not judged as the character he/she portrays, the same should apply to this song and other music. Let artists try new things – if it’s not something you enjoy, just don’t listen to it! Someone else will enjoy it! But people are going to think and say what they want to think and say.

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Tell us what you think about digital distribution and streaming.

Digital distribution is fantastic, and enables us to get our music out to people we might not have been able to in a pre-digital age. However, the drawback is that the competition is tenfold, which challenges us to increase our knowledge in other areas such as branding and marketing.

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Tell us various ways that artists can boost their revenue.

An artist can boost their revenue by offering a truly fantastic musical experience.

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Tell us your thought on self-training and going to educational institution to study music.

Considering I’m a music teacher who took piano lessons at the age of 10, guitar lessons at age 13, I am a huge proponent of a formal musical education. Self-training is good, but having live feedback on a regular basis is integral in not developing poor habits.

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Go on at length on what it takes to write a hit song.

A chorus/hook that gets stuck in your head whether you want it there or not, engaging lyricism and quality production.

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Tell us what you will buy if you want to build your own studio.

A powerful Mac, studio monitors, mixing board, professional microphones, a solid-state hard drive for backups, and so on.

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Go on at length on what it takes to gain the attention of the audience while playing live.

To capture the attention of your audience when performing live, a solid groove that people can jive to and a bit of vulnerability plus some silliness can work.

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List your five favourite songwriters.

Daron Malakian (System of a Down)

Tupac Shakur

Jimmy Urine (Mindseed Self Indulgence)
Mos Def

Maynard Keenan (Tool)

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List your five favourite music producers.
Dr. Dre
Grant Howarth
Rick Rubin
Brian Eno
Quincy Jones

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Describe in details how you feel when you hear your song on the radio.

When our single “Rush Hour Crush” was played on major radio for the first time, it was the most incredible feeling I had ever heard in my life. I remember dreaming about that when I was younger, so to have it manifested in real life was a feeling I could never fully explain.

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Describe your best mood to write a song.

The best mood for me to write a song is whenever there’s an intense energy of any kind (joy, anger, sadness) to build from.

Apex Zero

Share your life story with us.

I was born and raised in West London, living in Shepherds Bush, Brentford then Hounslow. I played football a lot as a kid and would’ve gone pro if I didn’t get injured. When I did get injured I lost a lot of love for the game and got into a lot of other stuff, especially music. My brother was a Garage DJ so I used to watch his emcees come by our yard and spit, and I knew I wanted to do that. When I fully got into Hip Hop heads like Wu-Tang, DMX, MOP, Nas, Big Pun and Tupac I knew Hip Hop was the music I’d express myself through, I connected with it more than any other type of music.

I grew up mixed race in the 90’s in London and had a lot of problems with racism. My father’s Grenadian and my mother’s English, so I got a lot drama growing up, especially from police. They used to terrorise me and my friends. So when I heard Dead Prez, and found out about Marcus Garvey, Malcolm X and The Panthers I knew how I needed to live my life and the kind of music I wanted to make. I’ve spent my life doing that, community organization, protesting and making music, working with young people to focus on productive activities and educating myself and others in the history of my people and our struggle.

With my group First and Last I built a good reputation on the Hip Hop scene in London and around the UK, performing at spots like Deal Real, Speakers Corner and End of the Weak as well as Jungle and DnB raves and started getting shows and press in Europe. After releasing 5 underground mixtapes and projects and getting a master’s degree, I put out my first solo album in 2013 and got a crazy reception. I got a 4* review in Mojo magazine, was nominated for Wordplay magazine’s album of the year and got attention in the US and South America as well as Europe. I got involved with I Am Hip-Hop Magazine and interviewed Hip Hop legends Dead Prez and Onyx.

I wanted to broaden my opportunities and my world, so I started travelling, I’d already been home to Grenada and to Ghana, then I took up the opportunity to go and live in Beijing. After a few months I got involved in the Hip Hop and Bass music scenes, performing at festivals and on line-ups with international artists like Perfect Giddimani, OG Maco and UZ. I built strong ties with some of China’s most talented home grown and China-based international artists like emcee Jackson Turner, Reggae singers General Huge and King Lion Miguel, DJ and producer Conrank, up-and-coming Chinese rappers Dungeon Beijing and the pioneer of Chinese Hip Hop MC Webber. I toured China twice in 2016 and 2017 and performed at spots across Asia including Japan.

After returning to London, I got deeper involved with GlobalFaction, the production house that’s made a lot of my videos and have supported Jedi Mind Tricks and Big Noyd of Mobb Deep, interviewed Vinnie Paz, Natty and Ghetts, recorded a reasoning session with the legendary Junglist Congo Natty and performed at the End of the Weak world finals week in Prague.

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Share your press release.

My new release is an EP “All and Nothing” that I dropped in September 2017. The EP captures my creative and artistic growth since leaving London, both in my lyrics and the sound. It’s still Hip Hop but I’ve brought in elements of DnB, Dub and other Bass driven styles. There’re features from MC Webber, Jackson Turner, General Huge, King Lion Miguel and OMeza Omniscient from First and Last. There’s production from OMeziah, Polish beatmaker Frank Freeman, Irish producer GI and DnB DJ in:theory and the EP was mastered by veteran producer Chemo.

I’ve released “All and Nothing” through Design Chaos the label we’ve release all the First and Last material from, but it’s also been released by DB Bros Records in China, the label created by MC Webber and General Huge based in Beijing. We’ve had a great response across the world so far. Our 3 music videos for ‘21st Century Enslavement’ ‘Flying High’ and it’s remix, filmed across Vietnam, Japan, Malaysia, Cambodia and China are getting a lot of love on GlobalFaction’s YouTube channel and DB Bros platforms in China. My collaboration with MC Webber and Jackson Turner ‘Music Souljahs’ is on over 500k views in China so far.

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List the names of those that have assisted you so far in your music career and use this opportunity to thank them.

I’ve been working on music for over 15 years with OMeza Omniscient, we started our crew First and Last together in school and everything I’ve built as a solo artist has its foundation on the work we put in in those early days. Our first projects were with the dope producers Craze and Hoax, who’ve gone on to massive things; I definitely owe them a lot. We also worked a lot with a crazy producer Nikel who’s worked with some of the biggest UK Hip Hop heads and now’s based in Kenya, he produced out first real banger ‘Fade Away’. All the emcees, producers and artists I worked with over the years, Le Hornet, Aurahkel, Seaper and Paradox (who are huge comedians now), Yellow King, Son of a Queen, Kyra, GI, Frank Freeman, in:theory. All the older G’s and heads of my generation who supported and brought me in on things, Da Flyy Hooligan, Manage, DJ Snuff, DJ Steaz, Kissy K, eMCee Killa, Amy True, Logic, Oliver Sudden, Hasan Salaam. HS Pro and Biggerman and all the other Itch FM DJ’s like Sammy J and DJ Madhandz. Everyone I’ve organised and protested with over the years – you know who you are – especially Raspect Fyabinghi who’s taken it to another level with G.A.N.G – Guiding A New Generation. Urban Elite did amazing things for my debut album and everyone who supported through that campaign. Archetype, Frank Freeman and Gem who played in the band for that album – you all killed it. Mike at cHip sHop for putting me on and Yeti for making that link.

Everyone at I Am Hip Hop and No Bounds who’ve supported me from the moment we met. My brothers at GlobalFaction, without their vision, talent and platform I wouldn’t be anywhere near where I am. My brother Al Lawson, an incredible engineer and mixer. Chemo for mastering my EP. The fam around the world at EOW, especially Mas Law for bringing me in. Shouts to my man Slim and Jimmy Chiba for ridiculously dope videos. To Dave Jackson for the advice and help.

After I moved to Beijing I got incredible support from my brothers MC Webber aka Raddam Ras, General Huge and Flo at DB Brothers Records and my brothers Jackson Turner and King Lion Miguel. They helped with everything from recording to touring and everything in between. Simon Yu for an incredible video production. My Syndicate family, Blackie, Clir, Kay C, Tonk, Chole who put me on ridiculous platforms. Nasty Ray and Conrank for all the bring-ins, Oshi for the support, my fam at Unchained for the crazy tour, Siesta for helping that happen, Passenger at Electric Underground for always supporting, Paul P from for starting it all, the organisers and the brothers from In3 for showing so much love, promoters who’ve booked and Yangbae and Kailin for their translations.

Everyone who’s been posting, sharing, buying copies of my music, reviewing, coming to shows for years all over the world – love and respect.

My wife and my family for all the unconditional support.

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Narrate your experience while recording in the studio or while touring.

The studio and the stage are home. They’re where I feel best. Creating is one of life’s greatest aspects and getting to share that with people around the world is a beautiful thing.

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Go into detail about your songwriting process.

I like to quote CeeLo Green here – “listen to God then write”. Even though my lyrics are definitely cerebral and conceived in the mind, I get in the zone by channeling higher forces and letting them flow through me, I attempt to tap in and translate what I can. I aim to find my rhythm within a beat, then align the feeling it brings out in me with that rhythm and what it is I want to say. Sometimes those things change as I write, but that’s the beauty of the process.

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Brief us on what you have on the way for your fans out there.

I’m working on a bunch of collaboration EPs with some dope producers, some Hip Hop and some branching more into Bass music, especially DnB. I’ve got a lot of collaborations coming out on other people’s projects, especially with DB Bros records and should be heading back to Asia to tour again soon. I’m traveling to the Venezuelan Amazon with the Roots singer Natty to film a documentary on a spiritual journey he’s bringing a few of us on, really looking forward to that.

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Tell us what you are doing to increase your fan base.

I’m trying to work with as many talented people as I can, and truly trying to take my music global. I’ve been blessed to be brought in to GlobalFaction who’ve put me on to opportunities like the film I’ll be doing with Natty. I’m trying to take every single opportunity that’s coming my way and make the most of them. I’m trying to make the most of my life while I have it and I think people are responding to that.

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Tell us that point in time that you just feel like giving up on your music career.

When I left London and moved to Beijing I didn’t have music in my plans. All I wanted to do was see the world and learn from it, but the way I connected with people was through music and Hip Hop culture. Both transcend language and connect the people who are connected to them. The fact that I was on a different continent in a completely different culture but still found people who I got on with like we’d grown up together reaffirmed my love for music and Hip Hop. That, alongside all the incredible things I experienced in different countries put me back into the creative process stronger and more inspired than I’d ever been.

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Go into detail on how you make your instrumentation or melody.

A lot of the beats I make myself are based on samples, or samples that I recreate myself. I usually hear something that really speaks to me, cut it and try to really draw out then accentuate the part that spoke to me and build it into something it wasn’t before. I try to take things that are far from what people might associate with Hip Hop or Bass Music and bring it into the spectrum/culture through my production.

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Tell us the best way to get in touch with you on social media.

I’m most active on Instagram

https://www.instagram.com/apex.zero/

You can get me on FB here

https://www.facebook.com/apexzero00

And on Twitter here

https://twitter.com/apexzero00

Also check my team GlobalFaction at

http://www.globalfaction.com/

– all the socials are there.

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Give us the links to your various stores.

You can get everything from here:

www.apexzero.co.uk

– links to iTunes, Apple Music, Spotify, Bandcamp etc. are all there.

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Tell us your favourite genre of music.

Hip Hop has always been my heart, but Hip Hop is interwoven with so many different branches of the tree that’s rooted in Africa – from indigenous art forms, to Reggae, Dub, Dancehall, Soca, Jazz, Blues, Jungle, DnB, Grime, House – I love it all.

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Tell us the subject matter of most of your songs.

I try to rep the true essence of Hip Hop – empowering people that government and oppressors aim to disempower, aiming to free people who are supposed to be controlled. My main goal in life is to help my people and those like us anywhere in the world live free, to be able to determine their own life and strive for their own goals, individually and collectively beyond manipulation. That, and to challenge people to think, question our existence and to celebrate and live their lives.

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Tell us all we need to know about this song.

My newest track ‘The Way’ is a reflection on the thoughts I run through constantly about the human condition – dealing with being conscious of our existence, our eventual, inevitable (physical) death and struggling with questions we’ll never fully know the answer to. I’ve learnt over years that lots of people spend time looking for one definite answer to these questions and there are infinite answers given from different people or sources. It came to me a few years ago that maybe they all have elements of truth in them and that none of them are completely right, so in a sense, everything is right and wrong. That seems to be a contradiction or a paradox, but that’s what life is, so maybe that’s the answer, which itself is probably right and wrong.

The beat was made by a dope Irish producer called GI who’s worked with a lot of heavy emcees over the years. Soon as I heard it I knew I wanted it and he hooked me up. The video’s directed and produced by GlobalFaction and as always they’ve created something that perfectly captures the vibe.

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Tell us what you think about digital distribution and streaming.

I fought against it a lot when I was younger as a lover of vinyl and CDs, and I do think something’s lost from not being able to touch a physical copy, but it’s incredible to have access to almost the entire world’s music instantly, and I think that makes it worth it. It also makes it a lot easier for someone like me who’s determined to stay independent to get my music to the world.

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Tell us various ways that artists can boost their revenue.

Best thing I ever did was move country, find a scene that appreciates me and make links there. The more I’ve moved around, the more I’ve met people and connected with heads who feel me in different places. The world is much, much bigger than your city or even your country, and there’s heads who might love what you do all over it, so go find them.

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Tell us your thought on self-training and going to educational institution to study music.

Most of what I’ve done has been self-taught, but I do have some basic training from institutions. I think both are valuable, depending on where you go, what you do, what you can afford and what it is you want to achieve. I think if I’d gone to some better institutions I might have more links to things that might have helped me, but then I know people who did and don’t have them either. I think it really is about the individual, those who know what they want and drive towards that as early as possible seem to achieve the most, especially if you don’t have family in the industry – for those who do its clearly a lot easier. For those of us who don’t, take every chance you get, but like I said, figure out what you want as soon as you can, then go in hard for it.

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Go on at length on what it takes to write a hit song.

I couldn’t tell you about writing hits, I’ve never done it. It also isn’t my focus or my skill. I think to make a track that is universally appealing is an incredible skill, but I always seem to prefer artists and tracks that push boundaries, are honest to the creator, that blow my mind when you hear them, even if it’s not a hit. That’s the kind of music I aim to make.

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Tell us what you will buy if you want to build your own studio.

A good quality mic is essential and all the acoustic gear to make the quality as high as possible. But that isn’t my area. I’d say, unless you want to be an engineer, don’t build a studio, and find a good engineer who feels what you’re doing because their passion is making you sound good, like your passion is creating the music. Same as videos, artwork etc. Unless you really enjoy those elements, try to find someone who does and you can work as a team, collectively you can achieve more. Even if you do love all of it – creating, engineering, designing, promoting, find someone who loves it, is already doing it and learn from them.

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Go on at length on what it takes to gain the attention of the audience while playing live.

First and foremost, it’s talent, then a lot of practice. I think there’s a balance between preparation and spontaneity that the greatest performers find perfectly. Each performance should be individual and unique. I think stage presence comes from charisma, practice, interacting with the audience and not holding back. You can see, hear and feel when someone genuinely loves performing and is completely in the zone when performing, it can’t be faked.

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List your five favourite songwriters.

Bob Marley and Peter Tosh

Erykah Badu

Lauryn Hill

Big Punisher

M1 and stic.man from Dead Prez.

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List your five favourite music producers.

The Rza and Wu-Elements

DJ Premier

Havoc

Raphael Saadiq

Nujabes

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Describe in details how you feel when you hear your song on the radio.

It’s a beautiful thing. It’s a real sense of achievement and it’s dope to know someone feels your art enough to play it. I’m always very critical though, so I’m usually comparing it to the tracks around it to see how it fits in terms of quality. I think that’s normal for independent artists when you’re played among tracks that have been made in some of the world’s best studios or mastered by the best engineers.

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Describe your best mood to write a song.

In tune; when I’m properly in tune with a beat, or my inspiration, or a sample, or my thoughts or feelings, or what I want to achieve. I think the best tracks come when it’s not forced at all. You can get yourself into the zone sometimes and that works too, but when you just find yourself in it and are ready to channel the creativity, that’s when the best art’s produced.

Nick de la Hoyde

 

 

 

 

Share your life story with us.
Throughout my childhood I always had a huge passion for football and at the age of 15 I was blessed with the opportunity to relocate to Barcelona, Spain to further my development and play semiprofessional football.

Being young, it was very tough for me to leave my family and my friends behind and live in another country, particularly as at the time I was unable to speak Spanish.

Through all the tough times of trying to establish my football career and also dealing with being alone, I would write down how I was feeling in a personal journal.

These thoughts soon led to poems and then to songs as I started to get deeper into music. Basically music took over my life. I returned my home in Sydney and left football behind. Music is now all I want to do!

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Share your press release.

NICK DE LA HOYDE – HOLD ME CLOSE

HOLD ME CLOSE

Nick’s newest installment “Hold Me Close” is his brightest yet. The track is filled with energy, from its pulsing trop vibes to the swooning vocal melodies – it has enough to lift into exultation and create a dance party of any situation. The single marks the evolution of Nick’s musical style into one that is thoughtful of both the senses and the mind, continuing the sense of free-spiritedness that has come to define his music.

SPOTIFY PLAYLISTING

Upon release, “Hold Me Close” has been given promised adds to a number of high profile independent Spotify Playlists including Robaer’s EDM House 2017 with over 400k listeners. Nick’s previous releases have been added to Official Spotify Playlists such as ‘New Music Fridays’ and ‘New Pop Sounds’.

FANBASE

Nick continues to cultivate his ever-growing social media following with strong numbers across his key platforms, most notably Instagram which now boasts 358K active followers and Facebook where his following jumped to 160k. Nick continues to focus on his social media through consistently engaging with through a consistent flow of unique, self-produced content.

TOURING

Nick recently toured Australia, supporting US artist MAX (Max Schneider) on his Meteor Tour. Venues included the Triffid in Brisbane, The Evelyn in Melbourne as well as the Bald Faced Stag in Sydney and Fowlers Live in Adelaide.

CHART

Nick’s music has charted on USA’s Billboard BDS Top 40 Indicator and Mediabase Top 100, Shazam (AU) Furture Hits (#6) and Australian Top 100.

VIDEO

Nick’s videos have been featured on publications such as Billboard online magazine, MTV, Channel V and MTVU.

 

AWARDS

AusPop Awards finalist, in the category of Independent Artist Of The Year, 2017

Song ‘Thinking Bout You’ a finalist in the International Song Contest (ISC) 2017 for R&B

PUBLICITY

Nick has been featured in a wide cross-section tastemaker media, including Perez Hilton, Billboard, The Source, The Huffington Post, Just Jared, PopCrush, UPROXX, Mechanical Dummy, The Examiner, All Access Magazine and more.

Sydney, Australia based singer/songwriter/rapper Nick de la Hoyde began expressing himself through music when he was 16 while pursuing a professional, football career in Barcelona. Music quickly became a driving force in Nick’s life and through that creative lens; he began to express his deeply personal thoughts of being a determined teenager chasing his dreams in a foreign land. This early creativity eventually won out and brought him back to Australia to pursue being an artist full-time. Growing up in a multi-cultural home with a Syrian mother and British father, Nick was exposed to many global influences which he weaved into his music melding his love of hip hop and R&B with electronic alt/dance beats together with introspective lyrics that chronicled a young, musician’s journey to adulthood overcoming life and artistic challenges along the path. Nick and his long-time producer/collaborator/older brother Joseph (ZUZU) de la Hoyde, have crafted a sound that is simultaneously intimate, expansive and engaging. Now at 23, Nick has penned confessional, real life anthems such as “Love Takes Time”, “Thinking Bout You”, “Never Gonna Beg For It”, “By My Side” and “Changing” that oscillate between moody, textured R&B and anthemic synth laden future-pop moments combined with a lyrical earnestness that speaks directly to today’s younger generation. Nick has quickly made a name for himself, cultivating a large and dedicated on-line following and becoming a powerful voice for youth empowerment and positivity.

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List the names of those that have assisted you so far in your music career and use this opportunity to thank them.
The biggest names that have been there through thick and thin would firstly be My brother Joe and my Dad Chris. Of course my manager Dyana Kass and my Family. Without them I would not be where I am today.

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Narrate your experience while recording in the studio or while touring.
My two favourite things are studio time and touring. There is nothing better in the world than letting out all your emotions, thoughts, feelings and energy, things that you have held onto for some time and then channel them into writing a song.
I am lucky enough to work alongside my brother ZU/ZU and we get to share that experience together.

 

Touring is also on the same level, because on stage you have the opportunity to share that energy and emotion with people face to face. That interaction is priceless!

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Go into detail about your songwriting process.
Usually my producer ZU/ZU will work on an instrumental skeleton of a song and when he is happy, send me the rough demo. I will then give it a listen, vibe on it and start to searching for the right melody. Then once I have an idea of a verse and chorus melody, I will write lyrics that tell the story I am holding inside. Once ZU/ZU feels we have something, we will get in the studio and start laying everything down and this is where all the magic starts to happen. I love the whole writing process, you get to create something from nothing and there is no better feeling.

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Brief us on what you have on the way for your fans out there.
My fans can expect A LOT of new music, since my brother/ producer, ZU/ZU, and I, have been nonstop in the studio and have some exciting tracks on the way.

 

The fans can also expect lots of live shows. I recently supported US artist MAX when he toured Australia and will soon be supporting Kid Ink at a Sydney night club called Marquee. Moving into 2018 I will also be headlining my own shows and hopefully this means getting the show on the road internationally!

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Tell us what you are doing to increase your fan base.

I think social media has changed the world we live in and for any line business it has become a huge factor in the way they now go about their marketing. Connecting with others like yourself and sharing each other’s content is a huge way to cross promote and build. Connecting with people and sharing my songs is what drives me so I will be doing more of that and hopefully people out there in the big world, like my music and feel some connection.

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Tell us that point in time that you just feel like giving up on your music career.
To be honest everyone has their bad days and the music world is a tough one to crack. In saying that not once have I ever thought about quitting music. Music has been there for me through thick and thin, and it’s not something I could ever turn my back on.

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Go into detail on how you make your instrumentation or melody.
This process is probably my favourite thing to do when writing to a song. I tend to find my melody before I find my lyrics. I will literally sit at the computer with the song on loop and my phone open to record. Sometimes I’ll sit there for hours until I have found something worthy enough to lay down in the booth and see how it sounds on the track.

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Tell us your complete understanding of music licensing.
In short, music licensing is the license to use copyrighted music. It is one of the legal frameworks out there that helps protect the copyright holder and ensures that they get paid. As we run our own family label, we own all our copyrights which is really important to us, particularly at this stage of my career.

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Tell us the best way to get in touch with you on social media.
The best way to get in touch with me on all my socials would be to either tag me in a post or to leave a comment on one of my posts. Usually I would say to direct message me but because of the number of message I get, it is sometimes hard to respond to everyone.

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Give us the links to your various stores.

Spotify

iTunes

Google Play

Merchandise

Website
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Tell us your favourite genre of music.
In all honesty I don’t have a favourite genre of music. If I like it I’ll listen to it. I’m not one to not listen to a song purely based on its genre.

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Tell us the subject matter of most of your songs.
Mostly my songs reflect how I am feeling, whether sad, happy, in love, out of love, optimistic, angry, or whatever. There is a lot of emotion in my lyrics and writing is a form of release for me, like therapy lol. A song can mean different things to different people and this is cool, and for example the chorus to one of my songs called “By My Side” is about my love for music, but most people would take it as love for a person – “And it’s you that makes me feel alright, and it’s you that always by my side”
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Tell us all we need to know about this song.
My new single “Hold Me Close” is not only a feel good song, that I hope makes people feel like dancing or singing, but also a song of hope. Always keep the faith and give love a chance!

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Tell us what you think about digital distribution and streaming.
I think digital distribution and streaming is an awesome platform for everyone, whether you are a music creator or a music consumer. For someone like me, it has really given creators the chance to spread their music online and independently, without having to rely on a label.

 

That said, I do feel it has taken away some of the fun we used to get when going out to a music store and buying a physical CD.

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Tell us various ways that artists can boost their revenue.
There are really 3 key forms of income for an artist and of course streaming is one major one. But aside from this, touring and merchandise are very important. Being heavily involved in social media, I am now considered an influencer and so there is good money to be made from forming partnerships with brands. The great thing here is; I get to promote the brands I actually like which is super dope!

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Tell us your thought on self-training and going to educational institution to study music.
I don’t believe that there is any correct way to do it to be honest.
As long as you have the passion and the will inside you then I think it will take care of itself. Whatever works I recon!

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Go on at length on what it takes to write a hit song.
I am still yet to find this out haha. To be honest, the key ingredient for me is patience, because hit songs don’t grow on trees. You really have to be dedicated to writing, never giving up and being prepared to invest 10’s of thousands of hours. You also have to be thick skinned, listen to criticism but also somehow stay true to yourself. In saying that though, I do feel that all hit songs are simple and timeless. They are also very catchy and melodic. People like to sing along to songs they love and this is an important ingredient to a hit song I think. Normally, when a person hears that special song, he/she doesn’t have to listen to it twice to like it, it is instant, almost love at first sight or in this case listen!

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Tell us what you will buy if you want to build your own studio.
We actually already run our own studio and record all of our music from home.

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Go on at length on what it takes to gain the attention of the audience while playing live.
It’s all about the energy you give the crowd. You need to get them engaged in the performance, whether it be singing with you, waving their phones in the air or purely just smiling and dancing to the music. You can make a mistake on stage but if you are giving the crowd energy, they will forgive and appreciate you more than you know.

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List your favourite songwriters.
One of my favourite songwriters that has just blown up would be Post Malone. I think this dude is a genius. So many of his songs are relatable and he writes and sings with so much emotion.

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List your favourite music producers.
ZuZu

Timberland

Skrilex

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Describe in details how you feel when you hear your song on the radio.
It is an amazing feeling!!! When so much hard work, blood, sweat and tears go into a record and you can see that the track is getting recognised there is no better feeling. The song itself will always sound better on radio too haha.

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Describe your best mood to write a song.
As bad as this sounds my best mood to write is when I am depressed and not myself. I feel it always brings out everything inside me, and then usually it helps me gain back what I wasn’t feeling before I started writing.

Kwoli Black

Share your life story with us. 

Raised in Hackney before moving to Essex. I found my talent for music in university at a student jam night. From there I started doing open mic and slowly transitioned into music where I felt I was ready to release my first project. I really just had fun with the process, and the more I made music the more I felt as though I had a purpose.

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List the names of those that have assisted you so far in your music career and use this opportunity to thank them. 
So many to name but –
STRNGS my producer and best friend.

Ore Olukoga, manager and best friend.

Every member of my collective/band ThePack.

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Narrate your experience while recording in the studio or while touring. 

Studio time is really the time I feel the most free. I tend to have either just me and STRNGS or whoever else I’m working with and we just vibe. We have fun. Music is fun, it’s expression and we definitely express ourselves when we record.

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Go into detail about your songwriting process. 
It’s never planned. Most of the time I’m sitting on the toilet and a song just comes to me, then I find a beat that matches the rhythm in my head and it grows and develops from there.

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Brief us on what you have on the way for your fans out there.

2018 -Project 2. We are going bigger and better, my sound has evolved. I’m hoping to make some really dope music and continue this journey.

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Tell us what you are doing to increase your fan base. 
Actively not much, I kinda let the music speak. But I’m doing live shows and radio interviews so hopefully it continues to grow.

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Tell us that point in time that you just feel like giving up on your music career. 

Never ever felt like giving up. Music saved me. It wouldn’t feel right to give up.

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Go into detail on how you make your instrumentation or melody. 

In the studio I tend to phonetically explain the sound I want or the melody or rhythm, and then STRNGS works his magic and reproduces it. Often better than I could explain.

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Tell us your complete understanding of music licensing.

Ensures the creators of the music are compensated when their music is used.

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Tell us the best way to get in touch with you on social media. 

Hit me up on Instagram or Twitter @kwoliblack

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Give us the links to your various stores. 
All streaming sites:

https://t.co/Seniuvcsdp

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Tell us your favourite genre of music. 

Hip Hop.

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Tell us the subject matter of most of your songs.
FREEDOM.

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Tell us all we need to know about this song. 

“Falling” is a true story about a friend who lost his way. There are a lot of references to Peter Pan with the Wendy mentions because Neverland represented to me an escape but not a true solution to the struggles of life.

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Tell us what you think about digital distribution and streaming. 

I think it’s amazing. It gives independent artists a platform to make their way through the industry and control their music.

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Tell us various ways that artists can boost their revenue. 

Music videos, live shows, sync deals.

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Tell us your thought on self-training and going to educational institution to study music. 
I believe if it works for you then it’s good. I’m not necessarily sure if going to an institute gives you a leg up but self-training is important. Everyone involved in music has to learn the craft and everything about it.

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Go on at length on what it takes to write a hit song. 
When I write one I’ll let you know haha.

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Tell us what you will buy if you want to build your own studio. 
I’d have to let STRNGS supervise. He knows the names of all the toys but a full professional set up would be the aim.

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Go on at length on what it takes to gain the attention of the audience while playing live.
You got to connect. If the music is good it will translate but you must be present. If the gig is intimate; make eye contact, if it’s large; bring the energy and the vibes. Show them who you are not just what your music is.

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List your five favourite songwriters. 
Kendrick Lamar

Noname

Chance the Rapper

Kojey Radical

J.Cole
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List your five favourite music producers.

Metro Booming

STRNGS

Kanye West

J Dilla

Pharrel Williams

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Describe in details how you feel when you hear your song on the radio. 

Incredible proud, it’s surreal at times. It’s that realization that your song will be heard by so many people. That’s really dope.

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Describe your best mood to write a song. 

It depends on the song but usually just relaxed.

5 Stars of the Day

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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