Tell us everything will need to know about you.

Born in ‘91 Rodo was introduced to music through the piano at age 3. And at age fourteen he began recording. He went on to become classically trained and by the time he arrived at college he had extensive experience with a myriad of instruments through high school band as well as time spent in the school choir. Soon after arriving at Loyola University New Orleans “Rodo” was born and he joined forces with fellow artist Mvstermind to form the group Rodo an Mo. After going solo he went on to open for other prominent artists like Wale, Chuck Inglish (Cool Kids), and Black Milk. Rodo is also co-founding member of The DOJO NOLA (thedojonola.com), a professional music studio that aims to embody the familiarity of home. Although his social role as an anime fan, pokemon specialist, and a respected sparring partner to the legendary Masters Roshi and Splinter consume much of his time, RODO knows the importance of keeping music first.

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State your favourite genre of music and your reason. 
Hiphop; because it speaks to the soul of the people.

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Tell us your experience as a musician. 
While attending Loyola University New Orleans “Rodo” was born and he joined forces with fellow artist Mvstermind to form the group Rodo an Mo. After going solo he went on to open for other prominent artists like Wale, Chuck Inglish (Cool Kids), and Black Milk. Rodo is also co-founding member of The DOJO NOLA (thedojonola.com), a professional music studio that aims to embody the familiarity of home. Although his social role as an anime fan, pokemon specialist, and a respected sparring partner to the legendary Masters Roshi and Splinter consume much of his time, RODO knows the importance of keeping music first.

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Tell us the theme of your song. 
“EM EL KAY” is based on equality and treating each other as equal no matter what color, race, or religious background a person is.

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Name the people behind your success and thank them on this platform. 
First I’d like to thank God, my parents, everyone involved in the DOJO NOLA, and Evan Thibodeaux of Living Soul Development for making all of this happen.

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Tell us about your future goals. 
Continuing to make strides in the industry while pushing the Rodo brand forward. Hopefully in 2018 I can make my way into the festival circuit and open for more big name artists.

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Go into detail about your opinion on religion and politics. 

Religion is a scared and beautiful thing no matter what your religion maybe as long as you believe in something and in turn treat people the way you’d treat yourself I think that’s the most important thing.

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Elaborate on how you think your music is inspiring your fans. 
I do this for the dreamers, the make believers, that kid that’s sitting in the back of the classroom with his head in the clouds while everyone is telling he or she they can’t. I was that kid. So that’s who I’m hoping to inspire the people that have heard “no you can’t” a million times and still reach toward their dreams and goals. NEVER STOP DREAMING.

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Explain the changes you have observed so far in the music industry. 

As a kid me and brother would sneak into my mom’s car and listen to Tupac cassette tapes which was really my first introduction to hip-hop. So to go from Tupac to 21 Savage is definitely a huge change but it’s been a beautiful ride. While styles my change and fan base maybe different hip-hop is still the music of the people, for the people, by the people (mostly).

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State the artists you cherish most and your reason. 

Micheal Jackson and Prince will always be at the top of that list. Stylistically they can’t be touched and every musician should reach for that plateau that those two firmly sit upon.

 

Lil Wayne; I’m from the south mixtape Weezy is untouchable in my opinion.

 

Juelz Santana; first album I bought with my own money was ‘What the Game’s Been Missing”

 

Jason Mraz; I went through a phase of only singing and playing guitar and all my inspiration came from was Jason Mraz.

 

 

G-Eazy; the first song I recorded and took seriously was recorded by G-Eazy when we were still college. Also my first show ever was opening for Gerald my freshman year at Loyola. People can say what they want about G but that dude will always be in my story no matter what.

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Give us the links to your social network and stores. 

 

Merch Store

 

Twitter

 

Instagram

 

Soundcloud

 

Tumblr

Tumblr @Rodojo21

 

Webstie

 

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Elaborate on how you develop your lyrics. 

I don’t really have a certain way or method to come up with lyrics. I believe that reading and living life to the best of your ability is the truest way to get the best lyrics for any song. The more life you live the more you have to talk about.

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Tell us if you enjoy collaborating with other artists or just singing as a solo artist. 
I love collaborating with others. Two or more minds are always better than one. I’m also part of a collective called The Dojo NOLA.

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Brief us your opinion on making music that makes people to dance or making the kind of music with genuine message that inspires them. 

I think both are essential and I try to do a balance of both. Even if I make a song that has a message at the same time I try to make it something people can move to. It’s good to find a balance.

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Tell us what you know about copyright. 

We have dotted all of our i’s and crossed our t’s when it comes to copyright. Any artist that hasn’t I highly recommend diving into to and making sure your craft is protected as an artist.

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Discuss the impact of a Performing Right Organization. 

I’m a BMI member and while these organizations have their ups and downs, positive and negatives, it’s still really important when it comes to collected royalties and protecting your art.
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Elaborate on how you develop your melody and instrumentation. 
Melody is super important to me. It adds an additional layer and feel to the song that pure hip-hop boom bap sort of lacks. In my opinion melody is the soul to the song and for me it usually starts with a simple hum that we build upon in the studio.

 

I’m also picking with instrumentation. I enjoy different sounds that others may pass on in this particular song I did not make the instrumentation that credit goes to Daniel Brown of The Dojo Nola and owner of DB Productions NOLA.

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Go into detail on the recording process of this song. 

My recording process goes along with the song. If the hook/chorus is first that’s the first part I’ll knock out. There had to be like 8 layers of vocals and melodies on top of vocalign tracks. The trickiest part of this song was the verse. I wanted to say a lot but still stay true to my fun self. Hopefully in this song people get the message, think the lyrics are awesome, and enjoy the beat.

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Discuss your music performance. 

My performances are a lot fun. I have two different sets, one with a DJ and another with my band Naughty by Choice. Both are awesome with a lot of crowd participation but I can’t spoil too much because I’d really like those reading this to come see for themselves one day.

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Tell us how you will rate yourself as an artist. 

On a ten point scale I’d rate myself a 7.5 there’s still so much to learn and so much to accomplish. Once I’ve reached my final form and ascended I can give myself a perfect score but until then I’m just taking the journey one step at a time learning what I can and making the most out of every experience.

 


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