Discuss your personality.

I’m not the best at making friends because I think I have a really short attention span for things I don’t find interesting. Which I think makes me not a great person.

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Brief us about you as a musician.

I played punk music up until 2012 which was when I started Bashful Hips and wanted to do something a bit more abstract where I could focus more on lyrics and sonically make records that had influences in both hip-hop and avant-garde electronica.

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Go into details on what have changed in your life for choosing music as a career.

I don’t really know what’s changed because I’ve been doing this since I was seventeen and don’t know a difference. I have to work jobs that either have a lot of vacation time or are short term. My girlfriend’s mom probably doesn’t trust me.

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Tell us the benefits and drawbacks of choosing music as a career.

Well I still work day jobs but the best part is touring and playing with friends all over the country and feeling you got your message across. When someone digs you live and buys your cd it’s like you brought them into your world and it’s a place they want to revisit. The drawbacks of being an artist is that I always feel guilty if I’m not working on something.

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Tell us how you will manage fame as an established artist.

Fame? Mainly overweight dudes with beards and glasses from ages 25 to 35 listen to my music.

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Elaborate on the story line of this song.

“A Dog’s Humanity” is about how primitive humans are even under the guise of complex systems like capitalism.  It’s also about the extreme avenues we look to for release and escapism.

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Tell us means of connecting you and purchasing your music online.

My music is available in all the streaming services and you can purchase physicals on the website along with t-shirts and stickers and other fun stuff. I just got the Bashful Hips Facebook going a few months ago even though I’ve been doing this for years.

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Let us know the greatest moment of your music career.

I got to open up for Serengeti in Nashville when he was doing the Yoni & Geti project. The dudes been my hero for over a decade and couldn’t have been nicer. I’ll never forget that.

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Tell us the highest amount of money you have ever received from your music career and how it happened.

I apologize; I’m not going to talk about that. But I really appreciate show promoters who do guarantees on top of a door split, provide merch tables with lamps, feed and possibly house us.

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.

.

Discuss your experience pertaining live performances, gigs, shows and tours.

I’ve toured a lot with Spoken Nerd. It’s tough touring but super rewarding. Food and showers is always kind of an issue. I prefer to play DIY house shows over venues or bars.

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.

Tell us how you relate with your fans.

I think it’s a good scene of weirdo’s who like Bashful Hips. We relate on dark humor.

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.

Tell us what you will like to change if you have the chance to turn back the hands of time.

I wish I started doing this social media thing back in 2012 instead of starting at the end of 2017.

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Tell us the most important people that have boosted your music career and how you met them.

Spoken Nerd (Nathan Conrad) has really gone out on a limb for me. My last album he put out on his label Invisible Library Records. I’d seen him play a bunch the first time I lived in Nashville. When I came back to Nashville the first thing I did was email him some songs and he started putting me on a bunch of bills. Solid dude.

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.

Brief us on what you have in mind before considering music as a career.

You got to consider poverty which is so hard. I’m getting closer to thirty so I do play it safe now and have day jobs but I’ve used Medicaid and food stamps to get by. I personally have to have some sort of income coming in. I’ve worked in food service, non-profits, guitar companies and most recently been working in progressive politics which affords some time off because it’s cyclical.

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.

Discuss your good and bad experience in life.

Good experiences are things like coffee, sex, fugazi, when your car starts, food, passwords to HBO Go…

Bad experiences are things like decaf, no sex, the grateful dead, car not starting, no food, no passwords for HBO Go…

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Name the artists that have influenced the world.

Vanilla Ice. He made everyone uncomfortable.

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Tell us about your moment of rejections as a musician and how you are able to cope and move on.

Damn, playing to five people can be totally awesome if they are into it but playing to five people who are on their phones sucks. I deal with rejection pretty well, if someone doesn’t like my art then cool, we can still be friends.

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.

.

Tell us the most negative comment you have ever received about your music.

Hmmm…. In my old punk rock band, a porn magazine reviewed the record and said I deserved to be raped. I guess I don’t want to be that dude’s friend.

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.

.

Tell us how to become a famous artist.

I don’t know. I’m not focused on that sort of thing. I’d love to just make a livable wage playing my music.

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.

.

Tell us how you plan to make an impact on the society.

I want to do well. I recycle.

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.

.

Elaborate on the recording process of this song.

It took me a year to do all the music for “People. Nature. Death.” which I recorded in Nashville. So when it came time to do the vocals, my contract was also up with my job so I moved to a meditation center up in the middle of nowhere for four months and spent about 8 hours a day writing lyrics and recording the vocals late at night. I spent a lot of time on this record in contemplation of my own mortality, the systems of society and nature.

.

.

.

 

Discuss your personality.

I’m not the best at making friends because I think I have a really short attention span for things I don’t find interesting. Which I think makes me not a great person.

.

.

.

Brief us about you as a musician.

I played punk music up until 2012 which was when I started Bashful Hips and wanted to do something a bit more abstract where I could focus more on lyrics and sonically make records that had influences in both hip-hop and avant-garde electronica.

.

.

.

Go into details on what have changed in your life for choosing music as a career.

I don’t really know what’s changed because I’ve been doing this since I was seventeen and don’t know a difference. I have to work jobs that either have a lot of vacation time or are short term. My girlfriend’s mom probably doesn’t trust me.

.

.

.

Tell us the benefits and drawbacks of choosing music as a career.

Well I still work day jobs but the best part is touring and playing with friends all over the country and feeling you got your message across. When someone digs you live and buys your CD it’s like you brought them into your world and it’s a place they want to revisit. The drawbacks of being an artist is that I always feel guilty if I’m not working on something.

.

.

.

Tell us how you will manage fame as an established artist.

Fame? Mainly overweight dudes with beards and glasses from ages 25 to 35 listen to my music.

.

.

.

Elaborate on the story line of this song.

“A Dog’s Humanity” is about how primitive humans are even under the guise of complex systems like capitalism.  It’s also about the extreme avenues we look to for release and escapism.

.

.

.

Tell us means of connecting you and purchasing your music online.

My music is available in all the streaming services and you can purchase physicals on the website along with t-shirts and stickers and other fun stuff. I just got the Bashful Hips Facebook going a few months ago even though I’ve been doing this for years.

.

.

.

Let us know the greatest moment of your music career.

I got to open up for Serengeti in Nashville when he was doing the Yoni & Geti project. The dudes been my hero for over a decade and couldn’t have been nicer. I’ll never forget that.

.

.

.

Tell us the highest amount of money you have ever received from your music career and how it happened.

I apologize; I’m not going to talk about that. But I really appreciate show promoters who do guarantees on top of a door split, provide merch tables with lamps, feed and possibly house us.

.

.

.

Discuss your experience pertaining live performances, gigs, shows and tours.

I’ve toured a lot with Spoken Nerd. It’s tough touring but super rewarding. Food and showers is always kind of an issue. I prefer to play DIY house shows over venues or bars.

.

.

.

Tell us how you relate with your fans.

I think it’s a good scene of weirdo’s who like Bashful Hips. We relate on dark humor.

.

.

.

Tell us what you will like to change if you have the chance to turn back the hands of time.

I wish I started doing this social media thing back in 2012 instead of starting at the end of 2017.

.

.

.

Tell us the most important people that have boosted your music career and how you met them

Spoken Nerd (Nathan Conrad) has really gone out on a limb for me. My last album he put out on his label Invisible Library Records. I’d seen him play a bunch the first time I lived in Nashville. When I came back to Nashville the first thing I did was email him some songs and he started putting me on a bunch of bills. Solid dude.

.

.

.

Brief us on what you have in mind before considering music as a career.

You got to consider poverty which is so hard. I’m getting closer to thirty so I do play it safe now and have day jobs but I’ve used Medicaid and food stamps to get by. I personally have to have some sort of income coming in. I’ve worked in food service, non-profits, guitar companies and most recently been working in progressive politics which affords some time off because it’s cyclical.

.

.

.

Discuss your good and bad experience in life.

Good experiences are things like coffee, sex, fugazi, when your car starts, food, passwords to HBO Go…

Bad experiences are things like decaf, no sex, the grateful dead, car not starting, no food, no passwords for HBO Go…

.

.

.

Name the artists that have influenced the world.

Vanilla Ice. He made everyone uncomfortable.

.

.

.

Tell us about your moment of rejections as a musician and how you are able to cope and move on.

Damn, playing to five people can be totally awesome if they are into it but playing to five people who are on their phones sucks. I deal with rejection pretty well, if someone doesn’t like my art then cool, we can still be friends.

.

.

.

Tell us the most negative comment you have ever received about your music.

Hmmm…. In my old punk rock band, a porn magazine reviewed the record and said I deserved to be raped. I guess I don’t want to be that dude’s friend.

.

.

.

Tell us how to become a famous artist.

I don’t know. I’m not focused on that sort of thing. I’d love to just make a livable wage playing my music.

.

.

.

Tell us how you plan to make an impact on the society.

I want to do well. I recycle.

.

.

.

Elaborate on the recording process of this song.

It took me a year to do all the music for “People. Nature. Death.” which I recorded in Nashville. So when it came time to do the vocals, my contract was also up with my job so I moved to a meditation center up in the middle of nowhere for four months and spent about 8 hours a day writing lyrics and recording the vocals late at night. I spent a lot of time on this record in contemplation of my own mortality, the systems of society and nature.

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