Caleb Brown

Share your life story with us.

Originally from Cleveland, Ohio, I spent most of my childhood in Fort Myers, Florida. I began playing guitar at the age of 6, learning from my dad who is a songwriter as well. I took to it immediately and devoted most of my free time to developing my musical talents.

After high school I decided to pursue a nonmusical degree but quickly realized that I did not enjoy the pursuit of things non music related. I left school to do an Americorps program for 10 months all over the west coast and then moved to Atlanta, GA with my older brother. He and I currently remain in Atlanta, GA pursuing music.

Last June my mother tragically passed away. It was, and is, the hardest thing that has happened in my life. She was an incredible woman who made me much of the person I am today and gave me guidance throughout my life. I miss her dearly but also feel very grateful for her influence in my life and the time I had with her. She exposed me to a gambit of musical styles and I credit her with giving me the qualities and perspectives in music that set me aside as an artist.

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List the names of those that have assisted you so far in your music career and use this opportunity to thank them.

My older brother Josh Brown, who performs under the name Jack Muta, is an incredibly talented producer, musician, and rapper. He has helped me immensely in expanding the quality and content of my music and in defining the entirety of my style.

My parents are the reason I picked up music in the first place and the reason that I felt capable of pursuing it as a career. They’ve given me nothing but support since the day I was born.

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Narrate your experience while recording in the studio or while touring.

Recording has always been a love-hate relationship with me. I hate the tedium and logistics of it. I hate the feeling of going over something a million times to get it right. However, the feeling of picking that perfect guitar sound out on the pedal or the ideal countermelody to sing is remarkable. Of course, the finished product is so satisfying it makes the nitty gritty of the process well worth it.

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Go into detail about your songwriting process.

As my beginnings as an artist were on guitar, most of my songs start there. I’ll play a riff that catches my ear and I feel all the emotions of the song right then and there. The rest of the process is just trying to live up to it.

I often go straight to lyrics or sometimes flesh out the structure. It’s very rare I’ll finish production before the lyrics. Although, there are times where I’ll sing out just a line that strikes me and build from there. Those are usually some of the most striking lines.

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Brief us on what you have on the way for your fans out there.

I’m finishing production, recording and mixing on my next 5 song EP. The project is more in line with my ideal sound which is more natural and full than my last two projects. I’m working hard to grow as a musician while not letting my career fall by the wayside as I am certainly more interested in the playing and performing than anything else.

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Tell us what you are doing to increase your fan base.

I’m bad at everything to do with being a musician besides the music. In other words, I’m learning. I’m getting used to utilizing social media, which a lot more fun than I thought it would be, as well as seeking out online opportunities and setting up shows. I’m doing my best to be my own hype man but in practice it’s less like hype and more like casual mentions.

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Tell us a point in time that you just feel like giving up on your music career.

Always and never. I have a very innate sense of pessimism so that comes with regular bouts of self-doubt and futilism. That being said, every time that thought strikes me, I immediately recognize the joy that music brings me that’s unlike anything else in this world. I can’t see myself doing anything else and being entirely fulfilled.

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Go into detail on how you make your instrumentation or melody.

Melodies for me are often just sung atop the guitar until I’m struck with something. I often play lead over the chord structure to come up with a vocal tune. The instrumentation is always a dice roll. I do most of the instrumentation in my production myself but my brother will almost always do the drums and a lot of the keys work in my music.

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Tell us the best way to get in touch with you on social media.

My Instagram, while new is certainly the most active but I also regularly go on my Soundcloud as well as my Reverbnation:

@calebbrownatl

http://www.soundcloud.com/calebmbrown

http://www.reverbnation.com/calebbrownmusic

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Give us the links to your various stores.

https://calebbrownatl.bandcamp.com/

https://open.spotify.com/artist/47RRGrZbY8ug0xPRk0FWTb

https://itunes.apple.com/us/artist/caleb-brown/1324235197

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Tell us your favourite genre of music.

Blues is where it all started for me. My music is obviously influenced by pop, blues, jazz, and R&B but I love all roots music as well as pop, hip hop, and folk. Almost everything. The only music I don’t listen to very much is metal, EDM, and radio friendly country. Still, I appreciate many aspects from those latter genres.

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Tell us the subject matter of most of your songs.

Admittedly, almost all of my music falls into the two categories of ‘love’ and ‘introspection.’ However, my hope is that the music also expands beyond that to cover things like associated emotions, overarching ideas, irony, growth, and others.

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Tell us all we need to know about this song.

“Stuck In The Middle” is one of my favorite finished songs of mine because it represents my style very well as it combines R&B, pop, and jazz. It’s a song about the moment immediately following the end of a relationship. You assume your ex is doing great while you’re experiencing the sum of everything that you’ve invested into that time together disappears.

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Tell us what you think about digital distribution and streaming.

I think it’s a double edged sword. In one sense it’s an incredible tool to decrease the barriers to entry for music to be consumed by anyone with an electronic device which is great considering how expansive musical styles are becoming.

On the other hand, the companies who do it are often criticized with good reason for being unfair to artists. The monetization of art is tricky.

Also, I love vinyls, tapes, and CDs as they are such a romantically tangible way to listen to and own music.

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Tell us various ways that artists can boost their revenue.

Be active in your career. NOW. And in every avenue. Take the time to brainstorm ways to get exposure. Reach out to publications. Go to shows. Talk to musicians. Play out. Making connections begets more connections which snowballs into opportunities. It’s a lesson I wish to have learned a long time ago.

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Tell us your thought on self-training and going to educational institution to study music.

I think it’s completely dependent on the musician. In my opinion there are certain styles which lend themselves to formal training and expansive intellectual study. I would be on the side of educational institutions for improvement in music. That being said, taking a class on something like punk music seems counter intuitive.

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Go on at length on what it takes to write a hit song.

I don’t know how to write a hit song. I haven’t written a hit song. I do however have a lot of thoughts on the characteristics of a hit.

Pop music gets a lot of negative responses in the industry because of the process in which it is put together and because not every song on the radio is a hit by its own merit any more. In my opinion there’s nothing wrong with certain songs becoming iconically popular. There’s something incredible to me about being able to make a unique song with a familiar subject and an original take that resonates with people both sonically and lyrically. The people who sky rocket to fame out of nowhere by writing a hit song deserve it most of the time because it is an art in and of itself.

I try to put accessibility to entry and familiarity subjects into my songs because I love the idea of my music resonating in a simple yet distinct way.

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State the official date of release.

November 28th, 2017.

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State your artist’s name and elaborate on it.

Caleb Brown. I saw it on a sticker and liked the original sound of it because nobody has a name like that. So I changed it from Ferraro Sizzle to Caleb Brown.

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State the title of the song and the meaning.

“Stuck In The Middle” is a reference to being in the middle of the heartache. But also, “The Middle” refers to the mental state of still feeling like you’re in the middle of the relationship.

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State the title of the album and the reason for picking the title.

“Gettin On” is the name of the first track on the EP, but it also represents what this project was for me, which is a progression of my development as a musician both stylistically and mentally.

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