Rebecca Jayne

 

 

 

Discuss your personality.

Bubbly, outgoing and caring.

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Brief us about you as a musician. 

I sing and play guitar as well as a little bit of piano and banjo (although I mainly perform with a guitar). I first picked up a guitar at 10 years old and haven’t put it down since!

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Go into details on what have changed in your life for choosing music as a career.

My sleep pattern! I’m usually an early bird, but staying up until 12/1a.m to pack up after a gig takes its toll after a while!

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Tell us the benefits and drawbacks of choosing music as a career.

Benefits:

Getting to do what I love – writing songs, singing, playing instruments, meeting likeminded people.

 

Drawbacks:

Criticism given from strangers without being constructive.

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Tell us how you will manage fame as an established artist.

I think I could only tell you when/if it ever happens! I do not want fame at all, I’d just like to write songs and perform. Fame isn’t something that interests me at all.

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Tell us means of connecting you and purchasing your music online.

YouTube: rebeccajayneofficial

 

Facebook: rebeccajayneofficial

 

Instagram: rebeccajayneofficial

 

Rebecca Jayne is available on:

Apple Music, iTunes, Amazon and Spotify.

 

Physical CDs can be purchased from my website and many more.

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Let us know the greatest moment of your music career.

Performing at The Bluebird Cafe in Nashville, Tennessee. I’ve been a fan of country music and Nashville for most of my life and to play at such an iconic venue was a dream come true. What made it even better was that they asked me for an encore!

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Discuss your experience pertaining live performances, gigs, shows and tours.

I love live performances, not only performing myself, but watching other people perform. The hardest part of live performance gigs is getting people to come out and support local live music.

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Tell us how you relate with your fans.

I relate through my music. I’ve always found with the artists I love that I connect with them through their songs. If they’ve had an experience and written a song about it you can always tell. They’re the ones that seem to connect with their audiences the best and that’s how I hope I relate with my fans.

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Tell us what you will like to change if you have the chance to turn back the hands of time.

I wouldn’t really change anything. I’m a true believer in learning from your mistakes. If I never made mistakes then I’d never know what I truly want.

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Tell us the most important people that have boosted your music career and how you met them.

My family has been there from day one and has never left my side. They’ve boosted it in supporting me and spreading the word about my music as much as possible.

 

My manager Alex Ford has helped me considerably in getting a lot more gigs, festivals and radio interviews. He also introduced me to my most recent producer Luke Batt who I work very well with.

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Brief us on what you have in mind before considering music as a career.

In the past few months of taking my music more seriously, my motto is to just give it a go. If you don’t put yourself out there and give it as best shot as you can then you can never say that you really tried! It’s not great money when you’re starting out, but that’s why so many musicians out there get other jobs like waitressing to support themselves. If you really want it then you’ll find a way.

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Name the artists that have influenced the world.

For me I’d say: Taylor Swift, Bob Dylan, Willie Nelson, Beyonce.

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Tell us about your moment of rejections as a musician and how you are able to cope and move on.

It’s not easy! The best way I find is to think ‘well it’s their loss’. If they’re not even willing to give people a chance then they’re the ones missing out! Just don’t get obnoxious like so many musicians do haha!

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Tell us the most negative comment you have ever received about your music.

I honestly can’t remember. I’ve had comments saying ‘You’re not really my style’ or ‘I would’ve done that differently’, but I generally find they’re very rare. Either people make a conscious effort to make a nice comment to me or don’t say anything at all.

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Elaborate on the recording process of this song.

I recorded the vocal and guitar in one take and then my producer Luke Batt worked his magic adding some piano. It still isn’t completely finished, but it’s nearly there!

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State your artist’s name and elaborate on it.

Rebecca Jayne.

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State the title of the song and the meaning.

“I’m Not Saying I Don’t Love You”- I once was involved with someone who I convinced myself I was in love with. I wanted the relationship to work for quite a while, but as time passed I realised it didn’t work. Over that time I did learn to love him, but more as a friend or brother rather than a partner. It’s about telling someone that you do love them, but not necessarily in the way the other person would like you to.

Nick de la Hoyde

NICK DE LA HOYDE

Sydney, Australia based singer/songwriter/rapper Nick de la Hoyde began expressing himself through music when he was 16 while pursuing a professional, football career in Barcelona. Music quickly became a driving force in Nick’s life and through that creative lens; he began to express his deeply personal thoughts of being a determined teenager chasing his dreams in a foreign land. This early creativity eventually won out and brought him back to Australia to pursue being an artist full-time. Growing up in a multi-cultural home with a Syrian mother and British father, Nick was exposed to many global influences which he weaved into his music melding his love of hip hop and R&B with electronic alt/dance beats together with introspective lyrics that chronicled a young, musician’s journey to adulthood overcoming life and artistic challenges along the path.  Nick and his long-time producer/collaborator/older brother Joseph (ZUZU) de la Hoyde, have crafted a sound that is simultaneously intimate, expansive and engaging. Now at 23, Nick has penned confessional, real life anthems such as Love Takes TimeThinking Bout You, Never Gonna Beg For It, By My Side and Changing that oscillate between moody, textured R&B and anthemic synth laden future-pop moments combined with a lyrical earnestness that speaks directly to today’s younger generation.  Nick has quickly made a name for himself, cultivating a large and dedicated on-line following and becoming a powerful voice for youth empowerment and positivity.

 

https://www.nickdelahoyde.com/

Carmine Russotti

Carmine Russotti has a fine educational background!

He studied music education and has a MA in Music Composition, a Music Teacher Certification New York State, & has a Tenured Teaching License in Orchestral Music – New York City.

Carmine has an extensive background in music performance both as a leader and performer.

Performance Experience: Three of a Kind Orchestra, Freelance Musician, Hunter College Orchestra, Hunter College Jazz Band, Alex Maysonet Ensemble, Normie Wayne Music, Larry Charles Big Band, Various performances in off Broadway musicals: Fiddler On The Roof, Anything Goes, Guys & Dolls, etc. Gloria Praise Team, W.O.W., Tony C & The Nose Pickers, + various ensembles in the New York City Public School System.

Carmine Russotti worked in the New York City public school system for 27 years as a music educator. He has taught, conducted and has been the director of a variety of music and other disciplines including: the Jazz Band, Marching Band, Orchestra, Beginner & Intermediate Ensembles and other various music ensembles.

He has taught music theory, piano, beginners band and beginners orchestra, intermediate band and orchestra, brass, woodwind, percussion classes, music appreciation, mixed and girls choruses.

Also, he worked as an adjunct professor at Hunter College teaching Percussion skills to Master Classes.

He started writing songs when he was 14 years old; writing both the music & lyrics. He has written & performed music in many genres. His eclectic tastes spans from Classical to Jazz to Popular Music.
He has now started a project including Pop, Dance, Hip-Hop & Rap! He has been working with Tony Coluccio @globalmediamusic for the production of his music.

 

https://store.cdbaby.com/cd/carminerussotti2

 

Jody Direen

JODY DIREEN RELEASES HER 4TH SINGLE FROM “SHAKE UP”

WINNER OF THE RECORDED MUSIC NZ BEST COUNTRY MUSIC ALBUM 2017

PERFORMING AT CMC ROCKS 2018

 

Jody Direen is the most exciting country pop rock artists to come out of New Zealand in recent years. Hailing from the heart of the South Island (Wanaka), Jody has made a significant impact on the local music scene.  Pairing her amazing vocal talent along with her gifted song writing skills, powerful stage presence, hard work ethic and determination, Jody has garnered a loyal following throughout New Zealand and Australia. Nominated two years in a row for NZ Best Country Album, Jody won this year for her current album “Shake Up”.

 

In Australia, Jody has released three previous singles off the current album, ‘Gimme The Beat’ and “Dirt Rich’ and the powerful ballad, “Fight”. All these singles have headed straight up our country charts; with the first 2 singles impacting the Top 10 on the National Country Airplay and CMC chart. Now Jody drops her fourth single, Spitfire.

As Jody describes the single, “Spitfire is the ultimate party song. I wrote this on my birthday after attending an airshow to celebrate. There were Spitfire war planes flying around the sky, the sound and atmosphere their presence created was so amazing which sparked the inspiration behind the name of the song. I went home and wrote the song, fuelled by a few red wines!

 

 I wanted it to be a BIG song, with production elements inspired by that huge 80’s rock ‘wall of guitars’ vibe…think Def Leopard with a country twist. I wrote it from the standpoint of asking myself; ‘what is the ultimate song to be moshing up the front at a festival and singing at the top of my voice to?’. So its about lighting the night up, living in the moment, and care-free loving. Life is short and weekends are for making memories!”

 

I wanted the video to involve my fans that I love so dearly! A documentary style video was a no-brainer there. I’ve always wanted to shoot a video that gives an insight into life on the road and to show the #1 part the fans are in this entire live music journey!”

 

Re-locating to Australia in late 2016, Jody released ‘Shake Up’ in November 2016 after touring with The Wolfe Brothers on the This Crazy Life Tour. A new sound for Jody, ‘Shake Up’ is filled with anthems and big beats that have been influenced by 80’s and 90’s rock, combined with popular club synths, banjo, steel and massive country guitars.

 

Catch Jody performing “Spitfire” at CMC Rocks in March!

For more tour dates and information go to:

 

Website

 

ABC Music

Artemisia

Tell us your real names and country of birth.

Sara Shields-Rivard, Canada.

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Tell us your academic qualification.

Studying music in university, specializing in classical/ contemporary voice.

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Tell us about your music career, band name, musical background, experience and skills.

I have been in multiple bands over the years, such as Northern Coda, but have finally decided to do my own thing. I currently sing backup for Edwin Raphael and Colin Weeks, and have worked on music with NOVA and Pat di Meo. My stage name Artemisia was inspired by one of my favourite female painters of the 16th-17th century, named Artemisia Gentileschi. Her art has not only inspired me, through her unique representation of women at the time, but also through her life story.

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Tell us about your genre, concept and idea behind your music video and the song.

I write mostly indie/pop/R&B music about queer love, with musical influences such as Florence & The Machine, Amy Winehouse, Charlotte Cardin, etc.

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Tell us how to run a record label independently and successfully based on your experience as an artist.

I think getting good artists and musicians to collaborate and network is important to running an indie music label, as much as social media, promoting and marketing.

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Tell us how you are promoting your music.

I am promoting my music through Instagram, Facebook, as well as through various music blogs. I play live shows around Montreal as well and plan on selling merch soon.

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Tell us what makes you happy and what makes you sad.

Love makes me happy, but it can also make me just as sad. Whether it’s self-love, love from your family, your partner, or even your cat.

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Explain clearly the story or concept behind the song.

“Girl” is a coming of age story about exploring sexuality and, when I, personally, understood that I didn’t need a man to be happy or complete.

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List the radio stations, TV stations and blogs that have aired or featured your new song.

Smoke Radio (London), so far.

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Give us links to where the song can be purchased.

 

Bandcamp

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Tell us about other members of your band, music producer, crew or music video director, how the song was recorded and how the music video was shot.

I worked with Andreas Koliakoudakis at Kingsway Studios in Montreal to record, mix, master and produce this song. Initially I wrote it just at the piano with lots of backup vocals and with the intention of adding strings, but he also suggested adding bass, drum and guitar to it, which took the song in a completely different direction. I’ve known him for a long time and he knows what I like and what I don’t, what I’m good at and what I’m not, etc. I trust him entirely and he always does an amazing job at bringing me to my fullest potential.

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Tell us how long you have been in the music industry, your experience and your future goal.

I have been studying music since I was little, but only decided to take my own music seriously this year and take complete creative control of my musical output. My goal is to make music that makes people jam out to, but also chill and make them feel things. I love songwriting, recording and vocal arranging and would love to work in the music industry for the rest of my life, whether it is in a studio, behind the scenes or on stage.

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Tell us what makes you unique from others.

What makes me unique is the kind of sounds that I blend together in my music. I’ve asked people how they would define my music, and no one could come up with anything. I love orchestral sounds and epic drums, but also pop and rock music. I think the fact that I’m a little over the map sonically makes my music different. I also talk about my queer relationships, which you don’t hear very often.

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Tell us your weakness and strength pertaining music.

My weakness is my solo performance anxiety for sure, and my strength is creating vocal harmonies.

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List your five favourite songs including the artists.

Currently, my favourite songs are:

“Rhiannon” – Fleetwood Mac / Stevie Nicks,

“Heartbreaker” – Pat Benatar,

“Make Me Feel” – Janelle Monae,

“IDGAF” – Dua Lipa,

“Bellyache” – Billie Eilish.

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Tell us your position on “DIY” Do It Yourself” and signing to a major label.

I think there’s advantage to both a DIY approach and signing to a label. There’s a lot more pressure to create content that will sell when you’re with a label, but they also market you and get you exposure, which is crucial to a career in music, whereas you have a lot more creative freedom as an independent artist. Personally, I like being an indie artist because I can explore so many different musical avenues without any pressure or expectations, but I think one day, I might be ready to move up and sign to a label.

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Tell us other activities you will like to pursue apart from music.

I am currently studying Art History and enjoy multimedia art, sound art and collaging. I also write poems in my spare time. I’d like to find a way that they can intersect and to do all of them in one space.

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List your various works.

 

“Girl” – Artemisia,

 

“Something Like Us” – Artemisia,

 

“Untempered” – Northern Coda,

 

“Miss the Sun” – Edwin Raphael,

 

“Kodak” – Edwin Raphael.

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State links to connect you on social media.

 

Instagram

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State the official date of release.

March 23, 2018.

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State your artist’s name and elaborate on it.

Artemisia; inspired by the 17th century Italian painter.

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State the title of the song and the meaning.

“Girl”. The song is about queer love and realizing you don’t have to be in love with just one kind of person. Sexuality is fluid!

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State the title of the album and the reason for picking the title.

The EP will be self-titled, because it is a debut EP. I want people to know who I am, what I’m about and what I’ve gone through (self-discovery, long distance relationship, breakup, sexual assault, etc.), and this EP says it all.

Evan Cline

Tell us if your work is 100 percent original or you take little from other artists’ works in a creative way.

I think every artist takes a little bit from other artists they stream or listen to daily. I like to think “Secrets” is the most organic version of me fit into 3 minutes and change.

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Tell us if you are into music because of the passion for it or you are a gifted artist.

I’ve always enjoyed challenges and with music learning the piano and guitar by ear are things that still drive me. Songwriting is a passion in itself so with a little bit of talent and a ton of passion, you usually end up on the right path.

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Elaborate on how you ensure the quality of your sound.

I’m extremely fortunate to track and cut all of my work on my own with my own gear. I’m the kid who’s on YouTube on Friday night looking up how to EQ acoustic guitars differently or something crazy like that. I’m always trying to learn from people better than me, which ensures growth on my end when it comes to my material over time.

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Tell us how you come across ideas to develop your songs.

I think I fall in love with melodies more than ideas for songs. It’s easy for me to sit at a piano and try different chords, patterns and throw a vocal melody on top. Then lyrics to follow. I realized very quickly as a songwriter you only have so many life experiences you can write about. Soon enough you have to be able to write about an experience you’ve never had, and make other people believe you did.

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Describe your vocal ability.

Well I believe there are things I’m more comfortable with vocally. I find falsetto stuff to come more naturally maybe than other guys. But I also marvel in a lot of other male vocalists who do things that I wouldn’t attempt (haha).

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Tell us the process involved in developing the instrumentation for this song.

For songwriting I always start on the piano for the most part. Once I have a part figured out I’ll try and write and finish the song stripped with lyrics done. These days it’s so easy to build songs through software, when I write a song that works with just an acoustic guitar or piano, I know I’m probably onto something.

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State five songs that you think are hit songs and name the artists. 

There’s nothing holding me back – Shawn Mendes

 

Ocean’s Away – A R I Z O N A

 

Unforgettable – Thomas Rhett

 

Attention – Charlie Pugh

 

Secrets – Evan Cline 😉

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Tell us how you entertain audience during live performance.

I use a 3 track looper while playing live. So building songs that way through the point of view of the audience; I always find them entertained even before I sing the first note. It’s a great experience and for someone who enjoys having control of how each performance will go, looping is the perfect solution.

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List the name of artists that have similar sound to yours.

Ed Sheeran

 

Shawn Mendes

 

John Mayer

 

Nick Jonas

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Discuss how you think your music is having an impact on your fans.

I think my music is controlled and designed on purpose to make people feel something. I’m a huge lyric guy, so when I hear strong lyrics like an “All Too Well” by Taylor Swift it makes me feel something. I try to incorporate commercial instrumentals with really strong lyrics with hopes that it’ll help me stand out.

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Tell us what inspires you to sing.

Again, the mystery in building a song from scratch really inspires me. The chorus I come up with always sounds better once a song is near its end production wise. A great production to a song really gives me an extra boost when cutting a vocal.

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Discuss the recording process of this song.

I wrote SECRETS on the floor of my studio one rainy morning. The acoustic lock is so memorable in my mind. It’s something someone can play and say “wait that’s secrets” I had a notebook filled with “single” type songs already. I cut everything in Philadelphia with a basic beat and instrumental behind it. I went to Nashville to finish the song and it really came alive when Chris Kimmerer (drummer/band leader for Thomas Rhett) stepped in and expressed his belief in the song. He sat with it a couple weeks and produced the song in full, the rest was history.

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Discuss how you develop your melody.

I do use a couple formulas for my melodies and I don’t want to reveal too much, but sometimes detaching from the plan and just singing different stuff that just feels right is the way to go for me.

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Discuss the standard of your production.

I tend to care about production very much as someone who mixes and masters their own music most of the time. You get what you pay for in this business. I believe in spending the last dollar in my wallet that day if it’s going to take the song to another level.

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Tell us how you master your songs after production.

I tend to master while I mix. Sometimes I’ll throw a PSP vintage warmer on my master with an SSL Bus compressor to start getting some levels. I’ll make adjustments from there and then add the rest of my mastering chain once mix levels are feeling really good.

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Discuss how you get your songs to digital stores.

Tunecore.

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Brief us on source of income through music.

By playing live is a great place to start over selling digitally in my mind.

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Tell us your piece of advice to a new artist.

Get on YouTube, start owning your craft. Whether you want to perform, be a session player, or engineer. There is so much information out there. Oh and also, put down the XBOX controller, and pick up a guitar.

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State your favourite radio station.

Q102 (Philadelphia).

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State the links to connect you and your stores. 

Apple Music: Evan Cline

 

Spotify: Evan Cline

 

YouTube: YouTube.com/user/theEcline

 

Instagram: @cline.evan

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Go into details on this song.

This song means a ton to me; it has this sexy, mysterious upbeat feel about it. I’ve probably heard it at least a million times prior to release and every time I pick up an acoustic to play it, I’m still not sick of it. It has a place for the average listener, or the next Jeep commercial, or maybe a reality show down the road. I see it from an outside perspective and aside from it being catchy; I hope it can exist in those spaces mentioned.

Kristen

Discuss the composition of this song. 

“Therapy” started out as a statement I wrote down on a sheet of notebook paper, which I sat down on my desk for about a week. I had been processing the events that had happened to me in the past year—a move back from a crowded life in Nashville, TN to Midwestern Indianapolis, IN, several family deaths, and a regional tour during which (unbeknownst to me at the time) I was battling mono. I had spent an entire year feeling defeated, exhausted, and creatively drained. I felt like I needed therapy, so instead of going to therapy, I decided to capture that emotion in a song.

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State the name of your producer and elaborate on the production of the song.

My producer, Jon Class of the Varsity Recording Co., is a wizard. When we originally met up for pre-production, it became clear that keeping the sound organic, authentic, and vintage was the top priority. Jon brought in a variety of players to give their own flare to the track, each contributing to our original vision while taking the music to the next level. We drew from elements and influence from the bands Vulpeck, Alabama Shakes, and Lake Street Dive.

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Go into details on the lyrics of the song. 

When I see myself in the mirror, I can picture my old self: someone consumed with a busy lifestyle, making a living, becoming successful, looking good—things that led me to a place I would rather forget. No matter how many times I look in the mirror, I’ll still catch remnants of a past self that I’d rather forget—but I chose to not keep that life in tow. “Cause every time I look in the mirror, I see your face a little more clearer, you left a part of you with me, whether you like it or not—get out of my head.”

 

The entire song is an ode to my past self, but not in the way you might imagine. It’s coming to the realization that there are parts of me that I really hate, and building up the courage to face those parts of me so that I can keep moving forward.

 

“My wish for you is nothing more than what you deserve, that every sign and page would write your name off the Earth”

 

There aren’t a lot of lyrics in the song, but that was intentional—I wanted to keep it simple and straightforward. Oftentimes when I sing the chorus it’s almost like a chant to keep that part of myself away, but other nights it feels like more of a declaration.

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Elaborate on your music career. 

Back in 2012 I released my first self-titled EP under my maiden name, Kristen Bennett. I was a sophomore in college, and fronted a folk rock, pop band. I spent several years playing regularly in the Ohio River Valley. Being a native of Dayton, Ohio I had grown up learning jazz guitar from a local musician who would bring me out to his jazz gigs. It was an incredible experience to have at such a young age, and I am still so grateful for the opportunity I had to learn from such a renowned jazz guitarist.

 

In 2013 I released my sophomore EP “Someone Else’s Eyes” as a tribute to my late grandparents and the impact they had on my life. I played regularly throughout my college town, Anderson, Indiana, and came home on weekends to play shows with my hometown band. I spent that year writing music for an indie flick, Titans of PS-271 and collaborating with filmmakers to create a fantastic soundtrack.

 

In 2014-2015 I moved to Nashville, TN and participated in a three month showcase at the Contemporary Music Center, several months full of weekday gigs, writing in the studio, and production prep working up to a regional tour at the end of the season. I moved to Nashville preceding that experience, taking a short hiatus from the folk project, Kristen Bennett music.

 

In 2017 I revamped my music with “Merry Little EP” a collection of jazz inspired Christmas covers, recorded in a very chill, living room setting. I spent the rest of that year cultivating a new sound, a new image, and a completely new brand: “Kristen”. We recorded three consecutive singles, one of which was the latest release “Therapy”.

 

“Therapy” ushers in a new era for the band, a metamorphosis of the old folk number to a groovy band inspired by the likes of Elle King, Alabama Shakes, and Lake Street Dive. We love an insatiable groove, big guitars, and a soulful vibe.

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Brief us on how you are reaching fans with your music. 

I love my fans! I like to keep a good balance of social media and connecting through live shows. I play regularly in Indianapolis, but I also venture out to Cincinnati, Nashville, Louisville, Chicago, and northern Indiana. I love meeting new faces, old friends, and new fans at every show—but I also am a social media addict. I think it’s awesome to connect via Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter. I love to actually engage in those who really care about my music, and I feel like it’s the best I can do in return for such amazing support for the music I love to make.

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Discuss your motive behind making music. 

Aside from not knowing how to do anything else—or being too stubborn to do anything but make some headway and simply make my path music—I love creating. I want to make something new that people can engage in, but also best represents what I know. I believe that I can be the most transparent version of myself when I’m making music, whether in a writing session, catching up with co-writers, talking with promoters, or waiting backstage. I want the music I make to inspire others; but even more than that, I hope that I can be remembered as someone who loved well and lived kindly through every interaction I make within my musical career.

 

So I guess if I had to sum it all up in one brief explanation: to connect with people in an organic, authentic way.
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Discuss the process of your songwriting. 

I like to set up an environment to song write — I’m a big fan of having a rhythm (no pun intended) especially when it comes to developing and generating ideas. I wake up before 10am, usually between 6-8am. The thoughts I have first thing in the morning are unfiltered and open, it leaves a lot of room for my brain to be flexible. I set aside a couple of hours, and gather ideas from quotes, pictures, and books I’ve been reading. I fill a few pages or so with a brainstorm, and start to strum out a progression I feel like fits the mood of the collection of my thoughts. After I settle in on a hook (or perhaps just a start), the lyrics tend to compliment the mood and structure of the song.

 

After this process I get a lot more specific about the song—I’ll draw outlines, make production notes, re-write lines, etc.

 

After about an hour or so I’ll hash out a melody that I feel is appropriate.

 

I’m always open to re-writing or letting a song hang around a few weeks before I move forward in the process. All good things take time, and good music is not an exception that value.

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Brief us about your work and achievement so far in your music career. 

When I was younger I began my musical career during guitar lessons—my guitar teacher took me along to play at local jazz guitar festivals and smaller, intimate gigs where I truthfully learned how to engage during a concert setting. Being an avid writer already (I enjoyed writing poems, short stories, and even started writing some of my own books) I quickly found ways to put words I had written to songs, which became a culmination of my first EP, a self-titled release in 2012.

 

I re-located to Indianapolis for college, in pursuit of a music business degree. I learned a whole new aspect of the industry, while growing in my own knowledge of my instrument. I played locally throughout college, with several different college bands as well as my own bandmates.

 

As I grew in my knowledge of the business and cultivated my songwriting skills, I felt like I needed to release more music. We recorded a few tunes in the infamous Gaither Studios in Alexandria, IN, a space treasured by musical legends such as Sandi Patti and Michael English. In the fall of 2014 I released “Someone Else’s Eyes” an EP dedicated to the love I saw between my grandparents. I spent the year playing on weekends throughout the Ohio River Valley, and finished off the year coordinating a soundtrack of my own songs for an indie film, “Titans of PS-271”. I continued to grow in my ingenuity of the music business, and worked tirelessly to volunteer my time and effort to create strategic marketing plans for several local bands. Later that year I received the NAMM Presidential Innovation Award for music business excellence.

 

To cap off my senior year, I moved to Nashville to fulfill an internship at the Contemporary Music Center. I spent an entire season writing, recording, performing weekly showcases, and learning the ins and outs of the music industry. We finished off the internship with a regional tour and I came off the road with five studio recordings. In the summer of 2015 I moved to Nashville, TN working three jobs—booking agent, part-time sales associate, and tour manager. It was a busy, crowded life, but I was completely plugged into the industry in a 24-7 kind of way.

 

As January rolled around, I began to reevaluate my life. I hadn’t written any songs since I had been out of school and felt like I was consumed with my work. I moved back to Indiana to pursue a part-time teaching job, which eventually turned into a full-time music directing, vocal coaching, and producing gig. I started to write and didn’t have any intention of stopping. I made a promise to myself to start utilizing my booking skills for my own musical career, and actual use the knowledge of the business I had gathered for an entirely new project. In December of 2016 I released “Merry Little EP” on a whim—a short collection of Christmas covers with a jazz twist, complete with a warm, living room feel. That release kickstarted 2017.

 

What was original “Kristen Bennett Music” a folk group with tendencies towards pop, rock, and mainstream, became simply “Kristen” a collection of music that came from my roots in jazz and blues. I spent that spring in the studio recording “Therapy”, a groovy, vintage track capturing the essence of my experience in Nashville. That summer I spent every weekend on the road, playing 2-3 shows per weekend throughout the Midwest in Chicago, Nashville, Dayton, Cincinnati, Cleveland, South Bend, and more.

 

This year marks a metamorphosis of the old sound into an entirely new era. The band has transformed, and the music has as well. This year we will be releasing an additional two singles and taking to the road to promote the music.

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Tell us your opinion on using rhymes dictionary or writing software to develop lyrics.

I know it’s cliché, but I love to use Thesaurus.com to get my words flowing. Even when crafting an e-mail, when I’m at a loss for words I pull the website up in my browser. When I was younger and thrived on writing books, poems, and the like, I used a handheld Thesaurus to spring inspiration when I lacked the motivation.

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Discuss what is old and what is new in the music industry as in overall changes. 

The music industry is changing on a daily basis, and it has since the internet came to be. The way we access music, the structure in which we create it—even the accessibility to the tools needed to create a hit record.

 

Anyone can release and record a record, which not only has expanded the depths of the music industry but also forced the business to change the way you can market, promote, and fashion a brand.

 

Being a teacher, I watch my students create and disperse music in ways I’ve never seen before. The ingenuity behind this new generation of musicians in infectious, and gives me hope that no matter the amount of change the music industry undergoes, there will still be a culture of raw, unadulterated, successful talent.
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Elaborate on how you prepare yourself for a recording session. 

I practice.

 

As much as I love the spontaneous, raw cut of a new song, I like to take the time to run through my songs before I get into a studio space. I don’t want to run the risk of wasting time cutting vocal tracks over and over again, or put the time and effort of my team in jeopardy.

 

I put a lot of thought into pre-production and taking the time to shape an idea and let it sit and cultivate before venturing into the studio. I want to produce something that best represents my original idea when I sat down to craft the song, but also create music that’s relevant and interesting to the listener’s ear.

 

I also try and spend the weeks up to the recording preserving my voice and getting an adequate amount of sleep (never take those hours for granted!) to put on an adequate performance to do the music justice.
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Brief us on your preference in terms of tempo as in up-tempo, mid-tempo or slow tempo. 

Does a swung tempo count?

 

I’m a jazz guitarist, I swing everything. I think every musician has a natural groove that they feel most comfortable in, perhaps something that was practiced over and over again when they first picked up an instrument until it became ingrained in their subconscious.

 

I would say, if anything mid-tempo is my wheelhouse. I can swing it; I can take the time to make the vocal interesting without losing its authenticity, and really sink into the tempo.

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Discuss your shows or live performance. 

I love recording, but I believe the best way to reach fans is through a live performance. Some bands only spend a couple days performing for a tour, but I take quite a few weeks to process, practice, and think through our live show.

 

I want to engage in an experience fans and friends will remember, and not just show up to play my songs—that’s nothing new if they’ve heard the recordings already. I put all that I have into my live performance, from the energy exerted during the show to the preparation leading up to it. I make it a point to invest in every person that shows up to support the show, too. I want to make the live show a memorable experience, to whatever audience or room we play in.

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Discuss working as a full time or part time musician. 

I split my time as a musician up as a teacher and an independent singer/songwriter, and I love it. Oftentimes, I learn more from the kids I teach then they learn from me—it keeps me on my toes as a musician, but also allows the growth I need as a guitar player and a singer. I’m constantly singing—taking students through warm-ups, explaining vocal technique, and looking for better ways to teach and reach my students. I like to study before I implement a teaching, but I also put those things I teach into practice on the road.
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Send a message across to your fans and supporters. 

I cannot thank you enough for your support and encouragement throughout my entire musical career. Whether you’ve been there since “Kristen Bennett Music” or just joined me for the journey, thank you for lending me your ears. I hope that no matter what place in life you’re at, that I can keep making music that engages, connects, and entertains.
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Discuss the story line of the song. 

When I came home from Nashville, I carried a lot of baggage. I spent an entire year consumed a busy life, but also experienced four deaths in my family over the course of two years. I remember coming home that year to two consecutive funerals, literally a week apart. A lot was going on in my life, and before even beginning to create the music I took out a sheet of paper and wrote down “Therapy”.

 

I knew at the time I needed therapy, but instead I just decided to write that statement down, so I would remember that place I was in. Months later, I came back to that sheet of paper and decided to write a song about my experience.

 

I didn’t want to make the lyrics very specific, hoping that I could reach a broader emotion with the kind of emotion I was having.
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Tell us what makes this song unique from others. 

This song is built on musical layers. In the opening few lines the instrumentation is sparse, but the bass, drums, and guitar establish an insatiable groove. As the hook cuts into the chorus, the audible layers build with vocal harmony, keys, and organ.

 

The breakdown was meant to sound like the inside of a brain during a therapy session: phased-out talking, a far-out guitar solo–it feels like you’re out in space.

 

“Get out of my head” can be taken so many ways, but I feel like musically, the song captures that lyric in an interesting way.

 

Plus, it’s got a vintage, groovy vibe that sticks with you long after the track is over.

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Tell us the subject matter of most of your composition. 

I love to write from my own experience, the things I know the best. I enjoy writing a storyline, but for the most part, I sneak in some sort of experience I’ve had in hopes that it will resonate with the listener’s own experience.
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Tell us the official date of release. 

The single was released on February 11th, 2018.
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State the links to your social media and stores. 

 

Website

 

Instagram

 

Twitter

 

Facebook

 

Spotify

 

Store

September Eighteenths

Tell us your favourite instruments.

Vocals, for sure. Big fans of singing. We also love the drums. Neither Jackson nor I play, but we very much wish we could.

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List the names of those supporting you.

Moms, dads, brothers, sisters, friends. Our friend and producer, Carl Culley, has been extremely helpful and supportive. Tons of people.

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Tell us your preferred musical styles.

Definitely indie/folk/pop. Anything in that realm. Things with heavy focus on the vocals, and lyrics. Indie/folk music also feels like it’s not trying to copy anything. It’s always very original.

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List the name of five artists that have influenced you musically.

Damien Rice, Hozier, Weezer, Panic! At The Disco, Marc Broussard.

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Tell us your favourite food and hobby.

Favorite food- mashed potatoes. Love them.

Hobby- probably reading. Typically I read a book a week. I think it’s the best education you can get.

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Tell us if you smoke and drink alcohol.
I do drink, no smoking.

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Tell us your musical experience pertaining the recording of this song.

This was the first song Jackson and I ever wrote together over a year ago. It’s very strange to revisit it, especially with the growth we have had as musicians and artists. It’s always strange to look back at past work.

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Explain what you know about vocal training.

Jackson knows everything, literally everything. He is a vocal coach under one of the best vocal coaches in the country. I have taken voice from both of them actually. I know a decent amount, but Jackson is the vocal encyclopedia.

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Discuss the use of live instruments for recording in the studio.
We try to do everything live. Obviously there are some soundscape effects on there that are computer generated, but for the most part, live instruments. Recorded one at a time. We don’t record everything at the same time.

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Brief us about your songwriting process.

It’s a long, developing process, that’s been evolving since we started. We are typically story song writers. So we flush out the story pretty heavily up front, and then start working on a chord progression with which we start humming random things for melodies. It’s usually easiest when we find a hook, and then build off of that. But always story first.

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Tell us your other talents apart from singing.
We’re both pretty decent at anything athletic. Jackson is a damn good runner. I do a solid amount of weight lifting and fighting.

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Tell us your future plans in terms of your music career.
Keep releasing singles, and slowly bring in some more collaborators. Do some solid live session videos, and then start thinking about a 2-3 week tour.

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Tell us your worst experience in your music career.

We’ve not had many horrible experiences. Though we’ve definitely had some rough shows. Just ill prepared.

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Discuss sexual harassment in the music industry.
It shouldn’t be there. We haven’t had any experience with that.

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Discuss in details all we need to know about your song and album.

It’s a pretty simple concept. Probably our simplest. You can listen to it, and understand that it’s about taking control of your own life, and not following any preset path that either you or others have laid down for you.

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Tell us what fans are saying about your music.

Well if they are our fans, they like it! We mostly get comments about our vocals and lyrics.

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Discuss multi-genre and switching from one genre to another.
I think it’s very healthy to be pretty genre fluid. If someone is trying too hard to fit into a genre, their music won’t be at all original.

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State the links to your stores and website.
Right now we would just love for you to check out ‘September Eighteenths’ on Spotify and Apple Music!!

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Explain in detail the title of the song.
‘Slowing Down’. Meaning taking a step back from your day to day, and really pondering who you are, and what you are doing, and whether you are moving in the direction you want to be moving in.

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Tell us the official date of release.
21st February 22, 2018.

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State the reason you are into music.
It’s a way to tell stories.