Jeremy Parsons - Why Is The Bluebird Blue

Jeremy Parsons – Why Is The Bluebird Blue

 

 

 

 

Jeremy Parsons - Why Is The Bluebird Blue

Jeremy Parsons – Why Is The Bluebird Blue

 

 

 

 

Jeremy Parsons – Why Is The Bluebird Blue

 

 

 

Jeremy is originally from Texas, and now resides in Nashville, TN. “Why is the Bluebird Blue” is a Top 30 Roots Music Report hit, and the video has been selected by some of the festivals.

 

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Discuss the story behind your music video.

“Why Is the Bluebird blue?”

I’d love to. My best friend/photographer/videographer Pj Schenkel of Three Hat Media and myself were sitting down and discussing the next possible single idea off my record “Things I Need To Say.” It was an instantaneous agreement and shared idea that “Why Is The Bluebird Blue” was the undeniable choice. We immediately took to planning it out. One key element we both really wanted, both as fans of cartoons, was animation. So with that in mind, we set out to make the video centered around the perspective of the bird coming up on us having a reflective moment. To us, it was the bird connecting with a person on a set of emotions. The longing and the remorse but with the inability to fly away from our problems. Pj rented all the equipment and we had 24 hours to knock the project out. It was a bit colder then we’d hoped but it ended up adding this really “chilling” vibe to the whole shoot which was perfect. We shot the night scenes at about 3 a.m. in the morning and just let the day play out from there. It worked out perfectly and Pj’s post-production magic and genius really brought the whole concept and song together. We can’t wait to work on the next video and share it with y’all.

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State the name of the locations in your music video.

Location one was my backyard in East Nashville. Location two was an abandoned Gas Station we found while cruising around with our buddy Ben Flanders out in Hendersonville, TN. Location 3 was Tin Roof off of Demonbreun Street in Midtown Nashville. One of my favorite bars in town and a great place to meet folks and network.

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List the members of the crew that produced this video and use this opportunity to thank them.

The video was directed/produced/edited by PJ Schenkel of and for Three Hat Media. The Assistant Camera/Production Assistant for the Tin Roof scene was Colin Flora. The artwork for the Bluebird was done by our good buddy Michael Lane. I can’t thank them all enough for bringing this wonderful project to life and being on board with the vision from the start. I’m infinitely grateful for them and their talents.

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Explain your emotional state while shooting the music video.

My emotional state was very positive and pleased. I love what I do and I love working on shareable art that people can connect with. This is a song that means a lot to me because a lot of people have really reached out and connected with it and me even prior to the video shoot. Luckily because of the cold weather, I was able to look more sad and disturbed. I’m not used to the cold after spending 21 years growing up in San Antonio. Another factor that helped was we stayed up all night filming it. So as the person within the song was dealing, Pj and I were dealing as well. I feel like we were in a perfect emotional pocket for this one. It worked and turned out great.

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Share your press release and reviews with us.

All the press releases and reviews have been so kind and complimentary, to be honest. One of my favorites was an album review and breakdown of the songs by No Depression. I have been a huge fan of that publication for a while and it was an honor to be mentioned by them. Huge Shoutout to Michael Stover for making this and that all possible as well. No one works harder than he does.

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Discuss your music career so far.

My music career has been a beautiful whirlwind I would say. There are always highs and lows in life in general and that will never stop. I’m lucky to have music to use as a way to cope with all of these situations. My full-time job for the past 10 years has been making music. I love what I do and I do what I love and I will continue to do so. My first couple of years in town were probably the craziest, to be honest. The first six months I was here I was at a house party and had just played a song called “Out Comes The Sun.” A bluegrass band called The Grascals were there and they loved it and said they wanted to cut it. I didn’t know what to say so I just laughed, but they were serious. They cut the song a few months later and brought me backstage to the Grand Ole Opry where I then got to play the song for the late great Little Jimmy Dickens in their dressing room. This formed a friendship and within the next few months I would record my first record and Little Jimmy would help me promote on RFD-TV and even appeared in my first music video for my song and title track for the record “Doggondest Feelin’.” I would later go onto to work with the Hank Williams Estate and Jett Williams as an opening act and part-time tour manager and manager of the estate. When that fizzled out I found myself lost and in a very transitional phase. A lot of things in my life were crumbling and falling apart. This is when I decided to change the only thing I had control over and took a new musical direction. The end result was “Things I Need To Say.” This has become my favorite thing I have ever made. It got me through a lot of really rough patches in my life. The connection and reception with this record have exceeded even my own expectations and I couldn’t be more grateful. I have been all over the US and parts of Europe and I look forward to going back and seeing more new places and playing more music.

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Tell us if you aspire to go into acting.

I have done a little bit of acting but I don’t consider myself great at it. I think I’m way better at being myself then I am playing some kind of other characters. I will do it if I have too though. I feel like I could probably do something fun if it had a comedy aspect to it. I love making people laugh.

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Tell us your gains and losses in the music business.

My gains in the industry have been having one of my songs in the running to be nominated for a Grammy off my first record and also having a song I wrote on a Grammy-nominated bluegrass album in the same year. I also consider it a substantial gain that I have been lucky enough and able to do this for a full-time job in a city full of struggling musicians for close to 10 years now. The losses in this business have been people I thought were friends coming and going out of life. You learn a lot of hard lessons about people and their intentions. In the end, I guess those are gains as well. Living and learning go hand in hand.

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List the media that have supported you so far with this song.

I’ve had a lot of support within Nashville which is always nice. Some good airplay overseas in Australia and various places. A lot of the local and indie syndicates have been very good to me as well. Every little bit helps and I thank everybody immensely.

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Tell us how you manage your time.

Most of my time is spent playing, making or thinking about music. I like to have one day a week where I relax but I usually end up just getting into something creative anyway. It all feeds my soul. I have two cats at my house and I like to spend time focusing on them or hanging out and catching up with my friends as well. Anything that feeds my soul and fills my cup is what I focus on. Life is too short.

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Tell us how you are able to actualize success in your music career.

I feel like success is always different for different people. Every day I wake and get to do what I love is a success. I’m in this for the long haul.

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Tell us if you an independent artist or you are a signed artist and tell us how you run your music career.

I am an Independent Artist and I run my music career through social media and other content based… The more you put yourself out there to people the more you are able to connect and grow your audience. I also play in downtown Nashville so I’m able to grow my fan base and connect with people from all over the world right out of the heart of the city.

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List the individuals responsible for writing, production, recording, directing, choreography, promotion and marketing of this project.

I did all the writing of the songs on the “Things I Need To Say” record. The production of the record was done by my phenomenal producer Michael Flanders. The direction and production of the videos were done by PJ Schenkel of and for Three Hat Media. The promotion and marketing of this product was set up and executed by the overly awesome Michael Stover. They are all top notch and I couldn’t and wouldn’t have done this without them.

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Tell us the instruments put together for the song.

The instruments we used were thought up pretty much as soon as we started playing the song in the studio. It kind of had this gypsy swing type ice to it so everyone all at once kind of her accordion factoring in. Once it was there it made too much sense and really brought the song together. We sent the track to percussive genius Steve Brewster here in Nashville and he worked up an amazing drum part which was cooler than any of us could’ve ever imagined. Dave Francis came in and put the tastiest of lead licks with acoustic guitar and bass on there as well. It happened so fast it just felt so meant to be.

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Tell us your experience recording in the studio and shooting the music video.

Both are such different beasts I would say. Recording in the studio is always a wonderful experience to me in the sense that you’re finally getting to breathe further life into something that has been just you and a guitar or piano for the longest time. It really levels a song up and sometimes you can find the song meaning something else or taking a whole new direction entirely. It’s such a blast. Shooting the music video was also fun but for different reasons. There’s a different kind of pressure and different kind of way you’re trying to make the same point as you did when you recorded the track. For me, I’m not as cosy acting as I am just singing so it takes working with someone like my great friend Pj Schenkel to take that edge and added pressure off to really capture a real more comfortable side. Both always end up being such a great time and we always emerge with a product everyone can be and are super proud of.

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Tell us the advice you will give to a new artist planning to shoot a music video.

I would say to not try too hard and make sure you as a person come through to the people who are going to see it. When those same people go to see you live you want them to be able to connect with the person they saw and became a fan of in the video. Consistency is key and knowing and being yourself is even more important both in life and career alike.

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Tell us the estimate of a commercial music video based on your experience.

As far as pricing goes? I feel like you shouldn’t spend over $10,000 unless you have money to just throw away or the person shooting it feels like charging you way more. But from what I’ve seen depending on the concept and where you’re doing it you can get away with something for that price or maybe even less.

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Tell us the reason you shot a video for this song.

We shot a video for this song because it was such a fan favorite for quite a few people even before it came out. I feel like it already meant a lot to a lot of people and I always want to have the most content I possibly can for a single release when it comes out. It was a way to maximize the impact of the song once it landed and it was also just super fun and we got excited about it. I’m very glad we shot it and I love the way it turned out.

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State your artist’s name and elaborate on it.

My artist name is Jeremy Parsons. Aside from my middle name, it is the name given to me at birth. My fathers’ name is Jerry so they wanted it to be similar without making me Jerry Jr. so I guess Jeremy was the best option.

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State the title of the song and the meaning.

The title of the song is “Why Is The Bluebird Blue.” The story is a rhetorical question one could ask one’s self when dealing with a certain amount of pain or conflict in general. In this case, the person in the song is trying to find common ground with a creature that is blue in comparison with his feelings of being blue. Sometimes it helps us to find or know that someone or something out there can empathize or sympathize with us.

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State the title of the album and the reason for choosing the title.

The title of the album is “Things I Need To Say.” And I chose the title because there are thirteen tracks of things I needed to say on the album. As we all know stuff happens in life that is unexpected and out of our control. It’s all a part of the ride. This album was written during one of those times in my life and probably the roughest patch I had and have been in to date. My parents had recently gotten divorced after 48 years of marriage, my manager had passed away, and I was lost and in search of direction. In this time I turned to my friends, what was left of my family, and my first love music. I was able to work through it day by day and also write my way out of the darkness and made some progress facing and coping with my emotions in the process. I will forever have a very intimate bond with this record for all these reasons. I would even go as far to say that… music saved me.


One comment:

  1. Pingback:Jeremy Parsons Interviewed On BroadTube TV! | Record Label, Artist Management, Music Publicity

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