Broadtube Music Mag Book - Volume 11

Music Mag Book 11

Broadtube Music Mag Book - Volume 11

Broadtube Music Mag Book – Volume 11

 

 

GRAB YOUR COPY NOW!

 

 

 

Broadtube Music Mag Book – Volume 11

 

Chapter 1 – Sancii + Drona

 

Chapter 2 – Living On Universal Denial

 

Chapter 3 – T8PES + Holly Fitzgerald

 

Chapter 4 – Ambition

 

Chapter 5 – Big City Cowgirl

 

Chapter 6 – Peyton Gilliland

 

Chapter 7 – KimieChen

 

Chapter 8 – Antonio Orrico

 

Chapter 9 – Aries Marquis

 

Chapter 10 – Los Vertigos

 

Chapter 11 – Music Licensing

Mobile Version

Lūkka - Feelings For You

Lūkka – Feelings For You

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lūkka - Feelings For You

Lūkka – Feelings For You

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lūkka – Feelings For You

 

ARTIST NAME: Lūkka

 

SONG TITLE: Feelings For You

 

ALBUM TITLE: California, Baby!

 

RELEASE DATE: March 29th 2019

 

GENRE: Pop

 

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Born as Lauren Clark, Lukka formed as she started writing melodies, hearing hi-hats, and humming her own made-up tunes.

 

By ten years of age, she had written enough material to make up two or three albums, and started writing the lyrics to her ‘yet to release’ debut LP at the age of 12.

 

Living in Los Angeles now, Lukka decided it was time to begin the production of the twelve-track pre-released record.

 

August 16th 2018, Lukka made her debut with the funky-fresh pop anthem, “Feelings for You.” Sky-rocketing herself into ‘Discover Weekly’ and ‘Release Radar’ the song managed to hit over 100,000 streams within the first month of its release.

 

Lukka continues her journey as she prepares her LP for its release.

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State your reason for choosing music as a career.

Music hasn’t even necessarily been a career for me up until I started putting out music.

 

I’d more so consider it an outlet, or a lifeline. I’ve always wanted to be someone who encouraged others to do what they felt they wanted to do, and if I become living proof of fighting to do what I love, and people can watch that – I think they’ll do it too.

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Tell us how you write the lyrics to your song.

Lyrics for me are where it all begins. If you can’t read a song through like a story after taking away all of the instrumentation and synth claps, then you’ve missed the whole point.

 

I write 100% of my lyrics by myself as of right now, typically in a dark room, on a classic electric piano or acoustic guitar.

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Share your press release and reviews with us.

Audibl Wav

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Discuss your life outside the music world.

I’m an average kid. I’m sixteen and literally can’t tell you a thing that I genuinely know for sure about the world.

 

I spend a ton of my time in my car driving around, trying my best to make it to class on time, literally running on five miles of gas, all while singing my heart out to any R&B music I can find on Apple Music’s, “Mood” Playlist.

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Discuss your music career.

When I was getting potty trained, my mom actually recalls finding me several times, singing made up lyrics on the toilet in the dark because that’s just how it worked out best for me.

 

Growing up, I could sense others’ emotions and the way that they felt about certain situations, and quite frankly, I started being able to interpret them for them.

 

It was odd, no one really knew why or how, and then soon enough, I started writing those interpretations down, and they turned into songs. I matured, but I kept the honesty. That is the only reason that any of my songs have turned out the way that they have. It’s crazy that people want to hear them, that’s the only career I’ll claim.

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Elaborate on your artist’s name.

This is super funny but my dad actually came up with it. He was in the Bahamas and we were trying to think about things that could work for a name. When all of a sudden, he just messed around with his words for a minute, and Lukka came out. It’s “bringer of light,” in Latin.

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List your five favourite music videos with reasons.

Violet – Daniel Caesar; hands down one of the most genuinely creative people ever.

 

Slow Dancing In The Dark – Joji; his actions display unbelievable and radical emotion of what heartbreak does to the soul.

 

See You Again – Tyler, the Creator featuring Kali Uchis; this dude knows how to connect confusing and tantalizing emotion and makes it all make sense and familiar.

 

Come Through and Chill – Miguel; this is one of my favorite videos because it takes you to a perspective from two individuals that you feel like you KNOW after you’ve watched the video.

 

Exchange – Bryson Tiller; Bryson puts me into some type of retro / indie video that makes me literally want to go make a music video as soon as I watch it.

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Tell us your source of inspiration.

My source of inspiration stems anywhere from heartbreak to relational fallouts that need a song written about them – For me, it’s all about the music; every single part.

 

It drives me crazy because knowing that there’s always something more to write about, makes me just want to write it.

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Tell us your experience on dealing with fans.

My fans are my friends. My fans are my people. The people that connect with me make me want to work until I’m blue in the face.

 

There are people out there who need to experience closeness with others and I genuinely want my music to be the Segway between people when it comes to listening and being heard. That’s all anybody wants at the end of the day.

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Elaborate on the recording of this song.

“Feelings for You” is literally the story of when I liked a guy who was so unbelievably off limits.

 

I recorded it along with the rest of the album in Laguna Hills after writing the album several months before.

 

It was like talking to a familiar friend that I actually didn’t know at all.

 

I had written the song but was in such a different place now than I was then, that it felt completely new.

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Tell us your future projects.

I started my debut album, “California, Baby!” in September 2017, and I am so proud to say that it’s finally coming out March 29th 2019!

 

It’s an 8 track project, including “Feelings for You.”

 

I am incredibly excited for you to hear it. I also have a song coming out almost EVERY month of this year.

 

That concept is called the Lukka Lounge, where I manufacture different tracks in my bedroom and then throw them into the studio where the real product comes into play.

 

I’ve also started my second album which is going to be strict R&B; I’m super excited about it.

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List the names of those that have supported you so far.

Nigel Martinez, Producer of my debut album

 

Toby Clark, Manager and Marketing Agent

 

Cole Boillat, Producer of Lukka Lounge / 2nd Album

 

Georganne Gould, Vocal Coach

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Tell us your point of view on vocal tuning.

I don’t think there’s anything wrong with intentional tuning if it’s intended to sound a certain way, there are plenty of songs that I believe should have vocal tuning because they are meant to sound cleaner than the voice can on its own.

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Tell us your thought on quality and quantity for the release of songs.

If you don’t think the song is good enough to be heard by the world, it’s not ready to be put out.

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Tell us your viewpoint on comparing music career to non-music career.

Everyone has the right to a life in and outside of their career. I think that musicians should be pushed and held to a standard of having a life outside of what they do for a living.

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Tell us your opinion on categorizing music into genres and sub-genres.

I think there are multiple ways to categorize different songs in the way that they are marketed. I think it’s fully possible for a song to be pop and R&B.

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State the genre you despise most with reason.

I can’t name a genre I necessarily despise but I’d say I definitely despise pointless music – Music that’s made purely for financial reasons or for fame.

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List your five favourite movies with reasons.

La La Land: This is my all-time favorite movie because it shows a modern musical as it should be made – The perfect mix of film and music.

 

Memento: This movie is honestly just mind-boggling, so interesting.

 

Ratatouille: This is my favorite kids’ movie because it never fails to keep my attention and it makes me smile.

 

Spider-Man: I honestly just love Spider-Man, and Toby McGuire.

 

The Notebook: Because who doesn’t love a sappy love story?

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State the title of the song and the meaning.

Feelings for You, this song displays a wide range of emotions in the realm of high school.

 

Liking a guy who’s completely out of reach – Pretty crazy to think about how that type of stuff changes.

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State the title of the album and the reason for choosing the title.

California Baby!

This title is actually written from one of the songs on the album – which is pretty funny. The song is all about being new to California, like I was just three years ago.

 

Mobile Version

Kaurna Cronin - Leave Your Love Behind

Kaurna Cronin

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kaurna Cronin - Leave Your Love Behind

Kaurna Cronin – Leave Your Love Behind

 

 

 

 

 

 

Artist Name – Kaurna Cronin

 

Song Title – Leave Your Love Behind

 

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Folkster Kaurna Cronin’s latest works intertwine meaningful songs with a rich musical tapestry of folk, roots and indie rock sewn together with grand imagery and tales of yesteryear.

 

From ballads to boogies Kaurna and his band’s unique folk blend has provided thrilling musical and poetical journeys for audiences globally.

 

Renowned for their relentless touring schedule, Kaurna together with his band provide their folk, Australiana inspired sounds which craftily compliment Cronin’s lyrically driven songwriting.

 

At just 26 years, Kaurna has released five albums with his latest being awarded ‘Roots Album Of The Year’ by ARBA.

 

After the award of Folk Alliance Australia’s ‘Artist Of The Year’ along with a plethora of other accolades including APRA AMCOS Emily Burrows Award and FLMA ‘Best Acoustic Artist’ Kaurna and band have mustered 300+ performances internationally in the past years throughout Australia, Italy, Germany, Sweden, Austria, Netherlands, Russia, Belgium, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland and India.

 

2019 will see the release of his newest works, a series of singles and a new album recorded partly in Germany, Australia and recorded with producers from David Bowie, Rolling Stones and Midnight Oil.

 

Mobile Version

Come at the King – Shudder

Come at the King – Shudder

 

 

 

 

 

 

Come at the King – Shudder

Come at the King – Shudder

 

 

 

 

 

Come at the King – Shudder

 

Artist Name – Come at the King

 

Song Title – Shudder

 

Genre – Rock

 

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Tell us how you structure and arrange your song.

We like a sinister build up – keep it slow and let people get comfortable, then make them jump with a big explosion of noise.

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Discuss how you fix the tempo for your song.

A lot of our tracks are pretty fast and rocking, but this one is groovy, so just felt a bit slower from the first time we played it and we liked it that way.

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Elaborate on multi-genre music.

All music tends to be multi-genred now – When I was young 50 Cent got bottled off stage at Reading Festival as no one liked to sway from their own genres so the rockers didn’t want to hear hip hop, but that’s different now and all festivals have a great mix of genres playing.

 

Genre diversity is celebrated now and artists are embracing that. We’ve got a bit of Oasis, Led Zep, The Strokes, Jamie T, Notorious BIG and S Club Juniors influence in our music.

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Tell us the best means of reaching fans.

Playing gigs – blowing their minds.

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Discuss the process involved in launching a musical career. 

Don’t think about it too much – just go and have a jam with your mates and you’ll come up with something cool.

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Tell us how to develop a lyric to a full song.

Comes pretty easy – usually about people or places I know, so write themselves.

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Tell us how you come up with a melody.

Jamming on the guitar for hours – I haven’t learned a new tab in years, always just pick the guitar up and have a play around the scales and something will jump out at me.

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Tell us your ideal type of recording studio. 

Good amps, good pedals, good producer, lager.

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Describe the factors you consider in a good song.

Lots of bluesy, groovy, heavy, dirty noise.

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Tell us how you relate with producers and music directors.

We work with a great producer who knows his stuff – although sometimes that means cutting my guitar solos in half, which I’m not happy about.

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Tell us how you feel after the completion of a song.

Drunk.

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Tell us your worst song and state the reason.

None – they’re all banging.

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Tell us what is special about this release.

It’s a fan favourite – sounds great when we play it live and have been told by multiple people to record this one next, so we’re just giving the people what they want.

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Tell us about your future goals.

Play gigs, write music, record, get drunk – see what happens.

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Elaborate on your artist name and the title of the album.

“Eh yo listen here Bay – you come at the king, you best not miss.”

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Share your press release.

The second single from London rock and roll trio, Come at the King with more of a bluesy feel than the garage indie rock tone of our debut single, Minesweep. A fan favourite at our live shows with blues rock groovy riffs moving ferociously into explosive, head banging choruses.

 

Mobile Version

Jane Silver - Wooden Fortress

Jane Silver – Wooden Fortress

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jane Silver - Wooden Fortress

Jane Silver – Wooden Fortress

 

 

 

 

 

ARTIST NAME: Jane Silver

 

SONG TITLE: The More You Say It The Less I Believe It

 

ALBUM TITLE: Wooden Fortress

 

RELEASE DATE: 29th March 2019

 

GENRE: Folk Rock

 

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Jane Silver is a singer-songwriter and guitarist originally from Barcelona and resident in London, where she is currently preparing her debut E.P. ‘Wooden Fortress’.

 

It will consist of a collection of stories made song, which she has already performed with her four piece band in both London and Barcelona.

 

Her updated version of folk music is influenced by artists like Joni Mitchell or David Crosby, and bands such as Pentangle and Led Zeppelin.

 

Jane Silver has already released two singles, ‘Marble’ and ‘Life Goes On’.

 

The last one being a collaboration with fellow folk artist and friend Gabriel Kazz.

 

Her upcoming E.P. will be out on March 29, 2019.

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Discuss your music career.

I can say that as long as I can keep writing songs and making music, I am a happy woman!

 

The simple concept of having a music career has become an unattainable DIY fantasy.

 

Musicians and artists who are now starting out are required to not only be musicians, but also be managers, booking agents, promoters, producers, sound engineers… which often leaves little time to what should be the core aspect of a music career: making music.

 

It is important to be proud of one’s work and share it with the world, yes, but not to the point of exhausting your days by doing self-promotion.

 

Focus on writing amazing tunes that make you happy!

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Brief us on how to impress fans during a live performance.

The best way to honour an audience who’s there to see you is by making sure to prepare an honest, beautiful performance.

 

Practice; don’t leave it for the last minute!

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List the names of your biggest supporters.

Friends, family and amazing talented artists around me.

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Explain what has motivated you so far in your music career.

The feeling of satisfaction and fulfilment when being able to express myself through the songs I write, and also the fact that hard work does pay off in a journey where you are constantly learning and evolving.

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Discuss your experience as an artist.

I come from an image-making background, having studied an arts degree before shifting to music. In a way this interest I have for imagery becomes an extension of the music I like to make, which to me is pretty colourful and narrative.

 

I often think more of myself as a writer rather than a performer, since I feel way more confident and experienced in that department.

 

However, being an artist often requires stepping out of one’s comfort zone, and that’s why I put effort to become a better performer.

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Tell us the biggest mistake you have ever made in your music career.

At times, when there are too many voices speaking at one, your own voice becomes dimmed. I normally find myself regretting a decision where I neglected what my gut was telling me to do.

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Discuss your opinion on the safety of fans during shows and live performances.

When people go to see live music, they want to have a good time, unwind. It is sad and concerning that some of the excitement of going to see live music can be taken away by the fact that there may be a threat of being harmed at the venue.

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Tell us the greatest piece of advice someone has given you as an artist.

Trust yourself, your instincts, but also be open to listening and learning from those who are more experienced or knowledgeable.

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Tell us what you will improve or change in your music.

As long as I keep making music and learning, there will be an organic improvement in the music, regardless of what I plan to improve on, I think!

 

However, the same way that I once consciously decided to improve my lyrical ideas, I am very excited about improving my production skills.

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Discuss vocal training and how you protect your vocal.

It was almost a year ago since I started actively working on how to make my vocals sound clearer when performing. Something as simple (and necessary!) as doing a vocal warm-up before singing can make such a huge difference in the way your voice sounds!

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Discuss your best mood during performance.

Relaxed, eager to have a good time and at peace with the fact that I may make mistakes!

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List your best artists with reasons.

Most of the artists that I love are those from which I see that I can learn in one way or another. I really admire good songwriting, so it’s needless to say that I love The Beatles. I’ve been very interested for a while in folk music from the 60s and 70s. I’ve been listening to a lot of Pentangle, Joni Mitchell and Crosby, Stills and Nash. I love the sound, the themes and the vocal melodies!

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Discuss your existence as an artist.

I try to keep a balanced and healthy lifestyle. I don’t really like the idea of the “tortured, miserable artist” that feeds his / her life into the work. It rarely ends up well! That’s why I really like telling stories in my songs, and creating characters and distant lands in order to express my ideas.

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Tell us the greatest problem you think is facing the society and the solution.

We are slowly and steadily losing touch with our own primordial nature. We are losing touch with nature and with each other, which in turn gets translated to an increasing apathy towards everything that surrounds us, be it the environment, be it the relationships we establish with one another.

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Discuss your songwriting and recording.

The process of writing and recording a song chances slightly depending on the song, I’d say. However, like in any creative process I think it is important to be assertive and capable of decision making.

 

The way you put together a song can go many ways, but it is important to keep in mind that if you don’t commit to some of your ideas, you may never finish such song!

 

My creative process tends to change slightly depending on what I am working on. Sometimes lyrics come first; sometimes a musical idea may be the beginning of a song.

 

Sometimes a song can be written in an afternoon, and sometimes it can take a week. It really depends.

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State your artist’s name and elaborate on it.

My artist’s name is Jane Silver. The name was inspired by one of the main characters from the book “Treasure Island”, John Silver. He is not the best of guys, but the first time I stumbled upon this character was on a prequel series about the book.

 

On the show, especially at the beginning, he is not so bad, and he gets out of most trouble because he’s really good as a storyteller.

 

My flat mates at the time seemed to see some parallelism between his skill and mine when it came to getting out of sticky situations!

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State the title of the song and the meaning.

“The More You Say It The Less I Believe It” (what a mouthful!) is a song about unfulfilled relationship expectations. There isn’t a big story behind it, more than just a bunch of observations put together about what it is to love someone and how such an immense feeling becomes a parody of itself through the different clichés depicted in popular culture.

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State the title of the album and the reason for choosing the title.

Wooden Fortress is also the name of the 5th song of the EP. It references to a symbolic place in which we all remain kids, like some kind of Peter Pan’s Neverland.

 

I have always found ridiculous how as we grow up we convince ourselves that we no longer know how to do certain things. A very clear example is how we all used to draw freely when we were kids, but once we grow up we automatically state that we cannot draw!

 

I guess that as we grow up we adapt to certain constructs of what “a real drawing” should look like, and hence we discard our own “not good enough drawings” and drop the pen and paper.

 

Wooden Fortress is a place where we don’t need to care about that, it is the place where we hold our inner child alive and free.

 

I decided to name the E.P. Wooden Fortress because it has been an exciting process of making mistakes and learning along the way.

 

The moment I decided I would produce it myself, I knew the result wouldn’t be perfect, but I also knew it would result in an accurate representation of where I was at the time.

 

Mobile Version

Monelise – Wild Roses

Monelise- Wild Roses

 

 

 

 

 

 

Monelise – Wild Roses

Monelise – Wild Roses

 

 

 

 

 

Artist Name – Monelise

 

Song Title – Wild Roses

 

Genres – Singer-Songwriter

 

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‘Wild Roses’ is the first release from Monelise’s ‘Hauntology’ Album.

 

Directed by Jake Hargreaves, the video is shot amongst the gothic scenery of Glen Coe, Scotland.

 

Drifting between analogue imagery and cinematic landscapes, the song is reminiscent of the work of The National and Portishead.

 

Having lived in Scotland for half a decade, Monelise quotes poet Robin Robertson with the video’s opening quote.

 

Monelise is an artist in whose haunting compositions moving poetic lyrics are situated in lush cinematic soundscapes.

 

Her music blurs the boundaries between acoustic and electronic instrumentation; hauntological longing and euphoria.

 

With songs that are often described as sounding like “A Kate Bush soundtrack to a David Lynch film”, she makes the sublime and the uncanny collide in a startling way.

 

I’m excited to release “Wild Roses” as the first single from my upcoming debut album, “Hauntology”, the material for which was conceived during my Master’s year at Goldsmiths.

 

The musical palette blends past and present inspirations, including Kate Bush and classic trip hop; whereas the lyrics are inspired by a Scottish poetry anthology exploring the visceral and gothic features of nature.

 

The song is an invitation to come face to face with the different components that make up the tapestry of you as a person and artist.

 

The video, accordingly, depicts me “finding myself” somewhere between the ghosts of the past and a glimmering vision of a future yet to unfold.

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Tell us how to refine a demo to a master.

This can vary from song to song. For instance, “Wild Roses” was demoed as a voice and piano version and evolved to its current, fully produced state in the studio, with the help of some reference tracks used for sonic inspiration.

 

Ultimately this song can still be performed in its original, piano and voice arrangement despite the dense sonic landscape in the recorded version.

 

In other cases, for instance with my upcoming single “Memory”, the production was an integral part of the writing process. So, I brought the song to the studio where it was mixed and mastered with most of the production already in place. When I perform this song live, I try to replicate the recording as closely as possible with the help of live electronics and evocative instruments like the Theremin.

 

In other words, how a song goes from a demo to a master, and how it ultimately exists in its live and recorded versions, depends on the context in which it was originally conceived.

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Discuss the processing involved in creating a song.

My songs have been born in a great multitude of contexts. I have randomly had a melody and lyric pop into my head and felt compelled to run to the piano and “work it out” as soon as possible before it leaves me.

 

I have begun songs in the studio using amalgamations of samples, building a sonic landscape and later finding lyrics to match.

 

Equally I have begun with lyrical stories— often inspired by books, poems and cinema— that were then put to music at a later stage.

 

Songs have also been born from co-writing sessions with other artists and songwriters.

 

Typically, in the songs I ultimately end up keeping (a small percentage of what is written), the elements come together very seamlessly and organically.

 

I prefer as little separation as possible between music, lyrics and production; they sort of exist together as a mind, body and soul.

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Elaborate on the theme of most of your songs.

The most common themes in my music include delving into the liminal “world between worlds”; sonic “time travel” (bridging the past and present through music); and nostalgia.

 

When writing music I try to access the subconscious and sonically expand on the themes that emerge from there.

 

Sometimes I will intuitively write lyrics that don’t make sense at the time, but later something will happen and suddenly the song makes complete sense. So they become almost prophetic.

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Tell us your greatest musical works up to date.

My favourite song I have written to date is called “We’ll Meet Again”. It is my favourite to perform live and will feature on my upcoming album.

 

It combines the atmosphere of a David Lynch film with the chord progressions of James Bond, and is lyrically about embracing unpredictability and infinite possibilities.

 

If we are talking about a full body of work, then I am probably most proud of the live show I created as my final Master’s project at Goldsmiths.

 

I am currently transforming this into a recorded album that I’d like to call “Hauntology” to honour my influences whilst at university. This is the album’s fundraiser page: Indiegogo.

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Tell us those behind your music process.

Last year I finished a Master’s degree in Popular Music at Goldsmiths and this was a year that really transformed both my music and my live show.

 

I very much value the opinion people I met there and am inspired by their work.

 

I sometimes write music solo and sometimes with co-writers and producers, who are another great inspiration.

 

My band mates are incredible and yet another creative force that inspires me to keep growing and evolving.

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Tell us how you are handling the promotion of your music.

I am currently on a European Sofar tour with my new songs, which has been incredible so far.

 

The audiences Sofar attracts are incredible and it’s an honour to be able to perform for them.

 

I am simultaneously creating video content for the album’s first two singles: “Wild Roses” and “Memory”.

 

Meanwhile my album’s fundraiser is running online and I hope to have it completed this summer.

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Tell us your future goals and how you aim to accomplish. 

Some of my future goals are to go on a tour to America (and hopefully the world one day!), write several film scores and put out at least one album every 2-3 years.

 

I plan to accomplish this by staying persistent and committed, constantly evolving my music and live show and putting out better and better content.

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Tell us what you think has changed in the music industry.

The music industry has transformed in so many ways. Although there are so many incredible artists out there, it is not all a big competition for the “spotlight.”

 

Everyone can find their own niche audience anywhere in the world using the infinite resources we now have at our fingertips.

 

I am greatly inspired and motivated by the fact it is now entirely possible to build your success independently and on your own in terms in today’s music landscape.

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Tell the greatest mistake to avoid while making a song.

I think this is individual for everyone, but for me it is over-thinking or trying too much to emulate another song or artist.

 

The best songs always come from telling your own story and creating your own sonic world. This is fully authentic, interesting and draws people in.

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Tell us how you boost your performance. 

I try to be neither too relaxed nor too nervous for a live show. A good amount of nerves is good; every gig matters (and should be treated as such), and you need a bit of adrenaline!

 

I always remind myself of the exhilarating and inimitable feeling of a great live performance and get myself pumped up that way.

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Discuss how the instruments come together for a song.

Structure, arrangement and instrumentation should all work together to serve the song and its main idea or purpose. This is why I don’t have similar structures in all my songs. Although, I do believe every song needs some sort of energetic progression.

 

To give an example, I have a song called “Memory” which is a sort of love song to another, much older song. Sonically it “time-travels” between the past and present, where the two voices (mine and the sampled one from the other track) overlap during different parts of the song.

 

The structure serves to enhance this sense of being immersed in almost a past life memory, whereas instrumentation and effects (Theremin, vinyl crackle, radio noise, old vintage piano) all “live and breathe” in this very particular sonic context.

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State your musical skills.

I have previously studied classical piano and musical theatre style signing.

 

Currently I play keys, Theremin, sing and operate live electronics. I also create the visual elements of my live set.

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Tell if you consider acting in a movie.

Definitely! I spent quite a few years acting before I got fully into music and am greatly inspired by cinema.

 

“Cinematic” is a world that really characterizes my sound. I would love to both score a film and someday act in one.

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Tell us how you eliminate noise in your recordings.

I often do the opposite, as noise / vinyl crackle are part of some of my songs’ aesthetic.

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List the name of artists you cherish most.

Kate Bush, Bjork, David Lynch / Angelo Badalamenti, Leonard Cohen, BANKS, Marina Abramovic, Frederic Chopin, Enrico Caruso, Yann Tiersen.

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Tell us how you get inspiration.

As a songwriter I am constantly drawing inspiration from everything around me unless it decides to “seize” me itself, which is very rare and special.

 

I am inspired, for instance, by poetry, literature, cinema, other artists’ songs and production choices, my own autobiographical experiences as well as other people’s stories.

 

I am also inspired by the unexplored, undiscovered world that exists beyond this one; something we can always choose to tap into.

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Elaborate on the song.

The lyrics for “Wild Roses” were inspired by a poetry anthology by Scottish poet Robin Robertson.

 

It is a beautiful book of poetry called “Sailing the Forest”, which presents nature in a very visceral, living way.

 

I lived in Scotland for 5 years, studying Literature and partaking in different art forms, and have always been inspired by its mystical, gothic landscapes. This also informed the choice of filming the “Wild Roses” video in Glen Coe.

 

The sonic world of the song, which was created with the help of a great producer called Tom Gibson, was inspired by both the old and the contemporary.

 

I drew on productions like “Teardrop”, “The Sensual World”, and “Expose” (Sunday Munich) and blended the trip hop vibes with ethereal melodies and haunting vocal layers.

 

With the lyrics and production combined, the song stands as an invitation to look beyond this world into something much darker and more mysterious— a place where past, present and future collide in a multi-dimensional, multi-sensory vision.

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Elaborate on the title of the album.

 The album name, “Hauntology”, was chosen to honour my time at Goldsmiths, where these songs were conceived – originally for a live show, hence the cinematic nature of the songs that will be on the record.

 

Hauntology, a concept I also discovered during research for my Master’s project, refers to a sense of being haunted by “lost futures” and consequently drawing on the “ghosts of the past” for inspiration.

 

Although my music is not by nature hauntological (like, for instance, the music of The Caretaker), many of my songs very much dance with the ghosts of the past whilst retaining a strong sense of their own identity.

 

Mobile Version

Jerome Lee – First Peace After the Rain

Jerome Lee

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jerome Lee – First Peace After the Rain

Jerome Lee – First Peace After the Rain

 

 

 

 

 

ARTIST NAME: Jerome Lee ​

 

SONG TITLE: First Peace After The Rain

 

SONG TITLE: The Suits

 

GENRE: Soul / Easy Listening / Jazz​

 

Apple Music

 

iTunes

 

Amazon

 

CD Baby

 

Reverbnation

 

Website

 

Tell us how you develop your sound and style to make it different from other musicians.

I would say that my sound was developed over the years through the lessons I took on both electric bass guitar and on the acoustic upright bass.

 

To play and to get good tone on the upright bass is demanding in its own way.

 

Electric bass guitars are different as the wood used during construction and the electronics used during construction did affect my playing sound and style.

 

Once I found the basses that gave me the opportunity to express myself freely on the instrument, developing my own style came naturally and as such, developed into my own signature style.

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Tell us your opinion on the way new artists are coming up and the frequent release of songs.

New artists are coming up in a media fueled world. They hear music differently and approach it differently in the cases where they did not grow up playing musical instruments.

 

The sound they’re creating is a departure from the past for sure. I have watched the world of online music sales change the way people enjoy their music.

 

Once upon a time the sale of full albums was the goal of many artists, but the à la carte way of music consumption today has changed that to a degree.

 

With that in mind, to release songs on a frequent basis has been a career strategy for many independent artists.

 

I would say that being aware of the marketplace new artists are releasing their music to should be carefully considered and measured as to not over saturate their listeners with too many singles within a short period of time.

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Tell us your experience as a musician.

It has been the greatest exchange between myself and the men, women and children on the different islands and continents around the world that have introduced me to musical, emotional, and performance experiences that are hard to describe. It has been an astounding experience for me.

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Tell us your opinion on streaming and digital download of songs.

Since the advent of the Internet, the introduction of the ability to give music listeners a wide-ranging choice of how to receive their music has become absolutely gigantic.

 

When true 5G wireless technology and beyond becomes commonplace it will be hard to imagine the new platforms that will emerge for online music interactions and sales.

 

And while I think that legal streaming and downloading of music is a good thing, I am glad to see that some more serious attention is being paid to the content creators for their works being made available through streaming and the increased attention to the financial compensation for their works on that platform.

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Tell us your goals and plans.

Ah yes, goals and plans. It is good to have them. I plan on continuing to make good music for as long as I can. If I can retire and still play music 10 years from now then that is a blessing indeed.

 

But I do have a quiet goal of somehow being able to help other independent artists in the music industry move forward with their works. I’ll see how that goes as we move forward.

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Tell us five current artists that are your favourite.

I like Esperanza Spalding, Tom Chappell, Rebecca Harrold, Johnny Hyatt, and The Outcome.

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Tell us your best song up to date.

My single song titled “The Suits.”

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Tell us your dream and hope for the future.

A world of less strife and more love and sharing between the people who live on the planet – When there is less strife, the positive exchange of goods, services and the arts between people is increased to the benefit of everyone.

 

A world that wants to educate its people as they grow – And I hope for good health for myself and for us all.

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Tell us what has changed in the music industry.

Without a doubt, the advent of the Internet has changed the music industry to such a degree that I think at some point in the future we will not see business conducted in the same manner as it was before ever again.

 

And the clever and creative use of media playback devices now being used on stage by many artists is also a game changer in the industry.

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Tell us your opinion on television / radio stations playing the same songs from established artists and giving little chances to independent artists.

While that has been something of a standard industry practice for decades now, there could be some light at the end of the tunnel for independent artists.

 

 

I think it may have already begun with the FCC allocation of some FM radio frequencies that were temporarily auctioned off at much lower costs a couple of years ago to those who were seeking to keep radio what it originally was meant to be; a local or community outreach to people living nearby.

 

With this FCC allocation, it allows smaller local community radio stations to flourish and choose their own playlists which often include their own local music artists. It is a slow process, but I like where it is going.

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Tell us the challenges independent artists are facing and how to tackle it.

Independent artists are facing an ever-changing music world. It has caused many artists to think along the lines of being an online startup business really. Because that is what the online music industry has done; on the one hand there is a lot of opportunity to get financial traction on the web, and on the other hand there is a vast and seemingly overwhelming amount of competition to contend with for each artist.

 

From what I have experienced, it seems to be better to have a live music working situation in place to couple with an online music artist presence. Playing live as an independent artist seems to work well with a carefully crafted online presence and that seems to be one good way of tackling some of the obstacles in the industry.

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Share your press release and reviews with us.

National Endowment for the Arts – Jerome Lee

 

Bass Musician Magazine Interview Online with Jerome Lee

 

WSPR Simple Pleasures Radio Artist Spotlight On Air Interview – Jerome Lee

 

Indie Music Interviews – Jerome Lee

 

Indie Spoonful Reviews “The Suits” – Jerome Lee

 

NeuFutur Magazine Review “The Suits” – Jerome Lee

 

The Music Butcher Music Blog Review “The Suits” – Jerome Lee

 

Sister Dorothy’s Music Blog Review “The Suits” – Jerome Lee

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Tell us your opinion on using social media to promote music online.

Social media has a good place for artists promoting their music online.

 

But I think social media sites should be used wisely, and I think that artists should be careful not to rely on social media websites to be their sole place of web exposure.

 

Social media websites can change without notice to the user, and your data can be in jeopardy if you do not monitor the site.

 

Instead, an official website with an assigned web address for the artist is still the best online foundation for any independent artist.

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Tell us about your music career.

My music career has been one of the most traveled experiences that I could have imagined.

 

Being able to play, read, and write music has allowed me to venture out into the world and create and share music with other artists with confidence; any language barrier was always overcome instead by communicating with each other by playing music together.

 

I have been fortunate to have played and recorded so many different styles of music with a lot of people, and I am glad that much of the recorded music made is still available for people to discover and enjoy.

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Tell us what still motivates you to go on with your music career.

I still love to play the bass. It is a joy to simply continue to do just that.

 

But career wise I still hear the words of my wonderful songwriter / teacher Pete Luboff ring in my ears; “All it takes is one good song to change your entire life”. I would say that statement has continued to motivate me to keep going forward.

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Tell us about you as a person.

I love music, and I love to create new music. I like a lot of major music artists, and I like a lot of lesser known independent artists as well.

 

I like history, and I like to know where things come from a lot of times.

 

I also read all of the manuals to all of my gear and software, guess I’m just that way.

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Elaborate on the story behind the song.

This song and its spirit came through me as a realization of a life experience that so many of us as people have shared. When we are encountering rain that falls straight down with real intensity in our lives, especially when we are outdoors, those moments in the rain bring about many thoughts in the mind that can be challenging to us.

 

But when the rain stops suddenly, there is a peace in those moments that is singular each time we encounter them. There is a quiet stillness, and when one is outside not even the birds or other animals are heard for several moments.

 

It is during these moments of quiet and serenity after an intense rain where the origin of this song arose within me and allowed me to respond to its peace and beauty.

 

It mirrors what happens in our own lives as we encounter our own intensely raining moments.

 

 

But when the rain stops, as it always does, we have a sense of peace within us once again.

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Tell us the process involved in making this song.

The process in making “First Peace After The Rain” was a fun one for me.

 

The bass line came along first, and I got an opportunity to play an electric upright bass with percussionist / drummer and friend Daniel Kloza and experiment and have a bit of fun at a local rehearsal room.

 

I played the bass line and told Daniel which direction my arrangement was going and he learned it and played the whole song in a short time.

 

I took the rehearsal recording home of the two of us playing the song and my ideas grew from there.

 

I took a while to record and arrange the music. But the lyrics came to me quickly and I had to write them down on the spot. I am glad that I did because they are now on the recording that you hear today. It’s not often that song lyrics flow through me and I don’t make any revisions or changes to them. But it happened this time, and I feel glad that I felt in touch with the spiritual side of myself when it happened.

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Tell us about your future music projects.

Here in early 2019 I am currently working and playing bass on a new music project this time led by the great guitarist Johnny Hyatt; his music is high energy rock and roll, and hard rock.

 

I am also in the beginning recording stages for my next single release.

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Tell us if you will change the style of your music to get signed.

Change my style of music to get signed to a record deal?

 

I probably already have during my career with the many music bands that I’ve had the opportunity to work with.

 

The music they played was not necessarily my own personal style of music per se, but I was and still am willing to make sure that whichever band’s music I work with or record with has all that it needs style wise for it to hopefully be a successful offering.

 

And in my own career, at this point it would be better for me to play the style of music that is in my heart these days, it feels better for me to do so.

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Elaborate on this song.

My song “The Suits” is a commentary on both my own life experiences and the experiences of others who have encountered those in societies who are in control politically and financially and wear the suit garment.

 

The person in the song wonders what their life might be if they too were to wear a suit garment, and in the song’s outro you can hear that person thinking about the new and possibly better life situations that could be had from wearing a suit that are never really answered by the song’s end.

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Tell us if you have a guideline or standard set for your music production.

I do have a high standard for my music production, and I am strict with myself when it comes to recording and publishing my own music for others to experience.

 

I also work on recordings made by several independent artists over the Internet, and that can vary from me either creating or recording bass lines for their material, or sometimes it can be a request for either a mix-down or a mastering session for their music.

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Tell us your preparation for a live performance and how you make sure the quality of sound is high.

When preparing for a live performance in public, rehearsals are key in finding sweet spots in the music for my bass sound.

 

I record most or all of any band rehearsals that I’m involved in on a portable digital audio recorder. Then at home and after listening to the rehearsal recordings I’ve made, if I need to make changes to my live bass sound I will carefully construct or modify the sounds that I have in my bass effects unit before the next band rehearsal. At that point, I am dialed in much better and I am then prepared to move forward to the live band performance.

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Discuss how to live healthy.

Eat food that is good for you as often as possible, especially as one grows older. Several years ago, I was able to lose a good deal of weight by changing my diet and staying with an exercise regimen. And to this day, I have been able to keep the weight off of me.

 

Be careful of what you say out loud about yourself, and always show yourself respect and love so you can respect and love others.

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Tell us if you are in control of your performance or you are still learning.

I am quietly celebrating my 50th year of bass playing, so I can say that I am in control of my performance at this point.

 

I am also glad that I was able to gain control of my performance as a performer and musician at an early age, so I feel very fortunate.

 

But truth be told I am always learning from the music itself as well as from other musicians because of the challenge presented to me to continue producing something new from myself and for other artists.

 

The learning potential from music seems to have no real boundaries, allowing artists to embark upon the artistic directions they wish to explore.

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Tell us that precious moment you chose music as a career.

In high school sports as a senior I suffered a broken bone injury to my hand.

 

 My high school orchestra’s conductor was not very happy with me upon discovering this and told me in no uncertain terms that I had to make a serious choice right then between sports and music.

 

And I decided that it was going to be a career in music that I’d follow. When my career in military service ended, and as soon as I was a civilian again, I embarked on a career in music that so far has not wavered much. I have always kept professional music in my life to the best of my ability throughout the years.

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Tell us the greatest feedback you have ever received on a song of yours.

I would have to say it is the recognition I received from the National Endowment for the Arts. I submitted my song titled “Time Gone Away” to them back in 2015 during their 50th anniversary celebration. They accepted my song along with the text and graphics that I sent to them and they created a profile page of me at their website that has now been archived. That to me is very honorable feedback of my song without directly reviewing it publicly.

 

And I also must include Bryon William Harris of BWH Music Group for his excellent review of my single song titled “The Suits”. Bryon really got to the song’s undertone and meaning in his review, and he has truly understood the song’s character and meaning coming from me. It is a great review.

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Tell us your side interest apart from music.

I love to travel, and I think that the many lands of the world are very beautiful places to visit and experience.

 

And I do like great food from the many nations that I have been fortunate enough to visit, and I would say that those culinary experiences are unforgettable.

 

I also like good films and documentaries.

 

And even in this digital age, I still like a good paper book to read.

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Tell us the artist that influenced you.

It’s hard to say that it was just one artist who influenced me. I actually have an Influences Page at my website that addresses this. But to answer the question, I’d say it’s equal parts of influence between my music teachers Mr. Hart, Mr. Tomforde and Mr. Earlanson during my early years on electric and upright acoustic bass; some of my friends named John, Jerome, Buster, and Gary who played the bass in my neighborhoods while I was growing up; and some of the established electric bass players like Monk Montgomery, Jerry Jemmott, Robert “Kool” Bell, Chuck Rainey, Ronnie Baker, Carol Kaye, Stanley Clarke and Alphonso Johnson.

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Tell us if you prefer singing as a solo artist to collaborating with others.

Over the years as I recorded with the music groups that I was in, singing felt like a natural thing for me to do. I found parts in the range of my vocal register with these groups that blended well with their music.

 

It is fun to collaborate with other artists as a vocalist, a nice exchange of ideas seem to flow.

 

But as a solo artist, there are some differences in the recording approach as on one hand I have free reign on what I would like to sing.

 

But on the other hand, with no other person there to bounce ideas off of, I have often allowed the songs themselves to dictate some of the vocal lines and melodies that I produce.

 

Most times though, I don’t feel a particular preference as long as I can sing my parts to the music and hopefully produce a good outcome.

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Tell us the full details of this song.

I began with the lyrics on “The Suits” a long time ago. And I felt some music emerge from me to match the attitude of the song’s essence.

 

It was going to be a much angrier song at first, but the lyrics led me to the overall tone of the song that you hear today.

 

I recorded it in Steinberg Nuendo, which is a powerful audio workstation program. One thing that I am quietly happy with is the fact that I took the time on this song to attend to the drums very closely, and by using the MIDI step writing feature I was actually able to create more human sounding drum rhythm patterns that had no repeat fills anywhere in the song. It takes a long time to do this, but I got better and faster as the MIDI step writing process went forward.

 

I have done my own mastering for a long time now, and I used the IK Multimedia T-Racks24 mastering suite.

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Tell us the organization you will set up to fight a cause and state your reason for fighting the cause.

If I could one day, I would try to set up something to truly assist those who have no home, and fight to survive out in the elements.

 

I worked for a food bank for a couple of years back in the 1980’s so I have seen the dilemma of people surviving in this manner up close.

 

And if I could start another organization, it would be one of a world musician exchange where musicians could live in another country for a year and share their creativity with the musicians residing there. I think that there would be even more new avenues of styles and creations of music if this kind of an international exchange could take place.

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Tell us your mood while performing.

Mostly it is joy that I feel when I perform, and that joy has grown as I have become older. Each opportunity to perform music is very special indeed, so each time I am granted such an opportunity there is joy for me whether I am performing as a solo artist or performing with a music group.

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Tell us the mistakes to avoid in the music business.

Be early to everything. Practice at home and practice as often as one can to be proficient on a musical instrument(s).

 

Do read everything you can about the industry, and here, knowledge really is power.

 

And as independent musicians have been forced really to become their own startups in this digital and Internet era, careful and respectful placement of what is revealed and shared online as a solo artist or a music group is of a high priority to gain any longevity or mindshare with people.

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Tell us your opinion on smoking, health is wealth but people still smoke.

Yes people do smoke, and it is worldwide. People do have a right and an opportunity to choose whether they smoke or not, and smoking has gone on for many thousands of years now.

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State your artist’s name and elaborate on it.

Jerome Lee. It’s pretty simple really. In my family, many years ago my younger brother began to work in terrestrial radio and he had his own show. He used his first and middle names to identify himself with his radio audience.

 

I liked what he had done, so I asked my mother if it was alright for me to do the same thing with my own first and middle names to use for my blossoming music career. She said yes, and I have gone on with that name ever since, up until this day.

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State the title of the song and the meaning.

“The Suits” is a reference and an observation from one person’s point of view from their interactions with those wearing a suit garment, and how they feel that their life might be possibly improved by wearing a suit themselves.

 

The title “First Peace After The Rain” describes the feelings so many of us have during a heavy rain in our lives, and how there is peace for us when the heavy rain stops falling.

 

Mobile Version

Kfir - Outta Love

Kfir – Outta Love

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kfir - Outta Love

Kfir – Outta Love

 

 

 

 

 

 

Artist Name – Kfir

 

Song Title – Outta Love

 

Genre – Pop

 

Website

 

Instagram

 

Twitter

 

Apple Music

 

iTunes

 

Spotify

 

Kfir has released a second single entitled “Outta Love” from the artist’s fierce new E.P. “Free Delivery.”

 

It could be said that Kfir’s entire life has led up to this moment. From being raised by his mother who was a professional singer to performing in Phantom of the Opera on Broadway, Kfir has always been surrounded by music and art.

 

 

His release, “Outta Love” puts a seductive, melodious spin on his meaningful lyrics.

 

“Outta Love” released on Valentine’s Day, following the soaring success of his first single “Drama Queen”.

 

With his “James Bond Pop” vibe and honest lyrics, “Outta Love” conveys the mature, soulful delivery that will drive Kfir towards a successful career, while taking the risks necessary to create true art.

 

The highly anticipated EP “Free Delivery” was released shortly after the single, with plenty of visual and audio content tailor made for music lovers.

 

“Free Delivery” was created with friend and producer Pablo San Martin and co-written with Javier Cardellino.

 

He collaborated closely to create a provocative, full-bodied sound that puts forth a message of freedom, bravery, and pure entertainment.

 

Kfir on his work:

“I feel like this is my most mature and fun writing to date – A total departure from my past sound since I started writing music.

 

I called the EP “Free Delivery” for two reasons: While I wasn’t sure what I was going to name it; I was hunted on the subway by a red free delivery sign.

 

When I finally thought about it, I realized that my writings on the E.P. are totally honest with the subject matter, and for me it was a free delivery of the truth.

 

With no filters or trying to edit myself in order to fit in, I created the music for me first!

 

I just wrote honest lyrics and themes in hopes that the material will touch someone the way it touched me!”

 

Free Delivery E.P. was written by Kfir M. Danieli, Javier Cardellino, and Benjamin Samama and was produced and mixed by Pablo San Martin. The E.P. was recorded at Esoteric Studios in Brooklyn, New York.

 

About Kfir

Kfir is a music performance artist currently based in New York, New York.

 

His musically diverse upbringing instilled a love of music and performance that grew with him.

 

Kfir has spent his life pursuing his passions, which took him from his classical ballet training, to Broadway, to now releasing his first EP.

 

Kfir developed himself as an artist writing poetry, eventually expanding upon that and adding music to his words.

 

After his dance mix single “Heart After Dark” went to number six on the UK pop charts, he was able to raise the money he needed to fund his newest endeavor, “Free Delivery”.

 

Mobile Version