Monelise – Wild Roses

Monelise- Wild Roses

 

 

 

 

 

 

Monelise – Wild Roses

Monelise – Wild Roses

 

 

 

 

 

Artist Name – Monelise

 

Song Title – Wild Roses

 

Genres – Singer-Songwriter

 

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‘Wild Roses’ is the first release from Monelise’s ‘Hauntology’ Album.

 

Directed by Jake Hargreaves, the video is shot amongst the gothic scenery of Glen Coe, Scotland.

 

Drifting between analogue imagery and cinematic landscapes, the song is reminiscent of the work of The National and Portishead.

 

Having lived in Scotland for half a decade, Monelise quotes poet Robin Robertson with the video’s opening quote.

 

Monelise is an artist in whose haunting compositions moving poetic lyrics are situated in lush cinematic soundscapes.

 

Her music blurs the boundaries between acoustic and electronic instrumentation; hauntological longing and euphoria.

 

With songs that are often described as sounding like “A Kate Bush soundtrack to a David Lynch film”, she makes the sublime and the uncanny collide in a startling way.

 

I’m excited to release “Wild Roses” as the first single from my upcoming debut album, “Hauntology”, the material for which was conceived during my Master’s year at Goldsmiths.

 

The musical palette blends past and present inspirations, including Kate Bush and classic trip hop; whereas the lyrics are inspired by a Scottish poetry anthology exploring the visceral and gothic features of nature.

 

The song is an invitation to come face to face with the different components that make up the tapestry of you as a person and artist.

 

The video, accordingly, depicts me “finding myself” somewhere between the ghosts of the past and a glimmering vision of a future yet to unfold.

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Tell us how to refine a demo to a master.

This can vary from song to song. For instance, “Wild Roses” was demoed as a voice and piano version and evolved to its current, fully produced state in the studio, with the help of some reference tracks used for sonic inspiration.

 

Ultimately this song can still be performed in its original, piano and voice arrangement despite the dense sonic landscape in the recorded version.

 

In other cases, for instance with my upcoming single “Memory”, the production was an integral part of the writing process. So, I brought the song to the studio where it was mixed and mastered with most of the production already in place. When I perform this song live, I try to replicate the recording as closely as possible with the help of live electronics and evocative instruments like the Theremin.

 

In other words, how a song goes from a demo to a master, and how it ultimately exists in its live and recorded versions, depends on the context in which it was originally conceived.

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Discuss the processing involved in creating a song.

My songs have been born in a great multitude of contexts. I have randomly had a melody and lyric pop into my head and felt compelled to run to the piano and “work it out” as soon as possible before it leaves me.

 

I have begun songs in the studio using amalgamations of samples, building a sonic landscape and later finding lyrics to match.

 

Equally I have begun with lyrical stories— often inspired by books, poems and cinema— that were then put to music at a later stage.

 

Songs have also been born from co-writing sessions with other artists and songwriters.

 

Typically, in the songs I ultimately end up keeping (a small percentage of what is written), the elements come together very seamlessly and organically.

 

I prefer as little separation as possible between music, lyrics and production; they sort of exist together as a mind, body and soul.

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Elaborate on the theme of most of your songs.

The most common themes in my music include delving into the liminal “world between worlds”; sonic “time travel” (bridging the past and present through music); and nostalgia.

 

When writing music I try to access the subconscious and sonically expand on the themes that emerge from there.

 

Sometimes I will intuitively write lyrics that don’t make sense at the time, but later something will happen and suddenly the song makes complete sense. So they become almost prophetic.

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Tell us your greatest musical works up to date.

My favourite song I have written to date is called “We’ll Meet Again”. It is my favourite to perform live and will feature on my upcoming album.

 

It combines the atmosphere of a David Lynch film with the chord progressions of James Bond, and is lyrically about embracing unpredictability and infinite possibilities.

 

If we are talking about a full body of work, then I am probably most proud of the live show I created as my final Master’s project at Goldsmiths.

 

I am currently transforming this into a recorded album that I’d like to call “Hauntology” to honour my influences whilst at university. This is the album’s fundraiser page: Indiegogo.

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Tell us those behind your music process.

Last year I finished a Master’s degree in Popular Music at Goldsmiths and this was a year that really transformed both my music and my live show.

 

I very much value the opinion people I met there and am inspired by their work.

 

I sometimes write music solo and sometimes with co-writers and producers, who are another great inspiration.

 

My band mates are incredible and yet another creative force that inspires me to keep growing and evolving.

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Tell us how you are handling the promotion of your music.

I am currently on a European Sofar tour with my new songs, which has been incredible so far.

 

The audiences Sofar attracts are incredible and it’s an honour to be able to perform for them.

 

I am simultaneously creating video content for the album’s first two singles: “Wild Roses” and “Memory”.

 

Meanwhile my album’s fundraiser is running online and I hope to have it completed this summer.

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Tell us your future goals and how you aim to accomplish. 

Some of my future goals are to go on a tour to America (and hopefully the world one day!), write several film scores and put out at least one album every 2-3 years.

 

I plan to accomplish this by staying persistent and committed, constantly evolving my music and live show and putting out better and better content.

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Tell us what you think has changed in the music industry.

The music industry has transformed in so many ways. Although there are so many incredible artists out there, it is not all a big competition for the “spotlight.”

 

Everyone can find their own niche audience anywhere in the world using the infinite resources we now have at our fingertips.

 

I am greatly inspired and motivated by the fact it is now entirely possible to build your success independently and on your own in terms in today’s music landscape.

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Tell the greatest mistake to avoid while making a song.

I think this is individual for everyone, but for me it is over-thinking or trying too much to emulate another song or artist.

 

The best songs always come from telling your own story and creating your own sonic world. This is fully authentic, interesting and draws people in.

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Tell us how you boost your performance. 

I try to be neither too relaxed nor too nervous for a live show. A good amount of nerves is good; every gig matters (and should be treated as such), and you need a bit of adrenaline!

 

I always remind myself of the exhilarating and inimitable feeling of a great live performance and get myself pumped up that way.

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Discuss how the instruments come together for a song.

Structure, arrangement and instrumentation should all work together to serve the song and its main idea or purpose. This is why I don’t have similar structures in all my songs. Although, I do believe every song needs some sort of energetic progression.

 

To give an example, I have a song called “Memory” which is a sort of love song to another, much older song. Sonically it “time-travels” between the past and present, where the two voices (mine and the sampled one from the other track) overlap during different parts of the song.

 

The structure serves to enhance this sense of being immersed in almost a past life memory, whereas instrumentation and effects (Theremin, vinyl crackle, radio noise, old vintage piano) all “live and breathe” in this very particular sonic context.

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State your musical skills.

I have previously studied classical piano and musical theatre style signing.

 

Currently I play keys, Theremin, sing and operate live electronics. I also create the visual elements of my live set.

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Tell if you consider acting in a movie.

Definitely! I spent quite a few years acting before I got fully into music and am greatly inspired by cinema.

 

“Cinematic” is a world that really characterizes my sound. I would love to both score a film and someday act in one.

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Tell us how you eliminate noise in your recordings.

I often do the opposite, as noise / vinyl crackle are part of some of my songs’ aesthetic.

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List the name of artists you cherish most.

Kate Bush, Bjork, David Lynch / Angelo Badalamenti, Leonard Cohen, BANKS, Marina Abramovic, Frederic Chopin, Enrico Caruso, Yann Tiersen.

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Tell us how you get inspiration.

As a songwriter I am constantly drawing inspiration from everything around me unless it decides to “seize” me itself, which is very rare and special.

 

I am inspired, for instance, by poetry, literature, cinema, other artists’ songs and production choices, my own autobiographical experiences as well as other people’s stories.

 

I am also inspired by the unexplored, undiscovered world that exists beyond this one; something we can always choose to tap into.

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Elaborate on the song.

The lyrics for “Wild Roses” were inspired by a poetry anthology by Scottish poet Robin Robertson.

 

It is a beautiful book of poetry called “Sailing the Forest”, which presents nature in a very visceral, living way.

 

I lived in Scotland for 5 years, studying Literature and partaking in different art forms, and have always been inspired by its mystical, gothic landscapes. This also informed the choice of filming the “Wild Roses” video in Glen Coe.

 

The sonic world of the song, which was created with the help of a great producer called Tom Gibson, was inspired by both the old and the contemporary.

 

I drew on productions like “Teardrop”, “The Sensual World”, and “Expose” (Sunday Munich) and blended the trip hop vibes with ethereal melodies and haunting vocal layers.

 

With the lyrics and production combined, the song stands as an invitation to look beyond this world into something much darker and more mysterious— a place where past, present and future collide in a multi-dimensional, multi-sensory vision.

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Elaborate on the title of the album.

 The album name, “Hauntology”, was chosen to honour my time at Goldsmiths, where these songs were conceived – originally for a live show, hence the cinematic nature of the songs that will be on the record.

 

Hauntology, a concept I also discovered during research for my Master’s project, refers to a sense of being haunted by “lost futures” and consequently drawing on the “ghosts of the past” for inspiration.

 

Although my music is not by nature hauntological (like, for instance, the music of The Caretaker), many of my songs very much dance with the ghosts of the past whilst retaining a strong sense of their own identity.

 

Mobile Version

Jerome Lee – First Peace After the Rain

Jerome Lee

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jerome Lee – First Peace After the Rain

Jerome Lee – First Peace After the Rain

 

 

 

 

 

ARTIST NAME: Jerome Lee ​

 

SONG TITLE: First Peace After The Rain

 

SONG TITLE: The Suits

 

GENRE: Soul / Easy Listening / Jazz​

 

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Tell us how you develop your sound and style to make it different from other musicians.

I would say that my sound was developed over the years through the lessons I took on both electric bass guitar and on the acoustic upright bass.

 

To play and to get good tone on the upright bass is demanding in its own way.

 

Electric bass guitars are different as the wood used during construction and the electronics used during construction did affect my playing sound and style.

 

Once I found the basses that gave me the opportunity to express myself freely on the instrument, developing my own style came naturally and as such, developed into my own signature style.

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Tell us your opinion on the way new artists are coming up and the frequent release of songs.

New artists are coming up in a media fueled world. They hear music differently and approach it differently in the cases where they did not grow up playing musical instruments.

 

The sound they’re creating is a departure from the past for sure. I have watched the world of online music sales change the way people enjoy their music.

 

Once upon a time the sale of full albums was the goal of many artists, but the à la carte way of music consumption today has changed that to a degree.

 

With that in mind, to release songs on a frequent basis has been a career strategy for many independent artists.

 

I would say that being aware of the marketplace new artists are releasing their music to should be carefully considered and measured as to not over saturate their listeners with too many singles within a short period of time.

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Tell us your experience as a musician.

It has been the greatest exchange between myself and the men, women and children on the different islands and continents around the world that have introduced me to musical, emotional, and performance experiences that are hard to describe. It has been an astounding experience for me.

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Tell us your opinion on streaming and digital download of songs.

Since the advent of the Internet, the introduction of the ability to give music listeners a wide-ranging choice of how to receive their music has become absolutely gigantic.

 

When true 5G wireless technology and beyond becomes commonplace it will be hard to imagine the new platforms that will emerge for online music interactions and sales.

 

And while I think that legal streaming and downloading of music is a good thing, I am glad to see that some more serious attention is being paid to the content creators for their works being made available through streaming and the increased attention to the financial compensation for their works on that platform.

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Tell us your goals and plans.

Ah yes, goals and plans. It is good to have them. I plan on continuing to make good music for as long as I can. If I can retire and still play music 10 years from now then that is a blessing indeed.

 

But I do have a quiet goal of somehow being able to help other independent artists in the music industry move forward with their works. I’ll see how that goes as we move forward.

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Tell us five current artists that are your favourite.

I like Esperanza Spalding, Tom Chappell, Rebecca Harrold, Johnny Hyatt, and The Outcome.

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Tell us your best song up to date.

My single song titled “The Suits.”

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Tell us your dream and hope for the future.

A world of less strife and more love and sharing between the people who live on the planet – When there is less strife, the positive exchange of goods, services and the arts between people is increased to the benefit of everyone.

 

A world that wants to educate its people as they grow – And I hope for good health for myself and for us all.

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Tell us what has changed in the music industry.

Without a doubt, the advent of the Internet has changed the music industry to such a degree that I think at some point in the future we will not see business conducted in the same manner as it was before ever again.

 

And the clever and creative use of media playback devices now being used on stage by many artists is also a game changer in the industry.

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Tell us your opinion on television / radio stations playing the same songs from established artists and giving little chances to independent artists.

While that has been something of a standard industry practice for decades now, there could be some light at the end of the tunnel for independent artists.

 

 

I think it may have already begun with the FCC allocation of some FM radio frequencies that were temporarily auctioned off at much lower costs a couple of years ago to those who were seeking to keep radio what it originally was meant to be; a local or community outreach to people living nearby.

 

With this FCC allocation, it allows smaller local community radio stations to flourish and choose their own playlists which often include their own local music artists. It is a slow process, but I like where it is going.

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Tell us the challenges independent artists are facing and how to tackle it.

Independent artists are facing an ever-changing music world. It has caused many artists to think along the lines of being an online startup business really. Because that is what the online music industry has done; on the one hand there is a lot of opportunity to get financial traction on the web, and on the other hand there is a vast and seemingly overwhelming amount of competition to contend with for each artist.

 

From what I have experienced, it seems to be better to have a live music working situation in place to couple with an online music artist presence. Playing live as an independent artist seems to work well with a carefully crafted online presence and that seems to be one good way of tackling some of the obstacles in the industry.

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Share your press release and reviews with us.

National Endowment for the Arts – Jerome Lee

 

Bass Musician Magazine Interview Online with Jerome Lee

 

WSPR Simple Pleasures Radio Artist Spotlight On Air Interview – Jerome Lee

 

Indie Music Interviews – Jerome Lee

 

Indie Spoonful Reviews “The Suits” – Jerome Lee

 

NeuFutur Magazine Review “The Suits” – Jerome Lee

 

The Music Butcher Music Blog Review “The Suits” – Jerome Lee

 

Sister Dorothy’s Music Blog Review “The Suits” – Jerome Lee

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Tell us your opinion on using social media to promote music online.

Social media has a good place for artists promoting their music online.

 

But I think social media sites should be used wisely, and I think that artists should be careful not to rely on social media websites to be their sole place of web exposure.

 

Social media websites can change without notice to the user, and your data can be in jeopardy if you do not monitor the site.

 

Instead, an official website with an assigned web address for the artist is still the best online foundation for any independent artist.

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Tell us about your music career.

My music career has been one of the most traveled experiences that I could have imagined.

 

Being able to play, read, and write music has allowed me to venture out into the world and create and share music with other artists with confidence; any language barrier was always overcome instead by communicating with each other by playing music together.

 

I have been fortunate to have played and recorded so many different styles of music with a lot of people, and I am glad that much of the recorded music made is still available for people to discover and enjoy.

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Tell us what still motivates you to go on with your music career.

I still love to play the bass. It is a joy to simply continue to do just that.

 

But career wise I still hear the words of my wonderful songwriter / teacher Pete Luboff ring in my ears; “All it takes is one good song to change your entire life”. I would say that statement has continued to motivate me to keep going forward.

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Tell us about you as a person.

I love music, and I love to create new music. I like a lot of major music artists, and I like a lot of lesser known independent artists as well.

 

I like history, and I like to know where things come from a lot of times.

 

I also read all of the manuals to all of my gear and software, guess I’m just that way.

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Elaborate on the story behind the song.

This song and its spirit came through me as a realization of a life experience that so many of us as people have shared. When we are encountering rain that falls straight down with real intensity in our lives, especially when we are outdoors, those moments in the rain bring about many thoughts in the mind that can be challenging to us.

 

But when the rain stops suddenly, there is a peace in those moments that is singular each time we encounter them. There is a quiet stillness, and when one is outside not even the birds or other animals are heard for several moments.

 

It is during these moments of quiet and serenity after an intense rain where the origin of this song arose within me and allowed me to respond to its peace and beauty.

 

It mirrors what happens in our own lives as we encounter our own intensely raining moments.

 

 

But when the rain stops, as it always does, we have a sense of peace within us once again.

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Tell us the process involved in making this song.

The process in making “First Peace After The Rain” was a fun one for me.

 

The bass line came along first, and I got an opportunity to play an electric upright bass with percussionist / drummer and friend Daniel Kloza and experiment and have a bit of fun at a local rehearsal room.

 

I played the bass line and told Daniel which direction my arrangement was going and he learned it and played the whole song in a short time.

 

I took the rehearsal recording home of the two of us playing the song and my ideas grew from there.

 

I took a while to record and arrange the music. But the lyrics came to me quickly and I had to write them down on the spot. I am glad that I did because they are now on the recording that you hear today. It’s not often that song lyrics flow through me and I don’t make any revisions or changes to them. But it happened this time, and I feel glad that I felt in touch with the spiritual side of myself when it happened.

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Tell us about your future music projects.

Here in early 2019 I am currently working and playing bass on a new music project this time led by the great guitarist Johnny Hyatt; his music is high energy rock and roll, and hard rock.

 

I am also in the beginning recording stages for my next single release.

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Tell us if you will change the style of your music to get signed.

Change my style of music to get signed to a record deal?

 

I probably already have during my career with the many music bands that I’ve had the opportunity to work with.

 

The music they played was not necessarily my own personal style of music per se, but I was and still am willing to make sure that whichever band’s music I work with or record with has all that it needs style wise for it to hopefully be a successful offering.

 

And in my own career, at this point it would be better for me to play the style of music that is in my heart these days, it feels better for me to do so.

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Elaborate on this song.

My song “The Suits” is a commentary on both my own life experiences and the experiences of others who have encountered those in societies who are in control politically and financially and wear the suit garment.

 

The person in the song wonders what their life might be if they too were to wear a suit garment, and in the song’s outro you can hear that person thinking about the new and possibly better life situations that could be had from wearing a suit that are never really answered by the song’s end.

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Tell us if you have a guideline or standard set for your music production.

I do have a high standard for my music production, and I am strict with myself when it comes to recording and publishing my own music for others to experience.

 

I also work on recordings made by several independent artists over the Internet, and that can vary from me either creating or recording bass lines for their material, or sometimes it can be a request for either a mix-down or a mastering session for their music.

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Tell us your preparation for a live performance and how you make sure the quality of sound is high.

When preparing for a live performance in public, rehearsals are key in finding sweet spots in the music for my bass sound.

 

I record most or all of any band rehearsals that I’m involved in on a portable digital audio recorder. Then at home and after listening to the rehearsal recordings I’ve made, if I need to make changes to my live bass sound I will carefully construct or modify the sounds that I have in my bass effects unit before the next band rehearsal. At that point, I am dialed in much better and I am then prepared to move forward to the live band performance.

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Discuss how to live healthy.

Eat food that is good for you as often as possible, especially as one grows older. Several years ago, I was able to lose a good deal of weight by changing my diet and staying with an exercise regimen. And to this day, I have been able to keep the weight off of me.

 

Be careful of what you say out loud about yourself, and always show yourself respect and love so you can respect and love others.

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Tell us if you are in control of your performance or you are still learning.

I am quietly celebrating my 50th year of bass playing, so I can say that I am in control of my performance at this point.

 

I am also glad that I was able to gain control of my performance as a performer and musician at an early age, so I feel very fortunate.

 

But truth be told I am always learning from the music itself as well as from other musicians because of the challenge presented to me to continue producing something new from myself and for other artists.

 

The learning potential from music seems to have no real boundaries, allowing artists to embark upon the artistic directions they wish to explore.

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Tell us that precious moment you chose music as a career.

In high school sports as a senior I suffered a broken bone injury to my hand.

 

 My high school orchestra’s conductor was not very happy with me upon discovering this and told me in no uncertain terms that I had to make a serious choice right then between sports and music.

 

And I decided that it was going to be a career in music that I’d follow. When my career in military service ended, and as soon as I was a civilian again, I embarked on a career in music that so far has not wavered much. I have always kept professional music in my life to the best of my ability throughout the years.

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Tell us the greatest feedback you have ever received on a song of yours.

I would have to say it is the recognition I received from the National Endowment for the Arts. I submitted my song titled “Time Gone Away” to them back in 2015 during their 50th anniversary celebration. They accepted my song along with the text and graphics that I sent to them and they created a profile page of me at their website that has now been archived. That to me is very honorable feedback of my song without directly reviewing it publicly.

 

And I also must include Bryon William Harris of BWH Music Group for his excellent review of my single song titled “The Suits”. Bryon really got to the song’s undertone and meaning in his review, and he has truly understood the song’s character and meaning coming from me. It is a great review.

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Tell us your side interest apart from music.

I love to travel, and I think that the many lands of the world are very beautiful places to visit and experience.

 

And I do like great food from the many nations that I have been fortunate enough to visit, and I would say that those culinary experiences are unforgettable.

 

I also like good films and documentaries.

 

And even in this digital age, I still like a good paper book to read.

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Tell us the artist that influenced you.

It’s hard to say that it was just one artist who influenced me. I actually have an Influences Page at my website that addresses this. But to answer the question, I’d say it’s equal parts of influence between my music teachers Mr. Hart, Mr. Tomforde and Mr. Earlanson during my early years on electric and upright acoustic bass; some of my friends named John, Jerome, Buster, and Gary who played the bass in my neighborhoods while I was growing up; and some of the established electric bass players like Monk Montgomery, Jerry Jemmott, Robert “Kool” Bell, Chuck Rainey, Ronnie Baker, Carol Kaye, Stanley Clarke and Alphonso Johnson.

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Tell us if you prefer singing as a solo artist to collaborating with others.

Over the years as I recorded with the music groups that I was in, singing felt like a natural thing for me to do. I found parts in the range of my vocal register with these groups that blended well with their music.

 

It is fun to collaborate with other artists as a vocalist, a nice exchange of ideas seem to flow.

 

But as a solo artist, there are some differences in the recording approach as on one hand I have free reign on what I would like to sing.

 

But on the other hand, with no other person there to bounce ideas off of, I have often allowed the songs themselves to dictate some of the vocal lines and melodies that I produce.

 

Most times though, I don’t feel a particular preference as long as I can sing my parts to the music and hopefully produce a good outcome.

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Tell us the full details of this song.

I began with the lyrics on “The Suits” a long time ago. And I felt some music emerge from me to match the attitude of the song’s essence.

 

It was going to be a much angrier song at first, but the lyrics led me to the overall tone of the song that you hear today.

 

I recorded it in Steinberg Nuendo, which is a powerful audio workstation program. One thing that I am quietly happy with is the fact that I took the time on this song to attend to the drums very closely, and by using the MIDI step writing feature I was actually able to create more human sounding drum rhythm patterns that had no repeat fills anywhere in the song. It takes a long time to do this, but I got better and faster as the MIDI step writing process went forward.

 

I have done my own mastering for a long time now, and I used the IK Multimedia T-Racks24 mastering suite.

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Tell us the organization you will set up to fight a cause and state your reason for fighting the cause.

If I could one day, I would try to set up something to truly assist those who have no home, and fight to survive out in the elements.

 

I worked for a food bank for a couple of years back in the 1980’s so I have seen the dilemma of people surviving in this manner up close.

 

And if I could start another organization, it would be one of a world musician exchange where musicians could live in another country for a year and share their creativity with the musicians residing there. I think that there would be even more new avenues of styles and creations of music if this kind of an international exchange could take place.

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Tell us your mood while performing.

Mostly it is joy that I feel when I perform, and that joy has grown as I have become older. Each opportunity to perform music is very special indeed, so each time I am granted such an opportunity there is joy for me whether I am performing as a solo artist or performing with a music group.

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Tell us the mistakes to avoid in the music business.

Be early to everything. Practice at home and practice as often as one can to be proficient on a musical instrument(s).

 

Do read everything you can about the industry, and here, knowledge really is power.

 

And as independent musicians have been forced really to become their own startups in this digital and Internet era, careful and respectful placement of what is revealed and shared online as a solo artist or a music group is of a high priority to gain any longevity or mindshare with people.

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Tell us your opinion on smoking, health is wealth but people still smoke.

Yes people do smoke, and it is worldwide. People do have a right and an opportunity to choose whether they smoke or not, and smoking has gone on for many thousands of years now.

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State your artist’s name and elaborate on it.

Jerome Lee. It’s pretty simple really. In my family, many years ago my younger brother began to work in terrestrial radio and he had his own show. He used his first and middle names to identify himself with his radio audience.

 

I liked what he had done, so I asked my mother if it was alright for me to do the same thing with my own first and middle names to use for my blossoming music career. She said yes, and I have gone on with that name ever since, up until this day.

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State the title of the song and the meaning.

“The Suits” is a reference and an observation from one person’s point of view from their interactions with those wearing a suit garment, and how they feel that their life might be possibly improved by wearing a suit themselves.

 

The title “First Peace After The Rain” describes the feelings so many of us have during a heavy rain in our lives, and how there is peace for us when the heavy rain stops falling.

 

Mobile Version

Kfir - Outta Love

Kfir – Outta Love

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kfir - Outta Love

Kfir – Outta Love

 

 

 

 

 

 

Artist Name – Kfir

 

Song Title – Outta Love

 

Genre – Pop

 

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Kfir has released a second single entitled “Outta Love” from the artist’s fierce new E.P. “Free Delivery.”

 

It could be said that Kfir’s entire life has led up to this moment. From being raised by his mother who was a professional singer to performing in Phantom of the Opera on Broadway, Kfir has always been surrounded by music and art.

 

 

His release, “Outta Love” puts a seductive, melodious spin on his meaningful lyrics.

 

“Outta Love” released on Valentine’s Day, following the soaring success of his first single “Drama Queen”.

 

With his “James Bond Pop” vibe and honest lyrics, “Outta Love” conveys the mature, soulful delivery that will drive Kfir towards a successful career, while taking the risks necessary to create true art.

 

The highly anticipated EP “Free Delivery” was released shortly after the single, with plenty of visual and audio content tailor made for music lovers.

 

“Free Delivery” was created with friend and producer Pablo San Martin and co-written with Javier Cardellino.

 

He collaborated closely to create a provocative, full-bodied sound that puts forth a message of freedom, bravery, and pure entertainment.

 

Kfir on his work:

“I feel like this is my most mature and fun writing to date – A total departure from my past sound since I started writing music.

 

I called the EP “Free Delivery” for two reasons: While I wasn’t sure what I was going to name it; I was hunted on the subway by a red free delivery sign.

 

When I finally thought about it, I realized that my writings on the E.P. are totally honest with the subject matter, and for me it was a free delivery of the truth.

 

With no filters or trying to edit myself in order to fit in, I created the music for me first!

 

I just wrote honest lyrics and themes in hopes that the material will touch someone the way it touched me!”

 

Free Delivery E.P. was written by Kfir M. Danieli, Javier Cardellino, and Benjamin Samama and was produced and mixed by Pablo San Martin. The E.P. was recorded at Esoteric Studios in Brooklyn, New York.

 

About Kfir

Kfir is a music performance artist currently based in New York, New York.

 

His musically diverse upbringing instilled a love of music and performance that grew with him.

 

Kfir has spent his life pursuing his passions, which took him from his classical ballet training, to Broadway, to now releasing his first EP.

 

Kfir developed himself as an artist writing poetry, eventually expanding upon that and adding music to his words.

 

After his dance mix single “Heart After Dark” went to number six on the UK pop charts, he was able to raise the money he needed to fund his newest endeavor, “Free Delivery”.

 

Mobile Version

Los Vertigos – Keep on Running

Los Vertigos – Keep on Running

 

 

 

 

 

 

Los Vertigos – Keep on Running

Los Vertigos – Keep on Running

 

 

 

 

 

 

ARTIST NAME: Los Vertigos

 

SONG TITLES: Keep on Running

 

ALBUM TITLE: Rock and Soul Salvation

 

RELEASE DATE: January 1, 2019

 

GENRE: Rock and Soul Revivalism

 

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Tell us how you build up the tune for this song.

We channel the spirit of Rock and Soul.

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Tell us the best means of becoming a famous artist and selling more records.

Winning over each and every potential fan with a performance they will talk about for days.

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Tell us how fans are reacting to your music.

They are usually mentally and spiritually exhausted after listening to our music.

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Explain how to deal with fear on stage.

We are fearless because each audience member is our friend.

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Tell us your point of view on the quality of production of today’s songs to old songs and point out what you think has changed.

We prefer to record live in real time as they did in the days of analog recording. We only overdub lead vocals and lead guitar. It’s a more honest way to record.

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Tell us how you come across the lyrics of this song.

We were inspired by the music of William Edward “Little Willie”.

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Tell us your best means of expressing yourself.

Performing the music of Rock and Soul Revivalism.

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Tell us your opinion on using music to deliberate on issues affecting people like corruption, immoralities, politics and religion.

Rock and Soul Revivalism crosses all barriers and unites all people.

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Discuss how you plan to create a timeless music that your fans can cherish forever.

Only our fans can decide that.

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List the names of individuals you can point out as legends and state your reasons.

Al Green, Little Willie John, Roky Erickson, David Bowie, Joe Tex, Lou Reed, Wilson Pickett, too many to mention – They have all influenced our sound.

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Tell us your viewpoint on discriminating.

All discrimination must end.

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List your favourite authors.

William S. Burroughs

 

 

Charles Bukowski

 

 

Larry McMurtry.

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Tell us your greatest song and state the reason.

We haven’t created our greatest song yet – Maybe someday.

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Elaborate on your artist name and the title of the album.

The name Los Vertigos was inspired by two bands: Peru’s Los Saicos and Austin’s The 13th Floor Elevators.

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Share your press release and review with us.

Rock & Soul Salvation:

 

Los Vertigos are proud to announce the release of their new E.P., Rock and Soul Salvation (Recovery Recordings).

 

This new body of work is available on Amazon, Spotify, iTunes, Deezer, YouTube, and Apple Music for streaming and downloading – and very, very soon – on Pandora. Tangible copies of this CD are available at all Los Vertigos concerts.

 

CD Release Update:

 

The Los Vertigos remake of “Devil with the Blue Dress,” was spun nationally, in the US, by Genya Ravan, on Friday night, March 15th, 10:00 PM (CST), on SiriusXM Radio, Channel 21, Little Steven’s Underground Garage.

 

History:

Los Vertigos also known as The Vertigos, established in 2006, in Houston.

 

Los Vertigos refer to their sound as “rock and soul revivalism.”

 

Los Vertigos’ name was inspired by two of drummer Koop Kuper’s favorite bands: Lima, Peru’s proto-punkers, Los Saicos (pronounced Psychos) and Austin’s psychedelic pioneers, The 13th Floor Elevators.

 

Personnel:

Bruce Ross – Lead Vocal, Bass, and Rhythm Guitar

 

Bryan Ross – Lead Vocal, Rhythm Guitar, and Percussion

 

Koop Kuper – Drums and Background Vocals

 

Michael Swede – Lead Guitar

 

Background:

Bruce and Bryan Ross, originally from Chicago, are identical twins who have been working on their harmonies their entire lives.

 

Lead guitarist, Michael Swede, is a corporate transplant from the Swedish city of Gothenburg (south of Stockholm).

 

Drummer, Koop Kuper is a native Houstonian and a blogger.

 

Favorite Past Performances:

Continental Club & The Big Top Lounge, Houston

 

City of Navasota Summer Concert Series, Navasota

 

Saint Francis Wolf Sanctuary Fundraiser, Montgomery

 

Re: hab Bar on the Bayou & Darwin’s Pub, Houston

 

Irish Stew Cook Off @ Lucky’s Pub, Houston

 

Center Fest!, @ the Brazoria Arts & Science Center, Clute

 

Music Night on the Strand, Saengerfest Park, Galveston

 

Food & Wine Festival, Convention Center, Galveston

 

KPFT FM Fundraiser, Dan Electros Guitar Bar, Houston

 

Watermelon Festival, Last Concert Cafe, Houston

 

Lone Star Biker Rally, Oaks Bar, Galveston

 

Republic of Texas Biker Rally, Travis County Expo, Austin

 

Kemah Boardwalk, Weekend Performance, Kemah

 

Bay Area Alliance Car Show, Challenger Stadium, Webster

 

Not-South By Southwest, Opa Bar & Grill, Austin

 

Miscellaneous:

In March, 2017, Los Vertigos performed their first showcase at South By Southwest Music Festival in Austin, TX, by invitation of radio disc jockey, “Big Kev” Plougoft, of WLVR FM, in Bethlehem, PA.

 

“Big Kev” became a fan of the band after seeing them perform one evening while traveling through Houston several years ago.

 

Los Vertigos are members of the Houston branch of the American Roots-Rock Coalition. The ARRC is a grass-roots organization whose mission is to curb the excessive use of midi-sequencing in popular music and through its outreach program, expose today’s youth to the virtues of public performance utilizing analog musical instruments.

Last year (2018), Los Vertigos performed at the Navasota, Texas “Summer Concert Series.” When asked by the Navasota Examiner how the band felt about performing in Navasota, vocalist Bruce Ross replied:

“It is our honor to be asked to perform for the people of Navasota,” said Los Vertigos vocalist and bassist, Bruce Ross.

 

“We are especially moved to be able to perform in the hometown of the iconic, Texas blues legend, Mance Lipscomb. This concert should be a lot of fun for both those in attendance and for our little band.”

 

Mobile Version

Louie Bello – Laugh Love

Louie Bello – Laugh Love

 

 

 

 

 

 

Louie Bello – Laugh Love

Louie Bello – Laugh Love

 

 

 

 

 

Louie Bello is a Country R&B artist / songwriter who can be seen in venues from Nashville to Los Angeles.

 

He recently finished his first European tour playing in Spain, Portugal and London and has taken the stage at many national music festivals such as Milwaukie Mile of Music Fest, Musik Fest, Boston Fest, Red Gorilla Festival, SXSW…

 

Louie has written theme songs for PBS, ESPN, had a publishing deal with Sony, and had his original songs featured on the television shows such as Lincoln Heights, Keeping up with the Kardashians, and The Real World.

 

Louie has recently opened for Country stars Tyler Farr and Eric Paslay…

 

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Mobile Version

Aries Marquis - Daydream

Aries Marquis – Daydream

 

 

 

 

 

 

Aries Marquis - Daydream

Aries Marquis – Daydream

 

 

 

 

 

 

ARTIST NAME: Aries Marquis

 

SONG TITLE: Daydream

 

RELEASE DATE: January 18, 2019

 

GENRE: Pop / R&B

 

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Aries Marquis was born April 20th, 1987 in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

 

Both of his parents come from musical backgrounds, so it is no surprise that Aries would have music coursing through his veins.

 

His father, Kenneth Johnson, sung in choirs, and with his brothers, later on becoming a music manager.

 

His mother, Jacki Johnson, was a choir director for several churches, a soloist, and singer in a band.

 

By both parents, Aries received plenty of musical influence: from listening to Gospel legends such as Daryl Coley, the Hawkins Family, and Vanessa Bell Armstrong, to the soulful melodies of Anita Baker, Barry White, Freddie Jackson, and many more.

 

Aries Marquis felt fortunate to be a 90s kid surrounded by so much music to the point that his musical diversity expanded so far as even dance and even video game soundtracks.

 

Aries started to sing in his mother’s choir at the First Presbyterian Church of Scotlandville when he was five years old. Although he sang in choirs for many years, including school choirs, he never stepped up to become a lead singer at all.

 

Aries didn’t know, or believe that he could actually stand alone and sing, therefore, he never attempted to. It wasn’t until his 12th grade year of high school that he finally attempted to sing a solo at a talent show rehearsal. He chose to sing the traditional Gospel song, “Blessed Assurance”, and although he was extremely nervous to the point of forgetting some of the words, he still received a standing ovation from all of those that were present. From that day forward, he felt confirmation that he had a voice that he could use as a lead singer.

 

Upon graduation, he enlisted in the U.S. Army in 2006. Marquis would sing from time to time, and his fellow soldiers would hear him, and be astonished, but it wasn’t until he decided to write a small song for his voice mail, at the end of that same year, that he received confirmation that music was his destiny.

 

Many people heard the voice mail song, and he started getting so much attention for it, that even people who called his number, by mistake, would call back to hear it again. His dad was one of those who heard the song, and foresaw the talent of what Aries could become, and discussed managing his son.

 

Being groomed and managed by his dad, Aries started writing music in 2007, and linked up with another singer named Renaldo Pryce, in 2008, forming the duo group, J2.

 

For the next year and a half, managed by Aries’ dad, Kenneth Johnson, J2 would wreak havoc in the local music scene, putting on soulful performances everywhere they went. They performed in malls, clubs, and even on local television, where they had garnered some of the highest ratings on those local stations when they performed.

 

Aries and Renaldo were a force to be reckoned with, until tension started to rise between management and Renaldo, and impatience for success along with talks and thoughts of solo projects started to rise.

 

In 2010, this forced Aries Marquis to go solo. As a solo artist, Aries Marquis was and is determined to create a sound that is ageless, soulful, and diverse. One thing Marquis is against is music that sounds the same, and can be forgotten within a month. Therefore, becoming a student of music, he follows behind his musical influences of the past, and present. Starting from scratch, Aries would go on to perform in many places from Hollywood, California, Lufkin, Texas, and New Orleans, Louisiana, to name a few places, even opening up for legendary R&B singer, Keith Sweat in 2014.

 

Aries Marquis’ music would also go on to play on many indie radio stations across the country, even appearing on the CMJ Hip-Hop charts with a collaboration titled, “Ole Scotlandville” with hip-hop artist HeEro, also, in 2014, playing on over 150 college stations across America, and Canada.

 

His performances would rack up three 1st places, one 2nd, and one 3rd place awards in talent show cases, and becoming the 2013 Breakout Artist of the Year for the 2013 Independent Entertainment Summit in North Hollywood, California.

 

His journey still continues as his fan base continues to grow, and his music still continues to improve, and impact the masses in ways that not even he could dream of.

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Tell us what your fans are saying about your music.

So far, I have had fan interactions vary from me being told that my music being good, to my music leaving them speechless. My main thing is to deliver a song with everything I have within me, if I do nothing else. I want the listener to experience what I am writing and singing – So far, so good.

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Tell us the factors you consider in choosing a song as your favourite.

When it comes to me choosing a song as a favorite, my first factor is the soulfulness of a song. I don’t care what the genre is; I want to feel what is being delivered from the artist or musician. I want to hear the song being delivered with passion and feeling, and not just sung.

 

Next, I listen for the chorus of a song. It all comes down to how much the chorus makes me want to stand up in awe! I am a sucker for harmonies, so choruses with harmonies is everything.

 

Next, is the lyricism – I know this is coming in late, but the reason is that if a song has good lyrics, but none of the previous things I have listed, I will be disappointed. Reason being that an artist should deliver their lyrics just as the mood is described within the lyrics. If the lyrics are about love, then I would expect the delivery of the song to be as such. If it is about being joyful, I wouldn’t expect it to be boring, and bland.

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Tell us the names of producers you will collaborate if you have the chance.

Well, if I had to choose a few producers to collaborate with, I would choose Greg Kurstin, who helped Adele produce songs on her 25 album, and Timbaland, whom I have always admired.

 

Timbaland’s work with one of my favorite artists, Justin Timberlake, is enough for me. Greg Kurstin, I believe, would help bring out some pretty soulful hits, so I’d definitely love to work with him. I definitely liked what he did with Adele.

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Tell us the names of the songwriters you will collaborate if you have the chance.

Songwriters would be more difficult to choose, because the way I write requires only my songwriting skills. What I write is based on my own true experiences, so I never really thought of who I would like to write with.

 

Nevertheless, if I were to write with others, I would want to duet on a song, or collaborate an entire project, so with that being said, I would get someone like Gavin Degraw, Justin Timberlake, or Dua Lipa.

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Tell us your favourite TV show and state your reason.

Honestly, I barely watch TV. I do sometimes, but that’s mainly sports.

 

Nevertheless, there are only two shows that I actually watch from time to time, and the shows are ‘Star’ and ‘Power.’

 

I love ‘Star’ for several reasons, of course one being that it is about the music industry, and the other is because one of my favorite singers, Luke James, is in the show as a character named Noah.

 

I love the show ‘Power’ because it is full of suspense every single episode. It has enough actions and suspense to make you just forget about watching anything else.

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Tell us your best mood to create a song.

The mood that I have to been in is a relaxed and focused mood. Like, when I begin to write, I have to repeat a certain part in my mind in order to get in the zone, and then the rest of the world is gone, and it is just me, my ideas, and the pen, or digital notepad. I can write through distractions, but I don’t recommend it.

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Tell us your interpretation of fame or success.

My interpretation of success is to doing what you love to do without having other things that you don’t want to do interfere with it.

 

In other words, I love to do music, and I want to make a living off of my music. The issue is that I still have to clock in and out of a 9 to 5 until I am able to live off of what I am doing with my music. The day I am able to live only from my music is when I will be successful.

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Tell us the names of artists you will collaborate with if you have the chance.

There are quite a few artists I would love to collaborate with if I had the chance: Justin Timberlake, Adele, Jamar Rogers, Kelly Clarkson, Sam Smith, Luke James, and quite a few more.

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Tell us about your experience performing on stage for the first time or recording in the studio for the first time.

Back in 07, I got in the studio for the first time, and I just felt like I had been in there before. It wasn’t too unfamiliar with me, for some reason. I just got in the booth, and started to record this song I wrote, titled, “I’ll Always Be Here”. It was really fun. At that time, I was in a duo group called “J2”.

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Tell us how you approach songwriting.

When it comes to approaching writing music, there are two ways I begin the writing process: do I write about what I’ve experienced, or do I write about what I’ve witnessed…

 

There are no made up subjects, no matter how “fun” a song may sound. I want all of my music to be based on something true and real so that the listener can relate to what I create.

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Tell us your opinion on blending genres or experimenting with sound.

I think that blending genres and experimenting with sound is excellent, because I do the same.

 

The main reason I classify myself as a pop artist is because I don’t have one particular sound.

 

Take my album, “Salvation: The Arrival” for an example: I wrote an up-tempo pop love song titled, “For Life”, and went completely soul and inspirational with another song named “Better Days”, with a slight mixture of rock, hip-hop, and pop on another song titled, “Ready to Fly”.

 

I feel that music should be diverse, because if you write what you truly believe, moods and experiences differ, and so should your sound.

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Tell us how you deal with rejection.

Rejection motivates me. I always think back to how many people rejected artists such as The Beatles, or Tech N9ne.

 

I know for a fact that rejection doesn’t mean you aren’t good enough, it just means that you are too good for certain people. That is how I look at rejection.

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Elaborate on what compels you to sing.

The thing that compels me to sing is touching the deepest part of those who are listening. I love to see the reactions and hear the responses of those who are touched by my vocals. I love it.

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Tell us the comparison between digital recording and analogue recording.

Honestly, I haven’t really recorded using on any analogue equipment. I have heard, according to certain people and opinions that the quality of analogue is better than digital, but I will have to test it out, one day, to hear it for myself.

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Tell us how you record your vocals.

When I record my vocals, I am looking to, as stated before, deliver the soulfulness, or mood of the song that I am singing.

 

Delivery is everything to me. If no one can feel what you are singing, then what is the point of singing it?

 

I also love using a lot of harmonies, so I tend to use that a lot, although in my future projects, I will be mixing it up a bit.

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Tell us the software you used mostly for recording.

I am a Pro Tools man. I love it, and don’t think I will switch away from Pro Tools being my main DAW, although many have tried to persuade me to go to other systems. I am stubborn and loyal.

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Discuss the selling of CDs and selling of digital files through digital stores.

In my opinion, it is easier to sell digital files compared to CDs, because you have to be more active, on foot, to sell CDs compared to simply promoting your music online, from the comfort of your home, and people going to get your music.

 

Moreover, many don’t purchase CDs like they used to, so that becomes another hurdle to climb over.

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Elaborate on the song.

So my latest song, Daydream, is a follow-up to my up-tempo summer song, Crush.

 

Daydream is about me thinking of the many things I can do with this woman that I am falling in love with, although we just met. I think about her so often, that as we are getting closer, I tell her the things that I think about when I think of her.

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Elaborate on your artist name and the title of the album.

My name ‘Aries Marquis’ is simply my first and middle names.

 

Many told me that it was commercial and unique before I even became a solo artist, so I stuck with it.

 

Mobile Version

Antonio Orrico - Urban Legends

Antonio Orrico – Urban Legends

 

 

 

 

 

 

Antonio Orrico - Urban Legends

Antonio Orrico – Urban Legends

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Antonio Orrico – Urban Legends

 

Artist Name – Antonio Orrico

 

Song Title – Urban Legends

 

Album Title – Urban Legends

 

Genre – Jazz

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Antonio Orrico is an Italian guitarist, educator and composer. He currently lives with his family in Johannesburg South Africa.

 

Over the years he has been involved as a session player and composer for some of the top South African TV Shows and Adverts as well as performing with many local and international artists.

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Go into detail on why you decided to choose music as a career.

I have always been a musician. I started at age 8 with the recorder, soon after then piano and finally upgraded to guitar at age 14. I know it sounds corny but I didn’t have to choose, music chose me.

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Brief us the feedback you are getting from fans on your music.

I was completely overwhelmed by the response of my fans. Upon release on the 22nd of December 2018, Urban Legends soared to #2 in the Top Selling Jazz Albums on Google Play Italy and stayed in the top 10 for over 5 weeks.

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Discuss the relevance of social networking to music.

We live in an exciting age for musicians; technology has broken down many barriers in so many ways.

 

Social media is definitely a major player in the success of a musician nowadays.

 

To build a following and connect with fans has become much easier than ever before.

 

I have been fortunate enough to be able to build a good following in the guitar community over the years, thanks to my education courses and that has definitely played a big part of the initial success of the album.

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Tell us how you record your song.

My recording process is very simple. I look for good melodies, chord structures or riffs then I write the back bone of the song midi in Logic.

 

Once I have a solid structure and I’m happy with the arrangements I call in a few friends and record a live rhythm section (Drums, Bass and Keys).

 

At last when I have everything ready I do all my mixing and mastering.

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Tell us the story behind the album.

I always wanted to release my own instrumental album, but being a working musician and jingle writer I’m always busy in the studio working on different projects.

 

Around August 2018, while I was going through my hard disk, I found a collection of unfinished songs that I have been writing over the past couple of years. It was like these songs were imploring me to finish them and give them life… I couldn’t resist.

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State your musical skills.

I’m a professional jazz / rock guitarist and jingle writer. I studied guitar with some great teachers in Italy, Bruno Marrazzo and Colombo Menniti, and arranging at the Berkeley College of Music.

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Tell us how long it takes to complete a song from the start.

I have produced jingles in just a few hours in the past, but for the songs on my albums things are different. It’s just the style that requires more attention to details and very often the support of live musicians. The whole process of writing, arranging, sessions, mixing and mastering can take easily three days.

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Go into detail on how you develop the melody.

Being an instrumental smooth jazz / blues album, the guitar is king and every note carries a lot of weight.

 

I normally would need a couple of hours to craft the perfect take and develop a strong melody for the verse, chorus and solos. Having said that I’m not always that pedantic, for some of the songs a few takes were enough to get what I was looking for.

 

In the end you want to keep it fresh and real as much as possible, over producing a take can kill the natural vibe of a song, especially in this genre.

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Discuss music in full details.

What you hear in Urban Legends is a mix of the different genres that I like to play: jazz, blues and rock. I am fascinated by modern music and sounds yet I always had a foot in the past if you know what I mean. I tried to keep that balance as much as I could in this work.

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State your five favourite genres of music with reasons.

I was born (musically) listening to the classic rock of the 60/70.

 

In my early teens my uncles would feed me Jethro Tull, Led Zeppelin and Deep Purple. I just loved the guitars and the whole raw vibe of those bands.

 

I was introduced to Fusion and Classic Jazz by my guitar teacher Bruno Marrazzo a few years later and that was also a big milestone for me as it opened my eyes to another world.

 

Playing guitar now meant much more than just the pentatonic scale and a few power chords. It was a great school for me; I learned a lot trying to play solos from Charlie Parker, Wes Montgomery, Pat Metheny, Mike Stern and so on.

 

As I started to play for a living I wanted to get into the session scene and there’s very little space for jazz there. That’s when I started going back to rock / pop and relearning how to keep it simple and straight to the point. Players like Dann Huff and Jerry McPherson were big influences at the time.

 

In the early 2000 I started building my home studio and wanted to develop my skills as a music composer / producer.

 

At that stage I was fascinated by movie scores and mood music for TV shows and started listening to artists like Hans Zimmer, Ennio Morricone, John Williams, Thomas Newman and still do.

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Discuss your rehearsal.

Getting ready for a tour or a show is so much fun when you have the right musicians. The key to a great performance is to do the prep work right, surround yourself with great musicians and give them the space they deserve.

 

I always have charts ready that I hand down before the rehearsal that saves us an enormous amount of time and resources. The last thing you want is to waste precious time learning the songs.

 

I cannot afford my own exclusive band and I to use session musicians. These guys are busy bees and I cannot expect them to spend hours of their time trying to figure out my songs. That gets everybody in a good state of mind and keeps it professional, we play a song a couple of times and we are ready to go.

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State your favourite musical instruments.

Guitar, keys and bass.

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Describe the chemistry between you and your fans during a live performance.

Always a good time.

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Discuss your music career.

Over the years he has been involved as a session player and composer for some of the top South African TV Shows and Adverts as well as performing with many local and international artists.

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List your musical work.

Here is a short list of some of the TV Shows and Jingles he has produced music for as well as some of the Multi-Platinum Artists he has had the pleasure to work with: McDonald, Knorr, MultiChoice, Emperor Palace, Jamali, Kabelo, Wian Vos, Liesl Graham, Louis Van Rensburg, Heintje Simons, Evan Schoombie, Anais, D-Rex (aka David Campos), SABC Sport, Woza 2010, 7de Laan, Top Billing, Wufukezele, Walk The Plank, L’at Wie…

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State the title of your favourite song in the album and the meaning.

Eternal Sunshine is my 10 years old daughter’s favourite track on the Urban Legends album. So I thought I would dedicate it to her, my Eternal Sunshine.

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State the title of the album and the reason for choosing the title.

I had Urban Legends in mind as an album’s title for a long time. The idea that fictional stories are believed as true by the people on the street has always fascinated me for some reason.

 

You know the expression “They say so” so must be true? Well doesn’t sit well with me. Some things are rooted in pop culture and yet no one can tell me who are “They”?

 

Being an instrumental album you have no lyrics to get inspiration for your titles. You only have the music, the moods and your imagination.

 

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Joy Crookes - Since I Left You - Demo

Joy Crookes

 

 

 

 

 

 

Joy Crookes - Since I Left You - Demo

Joy Crookes – Since I Left You – Demo

 

 

 

 

 

South London’s finest soul-bearing songstress Joy Crookes has shared her heart-breaking brand new single ‘Since I Left You.’

 

The new track comes alongside a brand-new headline date in London at the prestigious Jazz Café on the 5th June which sold out in just 30 minutes.

 

 

‘Since I Left You’ is the latest instalment in Joy Crookes beautiful repertoire, picking up on all the heart-breaking but empowering themes she broached in her most recent E.P. ‘Reminiscence.’

 

Never one to shy away from the brutal truths that come with falling in and out of love, on ‘Since I Left You’ Joy tackles the space that grows between two people when they part ways.

 

Dripping with honesty and mesmerizing, soulful fragility one will expect from Joy’s music, it’s a poignant ode to moving on and looking forward at the most difficult time.

 

The accompanying video is the perfect visual partner for the song featuring Joy and her younger brother Christopher.

 

It’s been an enthralling start to 2019 for the 20-year-old Londoner who headlined a sold out Omeara in London at the end of February.

Her first release of the year – her ‘Reminiscence’ E.P. received a wealth of praise from fans and critics alike.

 

 

Radio 1 picked her latest single  entitled Two Nights on their introducing playlist.

 

It was an E.P. that celebrated her Bangladeshi heritage and paying tribute to the woman that raised her.

 

 

The themes that flow through Joy’s music and are more present than ever on this brand new stand-alone single ‘Since I Left You.’

 

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Two Door Cinema Club - Talk

Two Door Cinema Club – Talk

 

 

 

 

 

 

Two Door Cinema Club - Talk

Two Door Cinema Club – Talk

 

 

 

 

 

 

Two Door Cinema Club have released a fascinating video for the brand new single ‘Talk’.

 

Unveiled on BBC Radio 1 as Annie Mac’s ‘Hottest Record In The World’, the track is an off-kilter modernist pop master-class, combining synth and electro-pop elements, spiraling left-field with broad-side shots of wonky disco.

 

‘Talk’ is the band’s first new music since the success of 2016 album Gameshow – yet another UK top 5 album from the Bangor three piece and a campaign which saw them sell out two nights at London’s Alexandra Palace, draw one of the biggest Pyramid stage crowds of the weekend Glastonbury and complete the album cycle with a glorious headline set at London’s Community Festival in Finsbury Park – a show that saw them selling 35,000 tickets, marking their biggest headline show to date.

 

Two Door are a band who have spent their careers breaking down, reshuffling and rebuilding the parameters of pop.

 

The hooks, humour and wry social commentary that have kept them streets ahead of the field for the last decade added to the value of ‘Talk.’

 

Speaking about the new song, singer Alex Trimble explains:

“I love the pop thing. I love experimenting and going to different places, I love doing things that are wonky and I love doing something we haven’t done before, why can’t we do all of those things at once? That’s what it was, doing whatever felt right… It sounds like Two Door Cinema Club – not a Two Door Cinema Club there’d ever been before but that’s what I love. We can always do something new but it always feels like something we’ve done.”

 

Long-time collaborator Jacknife Lee (U2, The Killers, REM) recorded and produced ‘Talk.’

Namibian-German conceptual artist and designer Max Sidentopf directed the stunning video of ‘Talk’ (who made the news with his Toto Forever installation).

 

‘Talk’ is also Two Door’s first release on the Prolifica Inc. label, a new venture with PIAS and their long-standing management company that puts the band in control of all aspects of their recordings and career.

 

With over 2 Million albums and 1.5 Million tickets sold worldwide, and over 2 Billion Streams and 300 Million views on Vevo and YouTube, with ‘Talk’ Two Door Cinema Club continue their dominance as one of the UK’s brightest and most enduring success stories of recent years.

 

Two Door Cinema Club are Alex Trimble, Sam Halliday and Kevin Baird.

 

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Jade Bird - My Motto

Jade Bird – My Motto

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jade Bird - My Motto

Jade Bird – My Motto

 

 

 

 

 

Jade Bird has dropped her triumphant new single entitled ‘My Motto’ via Glassnote. It is the latest single from Jade’s upcoming debut album due for release on April 19th, 2019.

 

Jade Bird is one of the UK’s most treasured new voices.

 

‘My Motto’ sits at the heart of Jade’s album, summing up everything she’s become so well-loved for.

 

The amazing song elaborates on the awareness that sometimes, to save yourself, you need to give up the painful cycle of trying to fix a relationship and move on, ‘My Motto’ is a soul-baring masterpiece destined for greatness.

 

‘My Motto’ is another remarkable taste of what is coming on Jade’s first full-length in April.

 

It also comes in a long line of magical singles that have cemented Jade as one of the UK’s most exciting new talents.

 

Her pure and raw sound has also set her out as being a total breath of fresh air in the current musical landscape.

 

Jade is touring in America, supporting Hozier and Father John Misty and Jason Isbell and when she returns, she will support Tom Walker on his UK dates too…

 

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