Nathan Seeckts – Old Blood

 

Nathan Seeckts - Old Blood

Nathan Seeckts – Old Blood

 

ARTIST NAME: Nathan Seeckts

 

SONG TITLE:  Old Blood

 

ALBUM TITLE: The Heart Of The City

 

GENRE: Americana

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Nathan Seeckts is a powerful singer-songwriter who effortlessly fuses the sounds of Americana, folk, country, and blues delivered with a commanding voice that is equal parts gravel and passion.

 

His songs feature intricate, heartfelt storytelling that echoes loudly and honestly from personal experience.

 

Taking inspiration from the songbooks of artists including Bruce Springsteen, Jason Isbell, Lucero, and Steve Earle, his songs could find him comfortably at home in any bar from Melbourne to Memphis.

 

Seeckts has been writing, recording and performing as a solo artist since 2010, self-producing and releasing three EPs during this time.

 

Each pressing of these EPs has long since sold out, but are still available online.

 

Since the start of 2017, he has been hosting a weekly Americana-based radio program on community radio station 94.7 The Pulse called Last Night In Town. Through the program he has been able to promote, support and share the amazing work of his peers within the Australian alt-country community, broadcasting over 85 shows so far.

 

Honing his sound through bars and stages across Australia and North America, and with appearances at Queenscliff Music Festival, Tamworth Country Music Festival and Melbourne’s Poison City Weekender under his belt, Seeckts has also supported many fine Australian artists including The Teskey Brothers, Archie Roach, You Am I, Tex Perkins, Cash Savage and Raised By Eagles, and international luminaries including Joe Pug, Big Country, Courtney Marie Andrews, and Deer Tick.

 

The Heart Of The City, recorded by Roger Bergodaz (James Ellis & The Jealous Guys, Raised By Eagles, Freya Josephine Hollick) at Union Street Studios, was successfully crowdfunded by Seeckts using a Pozible campaign in just three days.

 

Seeckts smashed past his first target to almost double his initial goal by the end of the 30 days, allowing him to press the album on vinyl. The production of his debut album was able to blossom and bloom thanks to the strong support of his grassroots supporters.

 

Trying to capture the energy and passion of his live shows, a majority of the album was recorded live in only two days, with a backing band consisting of Sean McDonnell on electric guitar/slide, Matt Dietrich on bass and Mark McLeod on drums and percussion.

 

The versions of the songs Houselights and Moonlight Creek which can be heard on The Heart Of The City are the first takes of each song.

 

The remaining overdubs, including additional instrumentation and vocals, were later added to the album by Seeckts and also from the following guest musicians. Golden Guitar nominee Gretta Ziller (backing vocals on Thunder and Rain, Sirens and I’m Your Queen), Nathan Barrett (backing vocals on Thunder and Rain and Old Blood), Kat Chish from The Ramshackle Army (violin on Moonlight Creek and I’m Your Queen) and Rory Millar from The Mojo Corner (harmonica on Whiskey Drunk and All Night, Hold Tight).

 

The Heart Of The City features all the qualities that make Nathan Seeckts a standout artist in the Australian Americana scene; his ability to craft engaging stories of love and loss, his combination of alt-country and folk, and his commanding and indelible voice – equal parts gravel and passion.

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Discuss your recording experience with your producer. 

Working with Roger Bergodaz at Union Street here in Melbourne was one of the best experiences I’ve ever had as a musician. He allowed me time and support to develop the songs and the overall sound he helped me to capture is exactly how I wanted the record to sound.

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Discuss what comes first and last while creating a song. 

It really depends on the song, sometimes it’s the lyrics, sometimes it’s the chords.

 

For me, mostly I try to find a melody to match the chord progressions and start improvising lyrics to bring the melody out. From there I build upon what I’ve captured in the demo I make as I do this.

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Tell us the piece of advice you will give to a new artist. 

Hard work and hustle – If you’re willing to put in the work on the back end and you’ve got songs that you really believe in, you’ll be fine. Also, play for the people who are there in the room, not the ones who didn’t turn up.

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Tell us how you deal with rejection. 

Over the years I’ve learned to develop a thick skin, that’s really all you can do. Remember and thank the venues and radio stations that support you along the way and find a way to work with them again. Not everyone is going to be a fan of your work, so you appreciate those who are.

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Tell us what you are doing to impact the people around you. 

I always try to create stories in my songs that people around me can relate to. If it gives people some joy or the chance to reflect upon their own lives then I’ve been successful.

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Tell us the music that makes you happy. 

Whenever I need a pick me up, I go straight to the Stax catalog. Soul music and that Memphis sound can turn pretty much any day around for me.

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Tell us how you feel when you sing and your fans sing along to your song. 

Over the years I’ve been blown away whenever I look out and see people singing along to my songs. There’s a stack of great parts on this new record that I hope will inspire more folks to sing along at the shows.

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Tell us the goals you aim to achieve when creating a song. 

My goal has always been really straightforward, to create solid, engaging stories for people to believe in and connect to. At the heart of each song of mine is sincerity. I think that’s one of the reasons why people are connecting to this new record so much.

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State your approach to writing. 

Years ago a friend of mine introduced me to the works of Pat Pattison, a professor at Berklee College of Music who teaches songwriters how to use sense memory and object writing to create better songs. I try to use his writing techniques to keep my brain trained and ready to write on the fly.

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Tell us how you plan to develop a unique music style. 

I honestly don’t think there’s anything uniquely special about what I do. There are plenty of dudes with beards and funny hats playing Americana these days, so if I can create songs with good hooks and relatable stories then that’s all that I can do.

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Tell us how to record a song.  

For this album we live tracked all the songs at Union Street Studio in Melbourne over the course of a couple of days, to try and capture the raw energy on the live shows.

 

From there, the band and I built on what we had to try and create a solid collection of ten tracks.

 

Having such talented friends that could come in and add harmony parts or extra instruments on some of the tracks was amazing!

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Tell us if you are collaborating with other songwriters or you write alone. 

I tend to write alone, but co-writing is something I’m definitely keen to try out at least once or a couple of times. The challenge is getting on the same wavelength I guess.

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Discuss your experience with fans. 

I ran a Pozible crowdfunding campaign to help get the record made and my fans were amazing. People that I hadn’t heard from in years came out to show their support which blew me away. The people who come to my shows and genuinely love what I do are the best. Whenever I look out and see them singing along it always puts a huge smile on my face.

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State your experience with booking gigs and shows. 

Being from a regional area, booking shows has always been a challenge, but this year I’ve been a bit more methodical in my approach to how I book tours and shows, planning things well in advance and working alongside venues, bookers and artists who I’ve developed strong relationships with over time.

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Tell us if you consider a song placement in TV or Film. 

Hell yeah, I would! One day I want to write a song that’s used in the closing credits to a film. That’s my aim!

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Elaborate on the song. 

Heading into the studio, Old Blood was one of the last songs I’d finished. In the rehearsals leading up to the recording, we really struggled to make it land. I knew there was a great song in there, but for some reason, the lyrics and the music just weren’t sitting well together.

 

When I went to record the vocal track for it, it still wasn’t quite right. It didn’t have the same believability or honesty as the other songs on the album.

 

So I went home with a rough mix of the band’s tracks and totally rewrote the lyrics and vocal melody to the song from scratch within two days.

 

I went back up to Union Street later that week and everything just came together and I found the song I knew was in there all along.

 

Lyrically, it’s a cautionary tale. I’ve always said there’s a fine line between pride and arrogance and that sometimes it’s hard to tell the difference.

 

That’s what the protagonist in this song fails to learn until it’s too late.

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Elaborate on the title of the album. 

The Heart Of The City for me relates to the people and the stories and lives that they live. Each one of the songs on the album contains a story that could take place in any city across the world.

 

Mobile Version

Brett Benowitz – Lamb

 

Brett Benowitz - Lamb

Brett Benowitz – Lamb

 

ARTIST NAME:  Brett Benowitz

 

SONG TITLE:  Lamb

 

ALBUM TITLE: Burn To Glow

 

GENRE: Rock

 

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Tell us how to refine a demo to a mastered song.

Start with an idea, play it over and over until it becomes a full-fledged song, present it to your band and jam on it until you can perform it live, and then take it to the studio, get a good producer who knows you and can see your vision. Record it, add new tracks, mix and master and boom, you’ve done it.

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Discuss the processing involved in creating a song.

I usually start with a cool guitar lick and base the lyrics around what emotion that conjures from me and also what I happen to be feeling/thinking/going through at that moment in time.

 

For “Lamb” however it was different. I started with a melody that got caught in my head one day as I was coming home on the subway.

 

I immediately recorded a voice demo, picked up my guitar and shaped the chords around that melody and came up with something really special. The lyrics just fell into place after that.

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Elaborate on the theme of most of your songs.

Lamb is about heartbreak but I’ve written many love songs too. I tend to write about positive messages: fighting for your dreams, never giving up, owning who you are, and believing in yourself and something bigger than yourself.

 

But I write about dark subjects too: the inevitability of death, depression, loneliness, and feeling lost.

 

I try to express myself through many sentiments because life is full of ups and downs, light and dark, joy and pain, etc.

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Tell us your greatest musical works up to date.

My best works are my newest songs that I just finished or am finishing. I can’t wait to record them.

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Tell us those behind your music process.

Just me and the people who enrich my life enough to provide ammo for writing – I write a song, bring it to my band, and they help realize it and take it even further.

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Tell us how you are handling the promotion of your music.

Mainly Instagram, Facebook, YouTube, radio campaigns, playlist campaigns, and hitting up all my friends and fans via text message and direct messaging to come to my shows.

 

Playing as often as possible without wearing myself out, shooting videos, doing photo shoots, etc.

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Tell us your future goals and how you aim to accomplish.

I want to tour the world with my music and make enough money that I can create a charity for people suffering from extreme poverty.

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Tell us what you think has changed in the music industry.

Technology, social media, and the ability that anyone anywhere can make music given the proper tools.

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Tell the greatest mistake to avoid while making a song.

Not coming from the heart and writing for others and not yourself.

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Tell us how you boost your performance.

Meditate beforehand, drink a lot of water, psych yourself up, and just enjoy it!

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Explain the structure of the song.

Lamb is intro – verse – chorus – verse – chorus –  epic chorus – outro.

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Discuss how the instruments come together for a song.

Started with the simple guitar, bass, vocals, and drums, but when I got to the studio the producer suggested adding a b3 organ which I loved. So I wrote an organ part and it fit so perfectly and just completed the song.

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State your musical skills.

Singing, guitar, bass, and piano.

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Tell if you consider acting in a movie.

Definitely! I’m an actor!

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Tell us how you eliminate noise in your recordings.

Tell everyone to be quiet. I just let the producer or engineer handle that.

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List the name of artists you cherish most.

So many but top 5 are The Red Hot Chili Peppers, Jimi Hendrix, John Lennon, Jeff Buckley, and Nas.

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Tell us how you get inspiration.

Finding inspiration is all about how you view and process the world around you. Inspiration is everywhere you just have to be open to it.

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Elaborate on the song.

Lamb portrays the dark side of love: helplessness, spite, cruelty, callousness, and heartbreak. Instead of love ‘completing’ you, it removes your power, imprisons you, tortures you, abuses you, and ultimately destroys you

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Elaborate on your artist name and the title of the album.

It’s just my name; I wanted to stay true to myself. Burn To Glow is inspired by a quote by Victor Frankl, “What is to give light must endure burning” in other words we have to struggle to bring out the best in ourselves.

 

Lamb is the first song on the album, the first half of the album is the burn: the struggle, the second half is the glow: the resolution, the final song is titled ‘Something to Believe in.’

 

The album is a journey from burning to glowing metaphorically.

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Pancakes and Whiskey

 

Mobile Version

Kygo + Rita Ora – Carry On

 

Kygo + Rita Ora - Carry On

Kygo + Rita Ora – Carry On

 

Kygo the iconic music maker teams up with Rita Ora to release a compelling song entitled ‘Carry On’ as the lead single from the soundtrack to the upcoming film, Pokémon Detective Pikachu (2019).

 

Jonathan Singer-Vine directed the music video and Colin Tilley produced it.

 

The audience will be wowed by the dramatic performance and authentic vocal of Rita.

 

The instrumentation keeps haunting and inviting.

 

The lighting of the video is dull, but the production is outstanding.

 

The animation is stirring and inviting.

 

Lyrics are meaningful and Rita excellently nails her vocal on the beat.

 

The switching of various scenes with beautiful colours adds to the quality of the video.

 

Rita’s vocal is expressive and easy to understand.

 

The song is driving and tuneful.

 

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Mobile Version

Bard Edrington V – Espadín

Espadín by Bard Edrington V and The Palm in The Cypress

 

 

 

 

 

Bard Edrington V - Espadín

Bard Edrington V – Espadín

 

 

 

 

 

ARTIST NAME:  Bard Edrington V

 

SONG TITLE:  Take Three Breaths

 

ALBUM TITLE: Espadín

 

RELEASE DATE: April 29, 2019

 

GENRE:  Americana

 

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Anghami

 

The journey begins in Tennessee, where Bard was raised.  Returning home to the south for three years, he digs deep into the music that influenced him there, Appalachian Mountain music (Rendezvous Duel, Southern Belle) and Delta Blues (Spread my Wings, Riverside Blues, and Mississippi Flows).

 

He takes those influences to Mexico where he lived with his family for a year, playing music with his wife to earn a living.

 

The culture of Mexico, from stories of the simple farming lifestyle of the Mezcaleros to the exuberant emotions of Mariachi horns, soak into “Gold and Black Mare” and “Take Three Breaths”, while “Mango Tree” simply rejoices in Mexico’s succulent tropical climate.

 

“Take Three Breaths” carries the listener on a journey south down the Camino Real.

 

Bard leaves Santa Fe to move his family to a small fishing village in the state of Nayarit.  The travelers dive across the border to get sideswiped in Sonora, pay bribes in Mazatlan, and pass a 40’ tall Virgin Mary in Sinaloa.

 

The anchor of the album, Espadín, takes place deep in the heart of Oaxaca.  There, you can smell the smoke from the wild agave piñas as they cook in the ground.  The traditional transformation of wild agave into distilled mezcal is told in the title song “Espadín.”  Follow the Mescalero to his hidden spot “where the espadín grow wild for twenty years or more.” The anchor of the album is found in this song when Karina Wilson’s solo quartet emerges “like sweet water from under the mountain”. Boris McCutcheon’s coaxing of melodies out of the mandolin takes the listener deep into the arroyo.

 

Bard returns to New Mexico, his heart home, to tell the stories of other travelers who tried to bridge the worlds of “back home” and the new frontier in “Painted Pony”, “Gold and Black Mare”, and “Rendezvous Duel”.

 

In “Rendezvous Duel” the narrator, Kit Carson, comes back to visit his wife and sits down to tell her all his stories and then asks to hear hers.

 

“Maidenhair” comes out from deep in Slickhorn canyon along the San Juan River in Utah, where canyon wrens sing the song of falling rocks and maidenhair ferns’ green, silky leaves spill out of cracks in the earth.

This is the life once explored by pioneering people of the 19th century, deep, slow travel where worlds met and cultures integrated.

 

Bard keeps this pioneering spirit alive and documents it in sound.

 

In Espadín, we travel to new lands and experience new possibilities through the eyes and inspiration of this sincere and enormously creative artist.

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Explain how to overcome writer’s block. 

A simple answer is to seek out inspiration.  But sometimes the inspiration is there but the words are not.  My technique is to find a melody or chord progression that evokes an emotion, and then continue to play it, sometimes days, until it pulls the lyrics out of me.  Usually, the inspiration comes quickly.

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Tell us the tricks behind making a hit song.  

The truth – If you are true to what you believe, then it’s a hit.  It might not get a million YouTube views or whatever is deemed a “hit” these days, but it can be a hit in the eyes of the writer – And, making the song easy on the ears and easy to jump right in and follow.

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Tell us how you get feedback for your demo before working on it.

I record all of my demos on the GarageBand app on my iPhone.

 

When I’m starting to write a new song I might have three versions of it recorded on my phone and spend a couple of days listening to them as I drive around.

 

I like to get the song in my head so that I can continue to work on it even when I’m not around my instrument.

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Explain your recording experience in the studio.

It differs.  On “Espadín” I tracked multiple songs with just myself and the drummer in the room. We set it up so that there was some bleed, to give the live feel.  Recording with just the drummer is nice because I don’t have to think about what the fiddle player or bass player are doing.

 

I just lock in on the rhythm and do my part.  It gives me more space to focus on my vocals and guitar parts.

 

“Take Three Breaths” was recorded like this.  Then we added all the other tracks to the original live recording.

 

I go into the studio with a template of an idea for a song and then sometimes that gets thrown out the window.

 

I let the other musicians do what they are good at – If they are inspired by the music than it comes out naturally.

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Tell us how you compose.

By feel – Nothing ever gets written down.  My songs do the composing for me.

 

When I write a new song it’s very evident what the instrumentation will be on it.  The hard part is not adding too much.

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Tell us if you add effects to your vocals to sound better.

Sure, reverb and echo – Kind of the standard.

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Tell us your opinion on music education.

I wish I had some.  Sometimes I hear musicians who went to music school are amazing players and composers, but they have no soul to their music and no grit.

 

And then I hear educated musicians who have it all and have blended the soul into their ability to play whatever note they want.

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Tell us how you relate with other artists.

I keep competition amongst other artists out of the picture.

 

I want to connect with them on a musical level and share inspiration and techniques.

 

I play with a lot of musicians here in Santa Fe, NM.  I like to mix up my band so that nothing gets stagnant.

 

I want fans to not know what to expect when coming to see me live.

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Tell us if you can collaborate with an artist of a different genre.

Absolutely – That’s what’s great about music.  It’s a language with lots of different dialects.  But sometimes you don’t have to know the dialect to be able to communicate.

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Explain how to finance a music project.

Work my ass off in my day job.  I don’t do crowdfunding. I’m not into asking people to donate money to me so that I can make an album.  I’ll ask you to buy it and support me that way.

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Tell us how to generate income from a musical work.

I wish I knew.  Right now I just play gigs and record and encourage people to come to shows and support me.

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Explain the process involved in recording a vocal.

Some songs are easier to sing than others and I can nail it the first take.  Other songs, depending on how it’s recorded, we will do a few vocal takes.

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Elaborate on the song.

“Take Three Breaths”

 

In 2016 my family and I moved to a small fishing village in Chacala, Mexico.  We lived and worked there and our sons were in a local school.  It was an amazing cultural experience for us all.

 

When we moved there, a friend and I drove down the 1,500 miles from New Mexico.  Along the way, we had many experiences.

 

We got sideswiped just across the border in Sonora, paid a bribe to a cop in Mazatlan and then once we arrived in Chacala we hit the tequila and wrote ‘Take Three Breaths.’

 

This is the most produced song on the album.  The production of the music was such that I wanted to capture the dramatic chaos feeling we had during the trip.

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Elaborate on your artist name and the title of the album.

Bard Edrington V is a family name.  Bard means a poet and a keeper of stories.  The music I make is based around the meaning of the Bard.

 

Espadín is a type of agave that is native to Mexico and is used in the process of making Mezcal.

 

Mobile Version

Sam Fishman – Voices Emerge

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sam Fishman – Voices Emerge

Sam Fishman – Voices Emerge

 

 

 

 

 

ARTIST NAME:  Sam Fishman

 

SONG TITLE:  Voices Emerge

 

ALBUM TITLE: End of Time

 

GENRE: Rock

 

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In 2004, Sam was chosen to lead a percussion ensemble across Europe; performing contemporary percussion compositions.

 

Starting in 2006, Sam studied music at the University of Rochester where he pulled talent from both the River Campus and Eastman Conservatory to form various projects and recordings.

 

He was also the principal drummer for the U of R Jazz Ensemble.

 

It was during his time in Rochester that Sam honed his skills as a versatile drummer/bandleader performing reggae, jazz, hip hop, rock, and soul music.

 

Sam took on the role of performer and producer with his release of “Stained Glass and Technicolor Grooves”, featuring renowned jazz pianist Misha Piatigorsky.

 

Sam’s latest effort is a genre-bending experience known as “End Of Time.” Since its release in July 2018, the recording has received much praise from critics.

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Tell us how you build up the tune for this song.

It’s all about being crafty. The song begins with some atmospheric effects behind a repeated rhythmic guitar phrase.

 

Next, the entire band kicks in (drums, bass, and more guitar layers) minus vocals. Leaving the vocals out at this part makes for an effective shift when the vocals come in on the first verse.

 

For me, everything in this song leads up to the guitar solo over a newly introduced chord progression. I wanted this part to be as cathartic and cinematic as possible.

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Tell us the best means of becoming a famous artist and selling more records.

If I knew the answer to this then I would already be famous and selling more records! One thing that’s safe to say is there is no best way.

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Tell us how fans are reacting to your music.

So far, from several reviews and blog posts, fans are enjoying this adventurous concept album.

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Explain how to deal with fear on stage.

Luckily I’ve never experienced any real fear on stage. I do get butterflies every now and then, but it’s usually because I’m excited to show people what I can do!

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Tell us your point of view on the quality of production of today’s songs to old songs and point out what you think has changed.

This is something I am quite passionate about. Quality of production has definitely gone way up, but unfortunately, this has created a school of thought that strives for perfect sounding songs.

 

When your song sounds too perfect, it loses dynamics and feeling.

 

Music, in my opinion, should be felt. There is perfection in imperfection.

 

Drums on many new rock recordings sound bland and lifeless.

 

Luckily, there are still many bands that want to keep the drums dynamic and natural sounding.

 

If you go back and listen to Motown records, you can really feel the groove with the band. The recordings may not be very loud or perfect sounding, but the vibe is there. For me, it’s all about that vibe and the material itself.”

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Tell us an interesting experience in your music career that is significant.

I remember being in the studio on a couple of occasions where the producer was telling me exactly what to play on the drums. I mean, exactly.

 

There was no room for me to improvise or really feel the vibe of the song. This was significant for me, to be exposed to such a narrow-minded way of producing. It was because of this experience that I knew what not to do as a producer.

 

There must always be some wiggle room for musicians so they can be empowered to let their personality shine through.

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Tell us how you come across the lyrics of this song.

Ryan Acquaotta, the singer and lyricist of this song says it best…This song is a little ambiguous I guess. I was playing with the thrill of escapism, of the feeling of potential in dropping everything and getting away from what may feel like it’s dragging me down. That tends to be my first reaction to stress, is “I’m done. I quit. F*ck this…”

 

But I think that reaction is in fact quite dangerous, and what can initially feel like an ascent into freedom turns out to be momentary. What goes up must come down.

 

Usually, I’m best served if I take a little while, spend some time sitting in meditation or walking in nature. Give myself a little time and space to quiet my brain and heart down, and listen to what’s really going on inside of me. Then I can usually see what I actually need to do, and it’s rarely run away from everything.

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Tell us your best means of expressing yourself.

Performing on the drums allows me to express myself fully. In a jazz setting, there is a lot of room for improvisation so I’m able to really let go and get creative.

 

Having a one on one conversation is another means to express myself. When talking with someone you can open up to, the words just flow and you can really open up about what you’re feeling and thinking. This is really important.

 

Producing new projects is also a great means to express my creativity. I enjoy telling stories and using music/voice actors to do it.

 

I’m always looking to create something that feels fun and new, and a bit quirky for sure. Why be like everyone else? Stand out!

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Tell us your opinion on using music to deliberate on issues affecting people like corruption, immoralities, politics, and religion.

Using music to deliberate on social issues is great! However, there is a fine line for me. The lyrics should add to the music, not take away.

 

I’ve been in certain situations where the lyrics actually got too political and harsh, ruining the song as a whole. Say what you need to say and make a statement, but do it so it brings the music to a new level.

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Discuss how you plan to create a piece of timeless music that your fans can cherish forever.

This is definitely my goal. I would not want to create music that loses relevancy after only a few months. (Unfortunately, this is a trend in a lot of mainstream music).

 

The production needs to feel organic, and the lyrics need to deal with issues that have been ongoing for many years and will continue to be in the public discourse.

 

I always use Pink Floyd’s Dark Side of the Moon as an example of timeless music. The album came out in the 70’s and is still considered one of the best albums of all time.

 

Concept albums feel timeless. They really tell a story and create an experience.

 

Timeless music is unique. It has a lot of heart and is not trying to follow any trends.

 

My newest production is in the style of a sci-fi B movie and follows in some traditions that have been around for many decades. This is perhaps what makes music timeless, following in the tradition that came before.”

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List the names of individuals you can point out as legends and state your reasons.

Bob Marley. Still known by so many up and coming generations. His legacy continues to live on.

 

Miles Davis. A jazz pioneer, his album ‘Kind of Blue’ is a classic and a staple of all jazz listening.

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Tell us your viewpoint on discriminating.

It’s wrong to discriminate!

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Tell us your favourite books and state your reason.    

Cat’s Cradle is my favourite book. The story compares and contrasts science and religion in a brilliant way. I’ve never been so intrigued by reading this book.

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Tell us what triggers your creativity.

The artwork is one thing that triggers my creativity. Simply looking at a painting that speaks to me will often trigger an idea for a song or album.

 

Collaboration is another trigger for me. When you can find the right people to work with, a free exchange of ideas can flow and you never know what you’ll end up with.

 

A third trigger is observing human tendencies. Patterns of behaviour will spark ideas for social commentary.

 

There are also times where I’m just in an open state of mind and allowing ideas to come to me.

 

I always feel that I am simply a vessel for ideas to flow through and it’s up to me to latch onto the ones that I feel are meant for my undertaking.

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Tell us how you generate musical ideas for your composition.

For my latest project, I would sit down with my guitarist for four hours at a time and we would just try things out. That’s it!

 

There’s a lot of back and forth, and it all comes down to decision making. “Do you like this riff?” “Yes?” “Ok, let’s build on it.”

 

One exercise I like to use it to create the form of the song before any music is actually shared.

 

Try adding in chords, riffs for each section and make them flow together once the form is decided. It’s a big musical puzzle!

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Tell us your greatest song and state the reason.

Well, the most recognized song is “Stolen Lives.” It was a finalist at the USA Songwriting Competition.

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Tell us how you compose your song.

“Voices Emerge” was composed as an instrumental first with Kurt Wubbenhorst.

 

The instrumental was then sent to Ryan Acquaotta and he wrote the lyrics and melodies.

 

After that, I had Alex Goldenthal lay down a sick guitar solo, followed by an orchestral arrangement by Brandon Campbell out in Los Angeles.

 

There are also vocals by the Bergen Academies Chamber Choir and Christine Nevill. It’s a big collaboration.

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Elaborate on the song.

This song has such a cinematic feel to it. It starts as ambient rock and roll, turns into a cinematic and cathartic hard rock song, and then transforms into a beautiful orchestral theme. There’s a lot going on for seven minutes!

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Elaborate on your artist name and the title of the album.

Natural Drummer LLC is actually the name of my production company.

 

As an artist, I am Sam Fishman.

 

The album title “End of Time” is dark in its meaning. Texting while driving, depression, escapism, mass incarceration…these are all themes on the album, so it feels as if time is nearing its end and may stop at any moment. Yikes!

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Lodato & PollyAnna – Sober

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lodato & PollyAnna – Sober

Lodato & PollyAnna – Sober

 

 

 

 

Lodato teams up with PollyAnna to drop an amazing song entitled ‘Sober.’

 

The song is one of a kind.

 

‘Sober’ is a catchy song with a symphonic vocal and inspirational instrumentation pleasing to the ears.

 

The performance is impressive.

 

Duration of the song is not so long but the audience will enjoy to the fullest under the magical power of the striking vocal.

 

She sings in a storytelling way while the instrumentation goes in harmony with the vocal thereby giving birth to a new brand acoustic song.

 

Wonderful production and arrangement add to the quality of the song.

 

One can feel the power of music from the start to the end of the song.

 

‘Sober’ is compelling.

 

Excellent delivery of words and the deep lyrics make the musical work more interesting.

 

Level of musicality is high.

 

The production is extraordinary.

 

I think a new star is born into the music industry.

 

We look forward to more songs from Lodato & PollyAnna.

 

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Mobile Version

Superstar – Change Gon Come

 

Superstar – Change Gon Come

Superstar – Change Gon Come

 

ARTIST NAME: Superstar

 

SONG TITLE: Change Gon Come

 

ALBUM TITLE: CM2: Between The Church & The Streets

 

GENRE: Hip Hop

 

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SuperStar was born Justice Demetrius Richardson on July 24, 1987, to Eugene Richardson and Lilly Pardlow.

 

He is the second oldest of four children. He was raised in a strict Christian home until his mother and father got a divorce. That’s when he learns he has to decipher life from religion.

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Tell us your names and country of birth.

Justice Richardson – United States.

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State your academic qualification.

High Diploma.

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Elaborate on your music career, band name, experience, and skills.

I have been in music my entire life but rapping for just over ten years.

 

My music is based on my life. I understand hip-hop has changed a lot in the past ten years.

 

My goal is not to be considered one of the GOATS of hip hop but to be more like the Martin Luther King/ Malcolm X of hip-hop.

 

I’ve been through a lot in my life and I intend to share my pains and triumphs through my music with the world.

 

My main influences in hip hop are Jay-Z and Lecrae, but also include T.I., Jeezy and Kanye West.

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Tell us your genre and idea behind your song.

Hip-Hop is the genre of my music. When I wrote Change Gon Come a close friend of mine lost her son to street violence & another close friend of mine was battling cancer. I was also going through a tough time in my personal life so I wanted to write a song that would inspire people to keep believing.

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Tell us how you are promoting your music.

Right now I am submitting my music to as many radio stations and blogs as I can just to get my music out and my sound out there. I am also trying to gain more followers on my social media pages.

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Explain the story behind the song.

This song is the story of a street guy that is trying to walk the straight and narrow by working a 9 to 5 but he is struggling to make ends meet. He is also chasing his dreams in music and trying to stay out of the street life but it seems that everything that can go wrong does until he remembers trouble doesn’t last always.

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State the names of other members of your band, music producer, crew or music video director.

My music is produced by Aaron “Kidd” Donaldson for Kidd K Production.

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Tell us how long you have been in the music business, your experience, and your future goal.

I’ve been in the music business for just over ten years. I’ve had my ups and downs but the love of music has always kept me coming back. My end goal is to use my music to build my independent label to help independent artists get a head start in their careers.

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Tell us what makes you unique from others.

I’m myself and no one else can beat that better than me. I don’t move to the latest trends just because that’s what everyone else does. I know who I am as a person and an artist and that’s what I stick to no matter what.

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Tell us your weakness and strength pertaining to music.

I’m not big on metaphors when I rap but my honest lyrics make up for that.

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List your five favourite songs including the artists.

Lupe Fiasco – The Show Goes On

 

Jay-Z – Moment Of Clarity

 

Jay-Z – The Story Of OJ

 

Kanye West – Jesus Walks

 

Jay-Z – Say Hello

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Tell us your position on “Do It Yourself” and signing to a major label.

I prefer to stay signed to my independent label; I want to own all my own music. I can appreciate the resources a major label can provide but I don’t mind working hard for myself to get to where I want to be.

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Tell us other activities you are pursuing apart from music.

I have my own clothing line I’m launching.

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List your various works.

CM2: Between The Church & The Streets Album

 

#JWWM- Single

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State your artist’s name and elaborate on it.

SuperStar – I got my stage name from my aunt. She was there for me when I was going through a depressing time in my life and she said: “I’m going to start calling you SuperStar.” People are going to be drawn to you and you’re going to help them overcome various life issues.

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State the title of the song and the meaning.

Change Gon Come, the meaning is as simple as the title of the song. As long as you believe it, it can happen. Change Gon Come.

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State the title of the album and the reason for choosing the title.

CM2: Between The Church & The Streets, this album name came from my internal struggle of trying to be a good Christian but struggling with the street mentality I developed during my adolescent years.

 

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