Oceans Over Airplanes – Traditions

Oceans Over Airplanes

 

Oceans Over Airplanes – Traditions

Oceans Over Airplanes – Traditions

 

ARTIST NAME:  Oceans Over Airplanes

 

SONG TITLE: Traditions

 

ALBUM TITLE: Traditions EP

 

GENRE: Alternative Post Emo

 

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Interview with Anthony Pagorek – Frontman of Oceans Over Airplanes (Vocals, Bass).

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Discuss your existence.

The band formed as a need that I had to create different music from what I was previously playing.

 

Eight years ago I was in another band and that for me creatively was not where I wanted to be.

 

I needed another outlet for the ideas in my head and found myself writing music that would no longer work for the band I was in.

 

I didn’t want to shelf any of it, I wanted to perform it.  So initially, Oceans Over Airplanes (OOA) was only supposed to be an acoustic project.

 

However the more I played the music for people, the more I wanted it to be something more elaborate.

 

So I started recruiting other musicians and it turned out to be a full band.

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State your favourite genre of music and your reason.

I would say alternative, but I am talking 90’s alternative when the title was new and fresh and was way more specific than it is today.

 

For me it was the music that inspired me to pick up a guitar, to want to be in a band, to listen to music in general.

 

I love the raw feelings and emotion during this time period.  The songs didn’t have to be perfect, they worried more about the emotion in the performances and that emotion is what I connected with and still love today.

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State your experience as a musician.

I have been playing music since I was young.  I played saxophone throughout grade school – Actually Alto, Tenor, and baritone sax.  Then I made a huge mistake and quit in High School – Terrible Idea.

 

I would be a much more advanced musician I think if I would have had those additional years of formal music theory.

 

In High School and College I was a “seasonal” musician, I dabbled in guitar, drums, and bass, basically playing when there was some kind of competition or event.  It was way more of a hobby.  It wasn’t till after college that I started to focus on playing guitar and songwriting.

 

I was primarily a guitar player in my first bands after college and when OOA began I was a guitar player.

 

However, due to the needs of the band, I switched about four years ago to bass full time.

 

As a singer, I didn’t start singing until after college.  I sang out of necessity.

 

I wanted to start writing my own songs; I wanted to start playing open mic nights.  So I was all I had, so I had to figure it out.  I have been a lead singer in a band ever since.

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Tell us the theme of your song.

‘Traditions’ is about the ending of a friendship that was very important to me.  Unfortunately, you see the signs sometimes and it’s not a matter ‘if’, it’s a matter of ‘when.’

 

And when any relationship ends we go through phases right?  Usually, we start confused, maybe shocked, then we get angry and resentful.

 

But I think as we mature we tend to try to be more level headed.  In this case, it caused me to move to a phase of concern/ sympathy for this person in the end.

 

I was less worried about a friendship ending and more worried about what was happening to this person.

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Name the people behind your success and thank them on this platform.

My wife is a huge supporter of this band and our music.  She has been my barometer for years.  She is completely honest with every song I create, every lyric, etc.  It’s great having someone that honest in your corner.

 

I also want to thank our lawyer, Brian Rosenblatt.  He has been a believer in this project for a long time now and has offered us many opportunities along the way.  He finds ways to motivate and set goals.

 

Obviously, our friends and family that support us – These are the people that seem to always find time to support us at shows, buy a shirt, or tell a friend.

 

We have been lucky to have parents that still don’t think we are nuts trying to be full-time musicians.

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State your future goals.

The goal now is fan-focused.  We want to focus more than ever to connect and bring regular content to our fan base.  More music, more behind the scenes, more pictures, just more.  They deserve it and we want to find ways that we can continue to grow this band and bring them along for the ride.

 

In general, we just want to play for as many people as possible.  I feel that we have something that is worth saying, something that is worth sharing and something most importantly that people can connect with on some level.  I feel that we bring an energy that can help people escape from life for a bit.  We want to share that experience with as many people as we can.

 

But we want to be able to get more and more into the festival season/scene.  I want to play Riot Fest, Official SXSW, Lollapalooza, Hangout!, etc.  We want to play overseas especially in the UK and European markets.

 

Finally, we want to be able to support ourselves fully with our music.  Not looking for millions, just enough to support our families.  To wake up every morning and just know that I have to play to crowds or create music with my friends would be the goal.

 

We are currently looking to build out our team. Seeking Management, etc. to help us achieve these goals.

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Share your press release and reviews with us.

“OOA’s brand of emo/alternative rock in a way that begs you to listen to more….”

– Underground Music Collective

 

TPIG Podcast Interview

 

“Featured as a band performing that are about to blow up”

– Infectious Magazine

 

New Noise Magazine

 

“I’m Music” Magazine

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Elaborate on how you think your music is inspiring your fans.

The majority of our songs are rooted in relationships.  Who you choose to surround yourself with will ultimately shape who you are at the moment.  I think our music helps to celebrate, navigate, and/or cope with whatever state your relationships are in.

The longer I have been doing this project, the luckier I feel.  The lifestyle and demands of making music aren’t for everyone, it changes once you take it past the hobby stage for many.

 

In general, our band celebrates the idea of dreams and pursuing them.  To have passions and believing in them.  I know that’s the example that I am setting for my daughters as I continue to work at this.  I hope that our passion for this rubs off on others to fuel their passions.

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Analyze the transformations you have discovered so far in the music industry.

It has changed so much in the past decade.  I have seen the old model and I have been trying to navigate this new model that still evolving every day.

 

I am disappointed that many bands are not given the grooming and ability to grow that they use to have.

 

Labels use to sign bands with the knowledge that they would need to grow, mature, evolve, etc.  But they helped align bands with producers and helped define their image and every other aspect of who they are for better or for worse.

 

Now there is no artist development as we know it.  Labels want ready-made products.  They don’t have the time to invest in bands like they once did due to budget restrictions – Which leads me to the next major discovery – That because the value of music has decreased with the influx of content, listeners don’t seem to linger very long on new music.  Instead, they are drawn to the next thing, which could be the next day.

 

Bands have to have constant content to stay relevant.  You can’t disappear for two years to create an album anymore.

 

It is a shame that the creation of all your content, album art, liner notes, packaging, is all a thing of the past.  It used to really mean something to the artist, to share this visual component to accompany the music – Which further served as a way of creating music videos that were cohesive, tours, merch, etc.

 

People just don’t consume music like they use to and it’s been a tough transition for sure.  Especially because it takes months to do everything mentioned above and most people will listen to the album and by the end of the day/week already move onto all the other music coming out daily.

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State the artists you cherish most and your reason.

Gin Blossoms – They were this perfect mix of different styles.  They were these guys that wanted to be grunge but had these pop/country sensibilities that they couldn’t hide. It made for a really accessible sound.

 

Lyrically they just always seem to connect with me.  I would say if you were to ask me for my top 10 songs of all time, I would have at least 2 Gin Blossoms songs in my top 10.

 

Phil Collins/Genesis – Growing up this was most of the music playing in my household.  It really showed me that great pop music can really be masked in different ways.  Phil has a way with melody that is so unique.  And it was one of those bands that made me realize how much a band needs to think out everything they can do to help evolve their music.  From album art to amazing live productions.  They wanted their music to affect more than just your sense of hearing.

 

Jimmy Eat World – They made me fall in love with Emo music.  I constantly draw musical inspiration from this group.  They are a band I can always listen to no matter what the mood, the season, etc.  They have this honest, raw quality and they own every inch of it.  Nothing about this music is fake; it’s as personal as it gets.  It has allowed me to be brave with my lyrics over the years.

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Elaborate on how you develop your lyrics.

Lyrics always come last for me.  The song needs to be created. I need to hear the textures, the dynamics, and the overall feel.  I want to write lyrics that match with the landscape that has been created.

 

Most times I get a theme in my head that I want to write about.

 

From there I go through a process of trying to write catchy phrases, one-liners…This is completely random and just more like a stream of conscious writing.

 

From there I find a line or two that I am really drawn to and see if I can write a song based off of those cluster of words.

 

If I think it is strong enough, it’s a constant search for the right words and phrases that help evolve the theme or tell the story.

 

I sift through old notebooks and journal to maybe find lines that can work or I go and look up lyrics from other bands to find collections of words that I can get inspired by.

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Tell us if you enjoy collaborating with other artists or just singing as a solo artist.

OOA would not exist if it wasn’t for collaboration.  Everyone in the band is a contributor.  I couldn’t sleep at night knowing that the band is just my voice.  These songs evolve and come alive in different ways because of every member’s influences and talents.

 

I couldn’t record these songs to sound the way they do without every member in this band.  There is something amazing that happens when the right creative people enter into a space together to create.  It’s the energy that I love the feeling and that I am constantly drawn back to time and time again.

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Brief us your opinion on making music that makes people to dance or making the music with a genuine message that inspires them.

Music that makes you dance is such an easy sell I feel -Especially in a live setting.  It’s just an easy way to bridge the gap with the listener.

 

I love music with a genuine message; however, you run the risk of sounding pretentious and unrelatable.

 

I think in today’s music climate you have to find ways to combine the two or just understand how elements can co-exist.  When you can combine the two effortlessly you really have something undeniable.

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Explain copyright.

It’s just a way of protecting your music and your brand as much as possible.  You work so hard on your music and your image so that it separates you from everyone else.  You want to make sure that you are protected from others trying to steal your vision/creations.

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Discuss the impact of a Performance Rights Organization.

They are in place to help musicians earn the money that is owed to them.  Whether through performing the music live or when their music is used in various mediums (movies, commercials, sporting events, TV shows, and radio).

 

They are also there for offering advice to help you grow as professional and provide health care options, musical insurance options, etc., for musicians.

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Elaborate on how you develop your melody and instrumentation.

It’s evolving all the time.  For this song it was four guys in a room – Once we start having sections figured out, i.e. verses and chorus, I will usually just start playing around with melodies as we are playing the songs.

 

Melodies are constantly changing until I think they are a solid hook.  You have to be able to self-edit and have the honest feeling of whether or not your hook is strong enough.

 

If the song doesn’t have a melodic hook, it doesn’t matter how good the lyrics or music are going to be in my opinion.

 

As we play the song over and over and get a solid structure, we then record the song and enter the pre-production phase, which allows us to hear everything we are doing clearly.  It’s here where we start talking about are we using the right instrumentation, do we need more instrument layers here?  Do we need less here to provide more dynamics?  What style of music are we chasing at the moment?  All of those questions can get answered now.

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Go into detail on the recording of this song.

We recorded these songs with Seth Henderson of ABG studios (Real Friends, Sleep On It, Knuckle puck).

 

It was our first time working properly with a producer.  Until this point, we recorded and produced everything on our own.  So leaving the comfort of our home studio we knew could be challenging.

 

Also, we only had six days to complete the four-song EP.  So having that time crunch was something we never had to compete against.

 

And if all of that wasn’t enough, for me personally it was also beginning a new chapter without one of my longtime music collaborators.

 

So there was extra challenge and moments of insecurity going into this process.  Half of the band was relatively brand new.

 

For ‘Traditions’ we actually wrote the ending of this song the night before we entered the studio to record it.  We felt like the song needed something and we couldn’t figure it out for the longest time.  It was something that happened very organically.

 

This song was huge for us because it finally gave us an identity with developing a sound that we feel is unique to us.   A lot of that “sound” is rooted in the guitars – Which is a fine mix of chorus, reverb, and delay, in many cases constantly stacked on top of each other.

 

That initial swell of guitars was created with a pedal that has somewhat inspired many of our tones today.  It is called the Procession, by Old Blood Noise Endeavors.

 

Drum wise, I remember this being a huge song creatively for Joe.  He really transformed this song vibe and feel with his syncopated rhythms.

 

Melodically, this song was still in flux going into the studio. I wasn’t happy with the chorus.  The final chorus you hear on the record I actually wrote in the studio in my head.  The first time I sang it, was in the vocal booth.  I never practiced it, didn’t know if it was going to be able to hit the notes or if it would have the power it needed to have during that part of the song.  So I was super relieved after singing it at full volume for the first time that it worked.  And the guys agreed right away after I have sung it.

 

Also, that was the most time I have spent in a vocal booth, just the amount of layering that was needed to make the song sound as massive as it does.

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Discuss your music performance.

Many bands live for the studio, while others live for the stage.  I would like to think that the stage is the one place we feel consistently comfortable.

 

We put hours of practice into our set, crafting the order, practicing every transition, to even places where I talk.

 

Currently, we are re-working our set to fill it in with more transitions/intros between songs to make our performance more of an experience.

 

We don’t want to just get up there and play the record exactly like you hear it recorded.

 

We want to give you a reason to come and see us live –  Which is why other elements like lighting, banners, and even stage presence are huge concerns for us.

 

But I can guarantee you one thing about this band.  Whether we play to 1 person or 1,000 people, you are going to get the same show.

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State your artist’s name and elaborate on it.

Oceans Over Airplanes – Originally the name didn’t have any meaning attached to it.  However, over time for me, the words represent a different way of thinking.  That it is perfectly acceptable to live a life that isn’t the “normal”.  Don’t settle.

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State the title of the album and the reason for choosing the title.

Traditions EP – As a band we had many changes going into the recording process.

 

We left the comfort of our home studio, we worked with a producer for the first time, and we also were without one of the original members of the band for the first time.

 

So this was more about breaking traditions and starting a new chapter for OOA.

 

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Christine and the Queens - Comme si

Christine and the Queens

 

 

 

 

 

Christine and the Queens - Comme si

Christine and the Queens – Comme si

 

 

 

 

Christine and the Queens releases ‘Comme si’, the latest single to be taken from her critically acclaimed second album Chris, which appeared on almost every critic’s best of 2018 list.

 

About the track and video, Chris says, “There is an obvious and addictive sensuality to exist only as a voice. You write a tune, and if it’s on blast on the radio, you’re invisible and merely felt, like a virus, like an itch. You’re finally a feeling, something that gets through, that vibrates in someone else’s body. You can choose to be just a hum in the streets, or to become a weapon of subversion – how many times have I been told, I’m not sure I like everything about you, but I love your song? Then, what if the song became the most-sure way of making love, without useless taboos and misconceptions?

 

For me, the whole idea of the video is to twist the terrible ending of Ophelia, as a myth, an idea. In Hamlet, Ophelia is, of course, the unlucky lover, the rejected one; but her madness and the suicide that ensues is also symptomatic of a whole era: the young girl, unwanted, unloved, simply cannot live. She’s doomed, she disappears, and she melts with nature.

 

Insanity is also really interesting in this play, for it is the sign of a mind deranged by rejection as if she couldn’t remain in the world after being unwanted by Hamlet.

 

The choreography uses the idea of unrequited love, like in the song’s lyrics, but since it’s Krump, we can add dark humor to it, cartoonish vibes if we want.

 

Krump is perfect to me because it’s wild, sometimes with the childish energy of mime, sometimes with the pure stamina of jabs, and it can tell all the nuances of crazy love, use darkness as something contagious. Ophelia, raised from the water, battles furiously with it, and the original painting is suddenly shattered by a powerful feminine figure who finds another way to be unforgettable.”

 

Chris and its acclaimed songs can be found in multiple year-end lists and was named Album of the Year by The Guardian, The Independent, iPaper, Evening Standard and Clash Magazine; the record’s lead single Girlfriend was Track Of The Year in Time Magazine, Dazed and MOJO. It was also featured by, amongst others, The Sunday Times, Daily Telegraph, The Observer, Q, Uncut, Pitchfork, Noisey, The FADER, Crack & The Line of Best Fit.

 

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A Choir Of Ghosts - Southwest of the Moon

A Choir Of Ghosts

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Choir Of Ghosts - Southwest of the Moon

A Choir Of Ghosts – Southwest of the Moon

 

 

 

 

 

Artist – A Choir Of Ghosts

 

Song Title – Southwest of the Moon

 

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Having grown through the soil that is the reminiscence of Kurt Cobain, topped with water, sun, and air of Tallest Man On Earth and Hollow Coves, A Choir Of Ghosts new single gives you all shades of nostalgia in the single “Southwest of the Moon.”

 

The single is inspired by a painting displayed in his childhood home and naturally developed into a reflection of past relationships and friendships.

 

It resonates how we can break relationships when asking for too much, giving too little and being silent when being mistreated, in hope of you will “come back home”.

 

“Southwest of The Moon” is a letter of apology, both to himself to be stronger and an asking of forgiveness for the people that have got hurt.

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Tell us your names, country of birth and childhood experience.

James Auger, born in England and grew up in a small fishing village on the northeast coast of England.

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State your academic qualification.

I studied Music Technology.

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Elaborate on your music career, band name, experience, and skills.

My music career started when I was 12, like every other aspiring musician playing in my friend’s garage and playing way too loud.

 

I started playing more folk/pop music when I became 20. A Choir of Ghosts is an accumulation of all of my old bands that are now dead and buried but have helped create the musician I am today.

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Tell us your genre and idea behind your music video or song.

I guess my genre would be classed as folk-pop. The idea behind Southwest of the Moon is basically an apology to people I’ve hurt in the past, people who I don’t have contact with anymore for whatever reason.

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Tell us how to run a record label based on your experience as an artist.

If I were to run a record; I would want to be as involved as possible, but I won’t try and force my ideas on the artist. I would always try and be available if artists have questions or worries.

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Tell us how you are promoting your music.

I am signed to Greywood Records in Germany and they are promoting my music.

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State the names of other members of your band, music producer, crew or music video director.

The members of my band change a lot, we’re a musical collective. I have members from both Sweden and Canada.

 

My music producer is a guy from Napanee, Ontario called Terry Benn; I’ve been working with him for the last three years.

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Tell us how long you have been in the music business, your experience, and your future goal.

I’ve been playing music since I was a child, but only in the past three years have I started touring extensively in Europe.

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Tell us what makes you unique from others.

In a way, I’m not unique at all. I’m just another guy with a beard playing acoustic guitar and singing about love.

 

But what sets me apart, and what sets everyone else apart is the music itself. The experiences and stories leading up to the creation of the song are unique to everyone.

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List your five favourite songs including the artists.

Yekteniya 1 – Batushka

 

I Was Just Thinking – Teitur

 

Sheets – Damien Jurado

 

The Art of American Football – Funeral For a Friend

 

The Science of Selling Yourself Short – Less Than Jake

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Tell us your position on “Do It Yourself” and signing to a major label.

Well, there’s a big difference. Promotion is obviously a lot easier if you’re signed to a major label, but at the same time, there is a lot more artistic freedom if you’re just doing it yourself.

 

I have a couple of friends that have signed major deals and sometimes it doesn’t go that well because they have so many artists and they don’t get the attention they deserve or need to prosper.

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Tell us other activities you are pursuing apart from music.

I am planning on studying to become a teacher actually.

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State your artist’s name and elaborate on it.

A Choir of Ghosts is all the bands I have been in previously and that those bands and projects have shaped the musician I am. The ghosts are those bands – the choir is all of them put together.

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State the title of the song and the meaning.

‘Southwest of The Moon’ comes from a painting at my mother’s house, an old tapestry style painting and on it, it says that something lies southwest of the moon, and I thought it sounded beautiful.

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State the title of the album and the reason for choosing the title.

The album is going to be called “Ounce of Gold”. It’s the title track of the album, and a song I wrote when I was 18.

 

It is about trying to weigh up the difference in happiness and money.

 

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Quarry - Super Arcade

Quarry – Super Arcade

 

 

 

 

 

 

Quarry - Super Arcade

Quarry – Super Arcade

 

 

 

 

 

 

Artist Name – Quarry

 

Song Title – Super Arcade

 

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Vittorio Tolomeo, also known as Quarry, is an indie pop rock singer-songwriter based in London.

 

Bilingual in English and Italian, tireless musical explorer, he’s been playing all around Europe, solo and with some bands and, as a producer, he’s exploring new territories such as electronic and ambient.

 

Some of his most notable works include the album “Prize Day”, released by former president of Island Records Marshall Blonstein through his label Audio Fidelity, which got a lot of airplay in many countries, and the single “Aria” that was theme music for “Demo”, a popular radio show aired on Italian public broadcasting RAI.

 

He then founded the band Prizeday. Their debut album “Apps Will Grow Like Feathers” was released through New Zealand’s Do It Records.

 

They toured across Europe performing at The Great Escape Festival and also opening some shows for The Crazy World Of Arthur Brown.

 

Their short film “War Zone”, including five songs of the album, shot in Portugal to accompany the band’s debut album, was showcased to the world’s media at Cannes Film Festival in 2014.

 

“Vittorio’s new album “Prize Day” is as expressive and colorful as the artist that created the music and the lyrics.

 

He is a one of a kind artist, and we’re thrilled to be working with him.”

– Marshall Blonstein, president of Morada Records/Audio Fidelity

 

“The qualities that define Vittorio Tolomeo are the same qualities that define his music. He is an intensely spiritual guy, an intensely nice guy, and these aspects of character shine through each and every song.”

– Bruce Replogle, Rock Management USA

 

“Not only can Prizeday write some great catchy tunes they also have an image and style that sets them apart from the rest”.

– Paul Marshall, director of Do It Records

 

More!

Songs recorded in an arcade game room. All-around musical handyman, and occasional pinball wizard, Quarry releases his new album.

 

A warehouse filled with old pinball machines and arcade games where a musician installed a recording studio and threw himself into writing songs and running sound experiments. That’s how “Super Arcade” was conceived – A very special environment to make a very special record.

 

This place inspired the title and set the mood for the new album of the London-based indie-rock singer-songwriter and multi-instrumentalist Vittorio Tolomeo, also known as Quarry now.

 

“For a musician, a place to make music is a continuous journey in unexplored galaxies, it’s freedom, it’s shelter,” explains Quarry.

 

“Making the record in such a strange place was necessary to stop time and detach me from the unnecessary things of this age.

 

I realized that I wanted to express the value of awkwardness. When I think about the invasion of bloggers of nothingness, talent shows, false myths, and ephemeral notoriety, I get comfortable with being out of place and out of time.”

 

On this album, tracks like “Everything And Its Opposite” and the titular cut create a surreal picture of digital monopolies and their algorithms which influence every aspect of our existence, while “Haters Online” and “Firefighter” target social media and the border between virtual and real.

 

Elsewhere, “Man With The Scars” pays tribute to David Bowie, and the visionary ballad “Sweet Alien On Creamy Skis” celebrates those who still believe in a (real) turning point on the road to peace on the planet.

 

But no matter how heavy or sarcastic a subject is, the music is infectious throughout, combining slashing guitars, distorted bass lines and steady beat with melodic hooks, because Quarry is a firm believer that a right 3-minute song can change someone’s life, and you can’t go wrong with an alternative pop-rock confection, if it’s deliciously dirty and punchy.

 

On most of the “Super Arcade” numbers, Quarry played all the instruments, but he’s going to return to the stage to perform with his band in various European venues in the spring and in America in the summer…

 

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