Broadtube Music Mag Book - Volume 19

Music Mag Book 19

Broadtube Music Mag Book – Volume 1

Broadtube Music Mag Book - Volume 19

Broadtube Music Mag Book – Volume 19

 

Broadtube Music Magazine features various thought-provoking interviews with gifted artists across the globe. BMM is a platform to discover new music and get along with new artists.

Featured artists are Moonlight Social, Lizzie Blazquez, Studeo, Amber, Georgie Femme, Taylor-Louise, ClipKingz, John Michael Hersey, Binary Drift, Seth Hilary Jackson, and Icicle.

 

 

 

 

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Mobile Version

Athamirra – I Can Tell

 

 

 

 

 

 

Athamirra – I Can Tell

 

 

 

 

 

ARTIST NAME: Athamirra

 

Lyricist: Robyn Rees

 

Label: Athamirra Music

 

Produce: Supreme Tracks

 

SONG TITLE: I Can Tell

 

GENRE: Country

 

Robyn Rees – Facebook

 

Athamirra – Facebook

 

Website

 

New Zealand lyrics and songs that find calm in a rude world dealing with issues of life and love with thoughtfulness, depth and soul for mellow, easy listening and emotional undertones. – The spiritual philosophy of relationships with self and society.

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Tell us how you build up the tune for this song.

The tune comes from how the words are arranged. There is an inherent rhythm in the lyric of the song. The melody naturally progresses from this rhythm and the mood that is wanted to express these words. As a lyricist, I wrote the words so that a song can be naturally produced.

 

The next step is to give the producer Supreme Tracks a lyric file, a vocal scratch of my own song rendition and a reference track.

 

The reference track for this song is Neil Young’s “Harvest Moon”.

 

This is a mellow and amiable easy country reference track with harmonica.

 

So the excellent musicians that perform this rendition of “I Can Tell” belong to the Supreme Tracks team and are anonymous to me.

 

This changes the focus of artistry/creativity to the foundation of a great song – the lyric. Well-crafted lyrics inspire and generate music that works.

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Tell us the best means of becoming a famous artist and selling more records.

No idea really – I just started in 2016 and am constantly learning every step of the way. Not really interested in being famous but I do need income to keep bringing new material into the industry. I am currently advertising my website where anyone can listen for free or donate to different songs each week.

 

Any income I can generate with my songs flows right through to the musicians at Supreme Tracks as well when I get a new song produced so it is a marvellous recognition and encouragement of real talent.

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Tell us how fans are reacting to your music.

‘I Can Tell’ is playing on Radio Airplay and new fans are popping up regularly – one comment was “I love it! Catchy.”

 

I have been running ad campaigns on Facebook this year with excellent feedback and an increasing number of return visits to the website.

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Explain how to deal with fear.

No stage – no problem.

 

When I started in 2016 I put lyric videos of vocal scratches of my renditions of songs and this was incredibly scary for me to do because I am not a performing singer.

 

It was an excellent way to overcome the barrier of fear of exposure to the public of very personal issues and expression.

 

It paved the way to the next step of presenting my stuff to producers for better quality demos. This increased my confidence in my lyrics.

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Tell us your point of view on the quality of production of today’s songs to old songs and point out what you think has changed.

It depends on the genre and the purpose of the music. Many concerts and performances are a whole package deal that people enjoy for the atmosphere and lots of reasons apart from the music. Radio-friendly songs fill in a different environment and offer a different example.

 

Music is such a personal language I can only judge the production of songs that suit me. My taste runs to songs I can sing to and has music that resonates with my own emotions. So need melody and meaning that I haven’t found a lot of in today’s music. This just adds to my motivation to present my own stuff.

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Tell us an interesting experience in your music career that is significant.

In the short time that I’ve been in the music scene, I started in 2016; I have had conversations with three separate publishing and recording outfits interested in my music. This in itself is incredible. But what is interesting is that so far I have had no offer that fits my role as a lyricist/songwriter. The assumption is that the song is from a performing/recording artist. The significance is that brands that I have come across are about promoting personas rather than the actual music.

 

I feel that this discourages diversity and real talent because material success then depends on a mass marketing machine irrespective of whether the music is any good.  It should be about the song because a good song is a song that connects and involves the listener in a very personal way.

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Tell us how you come across the lyrics of this song.

I was driving home from having radiation for cancer and I had to keep stopping on the way in a text conversation that roughly turned into the first few lines of this song.

 

It made me think about how important communication is to how we cope and to how we come to understand ourselves.

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Tell us your best means of expressing yourself.

The written word is my comfort zone and I love to sing.

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Tell us your opinion on using music to deliberate on issues affecting people like corruption, immoralities, politics and religion.

I have songs on most of these issues. These issues are extremely important and should be discussed and exposed.

 

Music is such a universal language of connection that it is the ideal medium to encourage people to think deeply about these issues.

 

Music can balance rational thought with primal feeling. This balance is vital when deliberating this type of issues.

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Discuss how you plan to create a piece of timeless music that your fans can cherish forever.

Carry on doing what I am doing in the faith that it is the best way to be me. Everything has its time.

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List the names of individuals you can point out as legends and state your reasons.

I don’t have such a list. My appreciation has always been about the song itself and the music. My tastes spread across many genres and many individuals. I remember the songs and music that touched me in a deep and meaningful way.

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Tell us your viewpoint on discriminating.

To discriminate is to separate out according to particular qualities. In this definition, discrimination is neutral.

 

So to be discriminating can be a positive attitude. For example, to define behaviour as moral or immoral is to discriminate. It is a form of judgement that can be helpful. After all, it is better to be moral than immoral.

 

The problem is when discriminating is used negatively, usually from an attitude of arrogance.

 

Discrimination in today’s climate has become harmful to good judgement. This type of discrimination goes against the patience and tolerance we desperately need for peace.

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Tell us your favourite book and state your reason.

Like legends, I don’t really do favourites. I have read broadly and widely across many categories. I find I end up reading what is appropriate to my needs at the time.

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Tell us what triggers your creativity.

Daydreaming about life and living, people and nature, and how it all fits together.

 

Sometimes it is a memory or maybe someone will say something or I see something happen that I can empathise with or I feel confused about will start a daydream.

 

My skills are improving with practice and so I find myself responding more to other issues.

 

My latest, “Colour of Rain”, is about the horrendous crimes of sexual abuse against our children that I wrote after watching a TV documentary about Michael Jackson and boys.

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Tell us how you generate musical ideas for your composition.

When I sing the song I already have a melody that is my personal expression.

 

If the song is good enough for production, as I sing I have a background dialogue with me and myself about what kind of instruments would express the mood of the song and what other types of rhythm might work.

 

If a singer comes to mind then this is a starting point for looking for a reference track.

 

I tend to look at older music to bring into the present in the hope of blending the old with the new.

 

Maybe the result might be timeless. For “I Can Tell” the reference track was Neil Young’s “Harvest Moon” because of the mood and harmonica.

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Tell us your greatest song and state your reason.

Yeah – this is like legend and favourite. Each song has been important to me at the time it was created. I can only hope that others are touched too.

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Tell us how you compose your song.

Once the words are there and the main point or meaning is clear in my mind it is a natural progression to make sure the words can be sung with an engaging melody.

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Elaborate on the song.

Comes a point when the song needs to speak for itself and give the listener room to engage. A listener could engage on 3 levels – a fun singalong, how it is good to talk or go a bit deeper.

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Elaborate on your artist name and the title of the album.

Athamirra comes from “at the mirror”. What is important to us is often a reflection of who we are or what state we are in at the time. So Athamirra Music wants to honour our connections in a meaningful way.

 

‘I Can Tell’ is presented as a single. My website has a list playing over a number of weeks that I intend to compile into an album on a customized USB at some stage. ‘I Can Tell’ would be in an album yet to come.

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Share your press release and review with us.

I Can Tell

 

Press Release

Anyone who has been alone or lonely – which is everybody at some time or another – can relate to this song.

 

‘I Can Tell’ speaks to those difficult, out of control and hard to understand situations.

 

It shows how communication and expression release the tensions that keep us stuck in a helpless loop.

 

This music is a mellow, easy and intimate dance with confident emotion.

 

A great singalong to remind us that understanding ourselves and others in tough times gives us the confidence to get through better than ever.

 

Mobile Version

Marc Ambrosia – I Believe in Destiny

Marc Ambrosia – I Believe in Destiny

 

Marc Ambrosia – I Believe in Destiny

Marc Ambrosia – I Believe in Destiny

 

ARTIST NAME: Marc Ambrosia

 

SONG TITLE: I Believe in Destiny

 

ALBUM TITLE: Unleashed

 

RELEASE DATE: May 17, 2019

 

GENRE: Pop

 

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Apple Music

 

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CD Baby

 

Bandcamp

 

Website

 

Amazon

 

With emotions that run deep and inspiration that soars high, Marc Ambrosia is the singer/songwriter of our time.

 

At just 24 years old, Ambrosia already has an EP and a self-produced full-length album to his credit.

 

Currently, Marc is preparing to release his second studio album, Unleashed on May 17, 2019.

 

“It’s by no stretch of the imagination that this is the best stuff I’ve ever done,” says Ambrosia, “I finally feel as though I’m writing the songs I had always dreamed I’d write one day. I remember being a little kid with aspirations of becoming an artist. I feel as though that little kid is finally getting his wish now.”

 

Able to cut deep with lyrics and captivate with soul, Ambrosia is proving he’s pop music’s best-kept secret. In an industry that focuses on tabloid rather than artistry, Ambrosia is committed to taking the high road.

 

“It’s always disheartening to hear a kid say they want to make music and become a star,” Ambrosia explains, “For me, it’s never once been about hoping to take the world by storm and become superstar famous. It’s always been first and foremost about telling beautiful stories and making great art.”

 

With his latest material, Ambrosia is doing all that and more. While songs like “Let Me Be Your Secret” and “World with You” are filled with angst and longing; songs like “One Step Back” and “Bleed” are consumed by the need to let go. All of Marc’s songs have one thing in common though; they are drenched in romanticism and are designed to heal the broken hearted.

 

“I write songs to bring people together,” Ambrosia says, “We’ve all gone through similar pain and we all long for similar joy. The truth of a song is what people latch onto more than anything else and I consider my songs to be honest little pieces of my heart.”

 

Yes, for Marc Ambrosia it’s all about heart; and with each new song lies an invitation to take a closer look, and most importantly, find a home in his.

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Discuss your existence. 

Honestly, I feel like I’m a person who just can’t wait to really exist in the world. Until my songs are heard by the masses, I’ll always just be a shell of who I see myself as and who I want to be. The key to existing is to be heard.

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State your favourite genre of music and your reason.

One of my first musical loves was disco. Disco is still my go-to for a pick me up. When I first heard disco, I found out that I had rhythm in my body and in my voice. Disco helped both rise to the top quickly. Disco makes me dance like no one is watching. Life is too short not to dance badly.

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State your experience as a musician. 

I grew up singing the blues, old school, soul/R&B, and gospel. That’s the underlying influence in all my songs really.

 

As a kid, I sang in the Baptist church. Before I knew it, I was traveling to different churches within the Tri-State area to sing.

 

A few years down the road, I joined a cover band, which I quit two years later when I teamed up with a musician by the name of Shane Rojas. Shane and I formed a duo and together, we wrote and performed our asses off for about five years. Those were our formative years really, as songwriters.

 

From there, I splintered off and started recording my own records. Since then, there’s no music I’d rather be making than the music I’m making right now.

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Tell us the themes of your songs.

This record “Unleashed” covers so much ground; from the feeling of initial attraction, being afraid by the fragility of love, wanting someone to love you back who simply won’t, incessant loneliness, the bitterness and anger of unrequited love, the sorrow and pain of love that died too soon, meaningless hook-ups, the longing for something real, something that lasts. I’ve been to all those places and I’m not the only one.

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Name the people behind your success and thank them on this platform.

My highest gratitude to the wonderful musicians who played on Unleashed – Chris D’Antonio, Eric Raible, Eric Walton, Jahson Saunders, Todd Pritchard, Shane Rojas, Kyle Abramov.

 

My ace of spades assistant, Ali Delacorza – I love you and I am so thankful for everything you do for me.

 

My lovely family and friends – thanks for always being there!

 

Jamie Myerson – you taught me how to make records, that’s one of the greatest gifts I’ve ever been given!

 

Finally, to my listeners – you make me proud to be an artist and everything I do, I do for you.

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State your future goals. 

You know, I’m not consumed by the need to be a star, but I do want my songs to be famous, I do. Whatever it takes to get my work heard is what it takes. That’s my biggest goal – If one day, I can be financially comfortable making records and touring around the world, I will have achieved a great feat.

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Share your press release and reviews with us.

‘Unleashed’ captures Marc Ambrosia cutting deep with emotionally compelling lyrics and captivating with his signature vocal soul prowess.

 

The songs on Unleashed speak to understanding the pain of unrequited love and rising above it.

 

Simultaneously, Unleashed also stands to embrace both the fragility and the fascination with falling in love.

 

Reviews:

“Very well-produced, radio-friendly material. I especially enjoy the more rocking nature of songs like “I Believe in Destiny” and “Bleed” — Kurt Vile-like vibes. Nice synth implementation there.”

– Mike Mineo, Obscure Sound

 

“A most personal of recordings, that much is perceptible from the get-go. Well produced it is too, filled with electro noise and hidden mystical qualities.”

 – MP3Hugger

 

“Marc Ambrosia’s lyrics teeter between intimacy and accessibility. His hooks are fantastic, the melodies featured throughout have you hanging on every word almost like it’s gospel, and because of his incredible songwriting power, it’s very easy to find yourself completely swept away by the songs, their messages, and their emotion.”

 – Rebecca Cullen, Exposed Vocals Magazine

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Elaborate on how you think your music is inspiring your fans.

I’d like to think that my songs inspire people to take a chance on themselves, take a chance on love, take a chance on whatever you want to do in life and chase whatever feels right. A lot of songs on this record speak to that.

 

Take a song like “Painting the Shape of My Heart,” for example; that’s a song that talks about life before falling in love just feeling empty and then all of a sudden, love struck and it felt right and once you find something so right, you never want to go back in time again, you only want to forge ahead.

 

A song like “World with You” goes hand in hand with that as well. Life is all about the adventure, not just where you go, but who you go with, so take a deep breath, and go explore.

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Analyze the transformations you have discovered so far in the music industry.

Both in music and beyond, we as a society are trying to be as forward moving as possible, while still longing for some sense of nostalgia.

 

Who would’ve thought we’d be living in a world where music is being listened to on tiny little iPhone speakers and yet, in the same breath, vinyl is making a comeback?

 

Trends in the music itself are hearkening back to the seventies and eighties constantly, yet we’re finding new technological ways to manipulate that sound rather than resorting to old techniques of producing that sound organically.

 

We want the most beautiful future possible and we also want to take with us our favourite parts of the past. That’s a beautiful thing.

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State the artists you cherish most and your reason.

Lindsey Buckingham: For his ferocity and commitment to taking artistic risks.

 

Christine McVie: For her steadfast ability to churn out the most perfect pop songs.

 

Bill Withers: For making timeless music and doing it simply.

 

Patti Smith: For the way she lives each day according to her artistic muse.

 

Emily Saliers: For being so open in her writing.

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Elaborate on how you develop your lyrics.

Sometimes lines just come to me; sometimes somebody says something that just sets off a spark in my songwriter mind. It never happens the same way twice. I write every day, that keeps your chops in good shape.

 

I may not write a full song every day, but I’m writing down lines, chunks of songs, or just simple ideas every day.

 

Once upon a time, I was writing 40 or some odd songs a year, but only 10 or 15 were actually good. I’m at a point now, where I may only write 10-20 songs a year, but they all come out really good. It took a long time to come to this point. I just try and be as honest as possible when I write. I never write songs with meaningless lyrics.

 

In many cases, I’m writing autobiographically about my own experiences, there are times though where I’m channeling someone else who perhaps experienced something and told me about it; then later, I ended up feeling it was worth writing about. That’s not the case with “Unleashed” though, all of these songs are totally written in relation to my own life.

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Tell us if you enjoy collaborating with other artists or just singing as a solo artist.

As much as I like to call the shots on my records and my concerts and my career, I certainly do love the chance to collaborate. When I do collaborate, I choose wisely. I happily admit I’m a total harmony whore. I love anyone who I can harmonize really well with.

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Brief us with your opinion on making music that makes people want to dance or making the music with a genuine message that inspires them.

The greatest songs do both at the same time.

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Explain copyright.

Copyright is very important. As writers and recording artists, we are constantly curating new intellectual property.

 

Copyright certifies and protects that intellectual property, while also safeguarding it from infringement.

 

If you write songs or record songs, file for copyright. You can do so right online and it is so easy!

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Discuss the impact of a Performance Rights Organization.

Where copyright helps protect your intellectual property, a Performance Rights Organization helps you get paid for it!

 

If you’ve got songs being played around the world on radio, songs being synced in movies or TV, you’ve got a paycheck coming to you and a PRO helps that get to you.

 

I’ve been a proud member of BMI for five years now and I launched my own publishing company, Roon Boon Songs with them.

 

As a result, for anything I publish under my company, BMI will collect the money it generates and send me payments.

 

BMI is my PRO of choice and I love them. ASCAP and SESAC are two other giant PROs.

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Elaborate on how you develop your melody and instrumentation.

Sitting down at the piano and finding a melody I like and can write to is my favourite.

 

When magic strikes, it strikes. One of my favourite memories is when I wrote the music for “One Step Back.” Originally, I had drafted a melody with Eric Raible for the song. I liked it at first, but then the more I’d be working on the song, I’d start to hate the music we had for it. This spawned Jamie Myerson and I creating about nine different versions of it to choose from.

 

I went home after a long day in the studio and listened back to all nine versions and hated each one.

 

I was totally defeated and thought that perhaps the song wouldn’t make the record, and then I sat down at the piano. Within five minutes, I came up with a melody for the song that I absolutely loved. I went to Jamie the next day and played it for him. We knew we had found the song at that point and it was all going to work out.

 

I also do a lot of demoing in GarageBand on my iPad. Right now in GarageBand, I’m working on about seven or ten songs for my next album, it sounds like it’s going to be a funky little record.

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Go into detail on the recording of this song.

I wrote “I Believe in Destiny” in 2016 while vacationing in the Poconos for my 21st birthday.

 

I got up one night at 3 AM, drank a bottle of wine and cranked out the song.

 

A few months later, I brought the lyrics to Chris D’Antonio of the Wayside Shakeup. Together, we wrote the music for it.

 

Truth be told, I wasn’t sure the demo was strong enough and I thought perhaps the song might get dropped early on. When I brought all of my demos to Jamie Myerson and we were going to start making this record, Jamie immediately loved it.

 

As a result, the very first song we worked on for “Unleashed” was “I Believe in Destiny.” It didn’t take long for us to really get caught up in the spirit of the song. I had this idea to incorporate some Himalayan type vocal improvisation. Jamie set up a mic for me in the live room and let me go at it. I remember wailing my ass off and watching Jamie on the other side of the glass just totally losing his shit over how good everything sounded. That was a fun moment and I think at that moment, we both really started believing in the destiny of this record.

 

A few weeks later, Todd Pritchard would visit us from L.A. and record the guitar tracks for the song, another stroke of destined magic, indeed.

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Discuss your music performance.

When I take to the stage, I make sure my band and I are sonic and tight.

 

The key to a great performance is to have the right balance of slick precision and also, spontaneity. You want to get to a point where you are well rehearsed, but it doesn’t come off as super put together. You want to have a tight, put together set that comes off as loose and effortless to the audience.

 

Once I get the setlist finalized and we commit to it, the more we play it, the more relaxed we become with it. Muscle memory kicks in more or less and you’re able to get out of your head and let your heart and soul take over carrying the performance.

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State your artist’s name and elaborate on it.

Before I started recording as a solo artist, I toyed with the idea of establishing a stage name. Somewhere along the way, the idea lost momentum and I just went with my birth name.

 

Funny thing is, when I first met Jamie Myerson, he thought Marc Ambrosia was a stage name! That was all the confirmation I needed, no stage name would be necessary…

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State the title of the song and the meaning.

“I Believe in Destiny” is really a song about commitment, taking a chance on love, and having faith that it will prevail through better or worse.

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State the title of the album and the reason for choosing the title. 

I decided to call this record “Unleashed,” because I truly did unleash a part of myself that I hadn’t before as a writer. Never before have I been so open about my love life (or most times, lack thereof).

 

This is a record for the hopeless romantics like me, the effervescent lovers of the world, the suffering broken-hearted; these songs are the soundtrack to that.

 

This record is me unleashing that for all to hear. We’ve all been there. My most sincere wish is that whoever needs to hear this record gets the chance to, and while they do, I hope they feel that they are not alone.

 

Mobile Version