R3HAB – Don’t Give Up On Me Now

 

 

 

 

 

 


R3HAB + Julie Bergan – Don’t Give Up On Me Now

 

 

 

 

 

DJ and producer R3HAB teams up with the skilled singer to drop an amazing song entitled ‘Don’t Give Up On Me Now’ with a fascinating video that will cajole the audience.

 

The song is memorable and one can feel the virtue in the vocal of this great singer.

 

Julie sings from the heart with her raw vocal.

 

The video is well-produced and pictures are sharp.

 

Colour grading is outstanding, and the lighting is appropriate.

 

Scenes are rich of beautiful backgrounds.

 

The video is simple and dramatic.

 

Song is catchy and the delivery of words is noteworthy.

 

The instrumentation is entertaining.

 

R3HAB

DJ and producer R3HAB continues to take electronic music to a higher level with his groundbreaking production.

 

He was being ranked the #12 DJ in the world by DJ Mag.

 

A globetrotting talent hailed by the likes of Forbes and Billboard Magazine as one of the most iconic electronic DJs and music makers, Fadil El Ghoul has spent the last seven years garnering hundreds of millions of streams while charging ahead on the international club circuit, all without a record label to lean on.

 

R3HAB’s debut album TROUBLE marked a breakthrough for the Dutch native upon its release in the fall of 2017.

 

The LP has garnered over five hundred million streams to date. Singles “I Just Can’t”, “Trouble” and “Icarus” attracted global attention and coverage upon their release and serve as a confirmation of R3HAB’s competence to take up a more elegant, pop-driven sound, while retaining his quintessential Dutch roots.

 

With his second full-length studio collection, “The Wave”, R3HAB continues to push the boundaries of dance music.

 

The collection has racked up over three hundred and fifty million streams and counting, with tracks “Rumors”, “Ain’t That Why”, “Hold On Tight”, “The Wave”, and “Lullaby” all shooting into the Billboard top 100 dance/electronic charts.

 

His album continues to assure fans that R3HAB can conquer any electronic genre as he continues to cement himself as one of the most successful independent artists in the world.

 

Julie Bergan

Julie Bergan has justified herself to be one of the greatest live acts in Norway.

 

With her energetic personality, powerful vocals, and explosive performance style, she blasts your assumptions into outer space.

 

Bergan struck a multi-year deal with Warner Music Norway straight after completing high school and has worked hard since then to achieve her goals.

 

So far the brilliant star has garnered over three hundred and twenty million streams on Spotify, with several of her tracks reaching platinum status (Guilt Trip, Blackout, Incapable, Arigato).

 

In February 2018, she dropped her 2x platinum debut album Turn On The Lights.

 

Bergan has performed all over the world, having support shows for Justin Bieber, Dua Lipa and Alan Walker.

 

She performed the 100m global smash Ignite at world stages like Coachella and EDC Japan with Alan Walker.

 

Julie got nominated for Spellemann (Norwegian Grammy) for ‘Song of the year’, picked up ‘Breakthrough artist of the year’ from the Norwegian songwriting association for Arigato, headlined multiple Norwegian festivals, and toured Norway to sold out venues with both the ‘Arigato Tour’ and the ‘It’s LIT Tour – Part 1 and 2.’

 

Julie Bergan is a genius to check out.

 

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Mobile Version

Witold Suryn – Dancers in the Village

 

 

 

 

 

 

Witold Suryn – Dancers in the Village

 

 

 

 

 

ARTIST NAME: Witold Suryn

 

SONG TITLE: Dancers in the Village

 

ALBUM TITLE: Falcimore

 

GENRE: Symphonic, Orchestral, Contemporary Music.

 

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Witold Suryn is a Canadian composer, pianist, bassist, and music producer.

 

Formally educated in music (piano) he composes music for over 40 years, first in jazz, then in contemporary symphonic and movie scores genre.

 

In addition to his formal musical education and years of composition practice in classical music, he gathered considerable experience in movie scoring for the contemporary film industry.

 

In his work, he cooperated with several young North American and British directors scoring their short and mid-length productions.

 

Independently he continuously composes music for cinema or TV productions, releases albums in symphonic, jazz and recently in electronic genres.

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Discuss how you develop your melody.

The melody comes from a story or an image, sometimes real ones like a painting or a movie, or just imagined.

 

Quite often the story and music begin at the same time and evolve in parallel. It is like painting music. But first and foremost I have to hear this music in my head. If there is nothing, what comes to a partition is just worthless bunch of notes.

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Tell us your source of inspiration.

Always imagination.

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Tell us the most memorable experience in your music career.

Many years ago I was contacted by a young American director with a proposition to write a score for his short movie I was faced by an interesting challenge: a 21-st century black-and-white, very well-tailored tragedy with no dialogs, sound or subtitles. Even the actors did not say a word.

 

On one hand, I had absolute freedom to compose what I felt, on the other, I felt the weight of responsibility knowing that music may uplift as well as destroy the intents of the movie creator.

 

I watched the film many times searching on the piano what would resonate with it before I put the first note on the partition.

 

But, once I began I composed the score within days, made a decent mock-up and sent it to the director. And he liked it as it was. I did not have to change a note. It never happened again.

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Discuss how you build your song.

Being a piano player with formal musical education I use it as a tool, not as a set of rigid rules. So the music builds itself as I hear it, no matter whether it builds following the craft rules or against them.

 

My composition process follows what I hear, sometimes I have a complete vision of what I will write, and sometimes it resembles building the stairs when I figure out what the next step will be just before finishing the actual one. But one thing remains constant, the need for telling the story. Without it, my music would have no soul.

 

Being of an old school I use notes, partitions, and piano as a basic set of tools, but to create the sound I use notation software, many different instrument libraries and later in the process the mixing and mastering capabilities of my studio.

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Tell us how you ensure your music inspires others.

Ensure? I do not think anything like “ensure” exists, but probably every musician and composer tries to find ways to his/her listeners’ minds and hearts. My way is to transfer an image, a story, an emotion that would make the listener see what the music conveys and reflect on it.

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Discuss the relevance of promotion to the music business.

In the actual world of easy access to sound creation tools, almost everybody can be a creator, a composer, a musician. With this observation come the numbers with many zeros before a decimal point.

 

Hundreds of millions of potential musicians try to get their music to millions of potential listeners. Without promotion they will most probably stay forever in their garage studios, unknown, unheard, overlooked. And the listeners may never have the chance to discover a new Mozart, Borodin, Sting or Corea.

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Tell us what you will do apart from music.

I am a university professor. I teach and research software engineering.

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List the names of the instruments you can play.

Piano (classical acoustic instrument), synths, organs, and bass. If needed I can handle guitars, but it is only for recording purposes.

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Tell us if you have any music background.

10 years of music-school in piano class.

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Tell us the piece of advice you will give to a new artist on entering the music chart.

Actually, three pieces of advice.

Choose carefully your audience. Different people listen to hip-hop and different to symphonic music.

Be sure that you can create something meaningful for the audience you chose.

Make any effort required to find an effective promotion company. They will eventually push your music to the charts.

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Elaborate on melody and rhythm.

Interesting pair…melody and rhythm – While rhythm without melody can easily exist (like in drums solos), melody without rhythm would be difficult to follow, both in playing and listening to.

 

Also, the two have different means of conveying the message. The African tam-tams are able to make people move, no matter their origin or culture, while the melody without this “something” will pass unnoticed or will bore the listener.

 

So, composing, in fact, is finding a tune, a melody, this Beethovenian “da-da-da-da” that will make people stop and listen.

 

A melody or a leitmotif is a clue for music, be it rock, jazz or symphonic. If there are no lyrics to fill up space, the lack of melody kills the sounds.

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State your future goals.

Future goals are the same as the present ones: compose music and make it reach people. Make them like it, or hate it, but never bore them. And, if possible, have my music played by others.

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Share your recording experience with us.

I record all in my studio. If I write jazz scores all are practically live recorded, my instruments are directly connected to my DAW with no use of microphones, so at least one problem is avoided, the background noises.

 

I play most of the instruments and eventually add final drums later.

 

When I have other musicians participating; they either come to my studio and I am a recording engineer or I send the project and they record their parts with their DAWs and send me the material to be used in mixing.

 

When it comes to cinematic or symphonic scores the process is different – I write notes on staves, sometimes record them live, but still, the process resembles the classical composition with partition and pen, except partition resides in the notation software and mouse is a pen.

 

Once the composition is finished it goes to DAW where the recording takes place, i.e. MIDI data is sent to libraries and the resulting audio is recorded in situ.

 

Live recording, when there are no mics used, is relatively straight forward when the studio has a decent audio interface, powerful enough computer and proper DAW software.

 

Recording in loops, comping and some other smart technical tricks shorten the recording time but may make the mixing time considerably longer.

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Tell us the most difficult part of a recording.

As a recording engineer; it is listening to endless attempts to correctly record a phrase.

 

As a recording musician; it is fighting with my own errors and fatigue when the recorded material is musically and technically complex.

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Discuss the greatest mistake you have ever made in your music career.

I made more than a few mistakes in my music career, but none of them qualifies as “greatest.” I might have made one if a few decades ago I had decided to make my living out of music. It would change my love for music and freedom of creation into obligatory sellable good, or I could face starving (joke).

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Tell us how you build up your composition.

If by “build the composition” we mean the process from having a musical idea to having it released, it is almost a reflection of working with the real orchestra.

 

First, the composer works with the partition and a pen (i.e. notation software, mouse, keyboard and libraries).

 

When the composition is finished, the MIDI file goes to a DAW where MIDI material is being edited to sound like it is intended, a bit like giving parts to orchestra members and explaining to each of them what and how they are supposed to play.

 

Next step is “recording”, the MIDI is played by libraries like parts are played by musicians and audio material is created. From there the process of mixing and mastering begins.

 

On the other hand, if “building the composition” means the creation process, there are probably as many processes as there are composers.

 

My way of composing has several approaches and none of them actually goes strictly with a category of music I compose.

 

Sometimes it begins with a very clear idea of a basic leitmotif, which next is being orchestrated, put through variations, enhanced by sub-motifs branched from main ones until everything required is said.

 

Sometimes I hear harmonies that sound interesting, but no motifs for them yet, so I build harmony foundations and on top of them gradually add cues. And cues suggest new harmonies, and so on, so forth.

 

Another way of composing is building all at once but bar after bar. This requires, however, hearing this “all” completely in my head, so I know what instruments, when and what should play.

 

Composing jazz pieces quite often begins with playing “nothing”. No ideas, no cues, just exploring the keyboard, imagining the rhythm, hearing the bass. What is interesting in this approach it the concept unique for jazz, the concept of continuous composition, and if anything interesting happens in this process it transforms into “cue”, gets noted, played and recorded.

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Discuss the relevance of music.

Can we even imagine the world without music? Besides of giving unique pleasures, thrills, emotions, healing wounds and calming tempers, music has what no other medium has, the universal communication language.

 

I have heard beautiful jam sessions played by musicians who have never met before and who did not speak each other’s common language. But through music, they communicated like best and oldest friends. No other language can do it.

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Elaborate on the song.

The song usually has something to say, either through lyrics or through music – In very good songs through both.

 

As the music in our times has many different faces, a “song” is not necessarily being “sung”, but it is always played.

 

Famous Dutch groups like Ekseption or Focus had many songs with no lyrics or even a vocal, still making people listen to them again, and again… And there is rap, always having a lot to say but quite often not much to sing. And people listen to these songs with interest.

 

So, is the “song” a piece of sound that has to be “sung” or the acoustic wave of defined length and energy that has a purpose, the content and the message? In my opinion, THIS is the song.

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Elaborate on your artist name and the title of the album.

My artist name is my real name and I like it that way.

 

The album title, “Falcimore” is a name of a fictitious small town in Italy, close to the border with Switzerland. The whole suite of which “Dancers in the Village” make part tells the story of one day in this town, the market day.

 

Mobile Version

Michael Lane – Believe

 

 

 

 

 

 

Michael Lane – Believe

 

 

 

 

 

ARTIST NAME: Michael Lane

 

SONG TITLE:  Believe

 

ALBUM TITLE: Travelling Son

 

GENRE: Folk/Indie/Pop

 

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Tell us how to refine a demo to a mastered song.

As soon as I’m happy with the sound of my demo, I master it, and then it’s a mastered song. 🙂

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Discuss the processing involved in creating a song.

Capturing the mood, the story, and the right chords/rhythm is the processing I do in order to create a song.

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Elaborate on the themes of most of your songs.

The themes are always different because the stories are always different, so then the songs are always different.

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Tell us your greatest musical works up to date.

If you are referring to the greatest in terms of chart-topping success, it would have to be a song I wrote for my wife called Mrs. Lawless, and a cover of the song Angel.

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Tell us your future goals and how you aim to accomplish.

One of my future goals is to play gigs outside of Europe. Continuing to work in the music industry and make connections will be the key factor to make that happen.

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Tell us how you boost your performance.

Be authentic and real.

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Discuss how the instruments come together for a song.

Depending on the song I like to start with the guitar and go from there.

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State your musical skills.

I’m a good singer, ok guitar player, and a simple songwriter.

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Tell us how you eliminate noise in your recordings.

Don’t record when it’s noisy.

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List the name of artists you cherish most.

I cherish all of them equally.

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Tell us how you get inspiration.

From life.

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Elaborate on your artist name and the title of the album.

The artist name is my name, and the title of my upcoming album is the title of a song on the album that has a very personal meaning of events in my life.

 

Mobile Version

NICHOLAH – Out of the Pie

NICOLAH – Out of the Pie

 

 

 

 

 

 

NICOLAH – Out of the Pie

NICOLAH – Out of the Pie

 

 

 

 

 

NICOLAH – Out of the Pie

 

ARTIST NAME: NICOLAH

 

SONG TITLE:  Out of the Pie

 

RELEASE DATE: 10th May 2019

 

GENRE: Singer-Songwriter

 

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NICOLAH is a Cumbrian singer-songwriter based in London. She has just finished performing in a play; Section 28 and The Queer State directed by Kay Adshead at the Alexandra er Palace and she is now ready to share her next single, Out of the Pie.

 

Her music is a sum of fresh life experiences about faith, sexuality, culture… A unique and empathic world view built on a foundation of classic songwriting.

 

It blends pop sensibilities with an indie spirit. She shares similarities with early Katy Perry and her Christian pop roots, the sweet strum, and vocals of Joni Mitchell, and the stadium pumping energy of Coldplay’s anthemic choruses.

 

In the summer of 2018 she won the Open Category – Mayor of London GIGS Competition chosen by Judges Newton Faulkner, Lauren Churchman (BBC6music), Fuzz Chaudhrey (BBC Radio 1), Swarzy Macaly (KISS FM) and James Brister (ICMP).

 

After playing live for literally millions on London’s busy underground platforms, her first single ‘Flow’ won the 2016 Mayor of London GIGS Songwriting Prize sponsored by PRS for Music taking her to play Glastonbury 2017 alongside Everything Everything, Naughty Boy & Mullally. Since then she’s received support and multiple airplay from BBC introducing’s Tom Salmon, and in August 2018 recorded a live session for the show.

 

The previous release ‘Waiting on You’ invited listeners to be introspective: To see the power and completeness of themselves. It was featured on Hoxton radio show Get in Her Ears, Spotify playlist Talk About Pop Music and the music video was premiered by blog, She Makes Music.

 

Next release Out of the Pie is an elegant and bold mix of soaring melody and deep, dark thought-provoking lyrics like “…make up theories to survive…” Influenced by the emotional discord Nicolah has felt over the last 19 years, it will strike a chord with anyone feeling confused and divided right now.

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Tell us how you build up the tune for this song.

I wrote this song quite a while ago now, but from what I remember the melody for verse and chorus came out quite quickly. Once I got the structure clear in my head I finished off the lyrics and then spent a while in the rehearsal studio with my drummer and bass player working out the final arrangement.

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Tell us the best means of becoming a famous artist and selling more records.

I wish I knew. Whilst I try and figure out the answer to that question I’m focusing on writing and releasing new music and playing live.

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Tell us how fans are reacting to your music.

All my mum’s friends at church really love it! I think people can see what I’m putting out is real and seems to be resonating with people, particularly when I play live.

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Explain how to deal with fear on stage.

I’m still working on dealing with it; I start by imagining everyone’s naked! I think the most important thing is being prepared, plan your set, have an idea of what you need to say and how you’re going to say it and then play, play and play again.

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Tell us your point of view on the quality of production of today’s songs to old songs and point out what you think has changed.

I’m a bit conflicted about this. As much as the production of a song and writing is connected to a culture, a zeitgeist, I also feel older music has more substance. Just as you had to be more reliable before we had mobile phones.

 

Personally, I prefer the art of substance, no matter the production, lo-fi /hi-fi… mid-fi?! I’m a fan of artists like Kate Tempest, Stormzy and Four Tet as much as Joni Mitchell, Stevie Wonder, and Carole King.

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Tell us an interesting experience in your music career that is significant.

Interesting… I’ve been busking for the last 3 years on the London Underground, lots of interesting things happen there.

 

Once someone walked past covering their ears shouting “That sounds terrible” another time a homeless person came up stayed for a while dropped some coins from the little he had and said ‘Thank You’ which is so humbling.

 

So you never know what you’re going to get, that’s interesting – That the most beautiful thing about music it brings people together, and that’s special.

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Tell us how you come across the lyrics of this song.

Over the last few years, I’ve tried to push myself lyrically. One technique is to first look for different phonetic sounds to go with the melody. It’s good because it encourages me to be less conscious about the lyrics and often leads to more interesting lyrical destinations.

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Tell us your best means of expressing yourself.

I would say the best way of expressing oneself is being unafraid, to be honest, and show your raw self. What I know best is through writing a song and I’m learning how to expand my creativity visually. I’ve just started producing music videos and graphics to go along with my singles…

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Tell us your opinion on using music to deliberate on issues affecting people like corruption, immoralities, politics, and religion. 

I think the job of art, in general, is to comment, question, and make sense of the world. I believe it’s the music maker’s responsibility to do this, as much it is to provide escapism.

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Discuss how you plan to create a piece of timeless music that your fans can cherish forever. 

I plan to write the best songs possible, rich in melody and story. Production and sound changes, but melody and lyrics remain and ultimately that’s what matters to me.

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List the names of individuals you can point out as legends and state your reasons.

I love that quote, “…with great power comes great responsibility…” I think anyone that is: unafraid to be their unique themselves, that strives to be the best they can be, treats others with respect and utilizes love to conquer hate is a legend, famous or not.

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Tell us your viewpoint on discriminating.

Discrimination is wrong. But we don’t live in a perfect world so it happens all around the world in many different forms. And even the conscious of us discriminate subconsciously.  What’s important to me is to remain a good listener, to accept that I can unintentionally discriminate and to endeavor be better.

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Tell us your favourite books and state your reason. 

Ask me in a few years…I need to read more! As a songwriter, the dictionary and thesaurus are very useful. I’m a fan of biographical and factual books; they tend to be the books I can’t put down. I’m currently reading Michelle Obama’s ‘Becoming.’ And I’m trying to get into more fiction and poems. I’m open to recommendations…

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Tell us what triggers your creativity. 

I wish I truly knew exactly what it was. I know when I don’t play or write for a while, I miss it. And that often gives me an urge to get back and play again.

 

For me the trick is keeping it fresh, once I feel I’m repeating the same kind of melodies, chords, rhythms… I get bored.

 

I’ve noticed how my consumption of art and culture directly impacts how inspired I feel. I try to keep in mind the famous quote, I think it’s from the Dalai Lama:

“Take care of your Thoughts because they become Words. Take care of your Words because they will become Actions. Take care of your Actions because they will become Habits. Take care of your Habits because they will form your Character. Take care of your Character because it will form your Destiny, and your Destiny will be your Life.”

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Tell us how you generate musical ideas for your composition.

Most often I get this feeling that I want to write. It’s like a creative urge, a bit like the urge to go to the toilet but the desire is to pick up my guitar and write! This often happens when I get back from a holiday and I haven’t played much or I get bored playing covers when I’m busking and I just start jamming something out. From there, ideas build and I’m looking out for this kind of buzzy feeling I get when something feels right.

 

The last few years I’ve developed a kind of ‘ad lib’ style of writing where I allow and encourage myself to make different vocal sounds and this leads me along more interesting lyrical paths.

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Tell us your greatest song and state the reason.

My most significant song would be ‘Flow,’ It’s my fight song, to remind me to follow my heart and not give up. This song was my first single and the song that took me to play Glastonbury 2017.

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Tell us how you compose your song.

Generally, the music comes first, a chord progression or riff, the melody second then the lyrics start to fall into place.

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Elaborate on the song.

Out of the Pie, is a complex one. It’s a reflection on my life, of how I’ve felt over the last 19 years of my life. The emotional discord that has been playing in my heart, mind and the world I see around me. Its confusion, contradictions, loneliness, judgment…the list goes on!

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Elaborate on your artist name and the title of the album.

My name is my name, Nicola with an H on the end. The H is the first letter of my last name.

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Share your press release and review with us.

A motto for staying in your own lane.

 

Nicolah explains, “This song optimizes my journey of the last 19 years. The emotional discord that has been playing in my heart, mind and the world I see around me.”

 

Out of the Pie is a tongue in cheek banging anthem.  An elegant and bold mix of soaring melody & deep dark thought-provoking lyrics like “…make up theories to survive…”

 

The video, out 21st May 2019 is a collage of irony, juxtaposition, and illusions of life and death – Encouraging the listener to question and comment on life.

 

NICOLAH’s music built on a foundation of classic songwriting blends pop sensibilities with an indie spirit…

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