Bianca Bazin – White Water

 

ARTIST NAME: Bianca Bazin

 

SONG TITLE: White Water

 

GENRE: Alternative Pop

 

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UK folk singer turned pop songstress, Bianca Bazin is a new pop force and has been featured on BBC Introducing the South and Eagle Radio with further support for Bianca on publications like Vents Mag, Music Musings And Such, Purple Melon Magazine, Impose Magazine, The Most Radicalist, and On Record Magazine.

 

The music video for her single ‘Poor Thing’ was premiered on When The Horn Blows and is featured on the popular Spotify Playlist, Pop Trending which boasts almost 50 000 followers.

 

She has performed at numerous events across London, most noteworthy at the Mateus Tent at The Big Feastival (2018) which also saw performers Tom Odell, Craig David, and Paloma Faith.

 

Having attended dance school since the age of 4, the Guildford born (and currently based) Bianca Bazin grew up in a household filled with the arts.

 

At only 6 years old, she started playing the piano, furthering her love for music and dance.

 

As a teenager, she attended the Italia Conti Academy of Theatre Arts after which she began songwriting at London Music School in 2014.

 

A graduate of BA (Hons) Joint Honours in Economics and Spanish from Durham University, this multi-talented musician taught herself how to play the guitar and the ukulele.

 

Initially, Bianca Bazin performed folk music at several intimate events across the UK. She has since decided to move into the pop industry, stating, “due to the desire to explore new sounds and ideas, I wanted to make music which would be more uplifting.”

 

Writing all of her own music, her songwriting is autobiographical in nature.

 

Influenced by a wide array of acts such as Lana Del Rey, Lady Gaga, Carole King and Mumford & Sons, her music would be an easy fit for any fans of Dua Lipa, Bebe Rexha, Halsey, Jessie Ware, and Rita Ora.

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Explain how to overcome writer’s block.

To overcome writer’s block I stop trying to write and I go out and get some experiences and influences for a song. You can’t force it and I like to write songs which are autobiographical in nature. If I have the experience and I’m not sure how to express it then I wait. The expression will come.

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Tell us the tricks behind making a hit song.

The best songs are ones with powerful hook lines, something simple and memorable. Imagine you are writing a nursery rhyme for adults.

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Tell us how you get feedback for your demo before working on it.

I send it to family and friends and see what they think. However, I usually ignore it and carry on doing what I want and making the music I love regardless.

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Explain your recording experience in the studio.

I have had a mixture of experiences in different studios. The first time I recorded I wanted all live instruments so there was a lot of time taken up with setting things up and getting the perfect take. Since then, I have moved into a lot of electronic instruments and I love the flexibility it gives you, and ability to build up the sound.

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Tell us how you compose.

I sit at my keyboard and find a sequence of chords that sound good. I then let the words start flowing. I always leave the bridge till last as I tend to find that the hardest bit to write but overall I usually have a full song written in less than half an hour. If I decide to record it I will then spend some time making tweaks and fine tuning the lyrics.

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Tell us if you add effects to your vocals to sound better.

I only add reverb to my voice just to give it the usual effect of space, but apart from that, it’s all natural baby.

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Tell us the best streaming platform to get new fans.

I find YouTube to be the most influential for picking up new fans as it gives people a visual at the same time and a face behind a voice and a name.

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Tell us your opinion on music education.

I started learning the piano and having singing lessons from a very young age and after I graduated from university I took myself to London Music School. I have found the formal learning to be useful to this day, however not essential. Anyone with a passion and love for music can learn to do anything they set their hearts to.

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Discuss the shooting of a commercial music video for a song.

I love shooting music videos and coming up with a quirky concept. Ideas come in many forms, sometimes lucid dreams, comments on the lyrical content of the song or things people have said to me.

 

I love the freedom of doing what I want, dressing how I want and behaving in a way that isn’t ‘socially acceptable’ in everyday terms. I hand over the idea to my videographers who then put it into a full plan. We spend a day shooting the different scenes of the video and then it goes off for editing. It’s usually a fairly quick process and I have my video a couple of weeks later having made many edits.

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Tell us how you relate with other artists.

The songwriting and being an artist is a very individual experience and expression. I relate to other artists in so much as I love music and it’s my best way of expressing myself and sharing something with the world.

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Tell us if you can collaborate with an artist of a different genre.

Definitely, I believe collaborating across genres is a great way to come up with new unique sounding music and having a direct influence on what you do. It pushes your boundaries.

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Explain how to finance a music project.

With difficulty – Music is an expensive business and everyone I know has separate day jobs or businesses and some use crowdfunding.

 

You have to learn to be strategic in where to spend your money and what is going to have the biggest impact.

 

It is easy to go to a studio and spend thousands of pounds on a song but it won’t necessarily make it a great song.

 

You need to work with a producer who you have a great vibe with.

 

Equally, you can spend thousands on a PR campaign but if it isn’t translating into fans then you’d be best spending your money elsewhere.

 

Ultimately there’s always an element of trial and error but with the rise of online and streaming you need to be prepared to record great sounding music and with it have the visuals, branding, and marketing to go behind it.

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Explain how to copyright a musical work.

There are a few ways but my favourite is recording a song and then posting it to myself. The postage stamp will date it and as long as you leave the envelope closed that song is now copyrighted.

 

Alternatively, most modern recording devices will time and date stamp any recording you do which should be sufficient should you ever need to prove you own a song.

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Tell us how to generate income from a musical work.

Most people no longer buy music, they stream online, therefore, the main way for artists to generate income is through bookings for live shows and selling merchandise. Sync placements, such as getting a song placed in films, adverts or on TV can also be a great way to make money.

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List the name of organizations you know can be helpful to new artists.

AWAL has some great information out there and I have also found Sentric, Music Gateway and Reverbnation to be great.

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Send a message to your fans.

You rock, each and every one of you, just by being you.

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Explain the process involved in recording a vocal.

Obviously, you have to start by warming up and getting the levels on the mic right.

 

I group similar sections of the song together for recording to help with consistency across the song, so I usually start by recording the verses, then the pre-choruses, the bridge and then finally the chorus. By this point, I’ve got super comfortable with how I’m performing and so will probably go back and do the verses again.

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Elaborate on the song.

‘White Water’ was written about a tough time in my life where I felt very alone and like the world was crashing in around me, however, it was also my equivalent of a fight song; that I wasn’t prepared to give up no matter how hard things got.

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Elaborate on your artist name and the title of the album.

Just my name! It’s unique and if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.

 

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