Shenendoah Thompson - Boy Who Cried Wolf

Shenendoah Thompson

 

Shenendoah Thompson - Boy Who Cried Wolf

Shenendoah Thompson – Boy Who Cried Wolf

 

ARTIST NAME: Shenendoah Thompson

 

SONG TITLE:  Boy Who Cried Wolf

 

ALBUM TITLE: Elephant in the Room

 

GENRE:  Acoustic Rock/Singer-Songwriter

 

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Tell us how you build up this song.

“This song is about the boy who cried wolf… me.”

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Tell us the best means of becoming a famous artist and selling more records.

By loving what you do, and never being afraid to share your soul honestly with your audience.

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Tell us how fans are reacting to your music.

My first album “Under the Radar” was released to a very limited following, and I like to say now that I am music’s best-kept secret. I live proverbially “Under the Radar” and feel like every time a new fan finds my music, they show me a little piece of myself along the way.

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Explain how to deal with fear on stage.

For me, the stage is the place where everything slows down… the hectic hubbub of life disappears and my anxieties about who I am and what I’m supposed to do all melt-away.

 

I feel like on stage is exactly where I was meant to be and love every second I get to be up there.

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Tell us your point of view on the quality of production of today’s songs to old songs and point out what you think has changed.

I feel like the production quality in our recording capabilities has greatly improved throughout the years, though that has given rise to very distinct contrasting uses of various antiquated sounds.

 

I personally love the warmth of old 8-track and vinyl recordings, that faint audio hum from the reels. It gives rawness to the music that just cannot be imitated.

 

In the modern sounds of The 1975 and Bastille, synth pop layers build out otherwise acoustic tunes that really somehow capture the digital-vibe of a technology-hungry society. The vocals still have a nice warmth to them, but the music overall has throwbacks to 80s rock and ballads, which I think creates a really unique experience for the listener, as a vague familiarity with each tone and note seeps through.

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Tell us an interesting experience in your music career that is significant.

I’ve had the fortune to play at the Bitter End in NYC a handful of times, and each time I feel it’s a massive cause for celebration. The energy of the venue and the fact that so many great artists have graced that stage makes it a must for every artist.

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Tell us how you come across the lyrics of this song.

The lyrics in a lot of ways are how I like to perceive life’s obstacles. And I feel like as an artist I inhabit an idiom that is constantly shifting and not always easy for those in our lives to handle. “I had a dream we both were healed and still don’t talk.”

 

It’s also about self-perception, thinking of myself in terms of the wolf, in terms of the scared little pigs barricading themselves away from society, and the guilt for the decisions we make in how we overcome our fears.

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Tell us your best means of expressing yourself.

I find words are magic, they convey just about anything and when paired with the right musical melody, they can elicit feelings beyond this plane. When a song truly bears a portion of our souls, I feel that we connect on a universal level, something truly indescribable.

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Tell us your opinion on using music to deliberate on issues affecting people like corruption, immoralities, politics, and religion.

I believe that musicians are the voice that tackles these topics. In Bruce Cockburn’s “If I Had a Rocket Launcher” where he watches the genocide of nations, the murderous regimes that prey on innocent and unknowing civilians, he shouts that he wants to “make somebody pay” for all the evils.

 

Our best weapons are our words, and our steadfast commitment to a world that feels love over fear, compassion before jealousy, and forgiveness in the face of hate.

 

Bob Marley believed music was a holy experience, and I would be a fool to try and argue against that.

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Discuss how you plan to create a piece of timeless music that your fans can cherish forever.

I just plan to be as honest with myself as I can be, and through that to share the songs that move me, or that I feel manage to convey the plethora of feelings that we are privileged to experience.

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List the names of individuals you can point out as legends and state your reasons.

Dave Matthews: for his unique rhythmic style and collection of works, not to mention his stage presence and performance.

 

Bob Marley: for his catalog of work and songs, and again the sheer vitality of his stage presence.

 

David Byrne: for his work with Talking Heads, and with his poetic lyricism in his solo career.

 

I could go on forever about the legends and artists that influenced me, Hendrix, Zepplin, Beatles, The Who… but there are far too many to name them all and I’m sure I would forget at least one!

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Tell us your viewpoint on discriminating.

I feel that as a creator you sometimes need to be selective in order to show or tell a particular story, and I believe that not everything fits together in every single idiom – but I feel that discrimination based on uncontrollable variables (i.e. race, gender, heritage, sexual orientation) is isolationist and dangerous.

 

I believe there is a side of discrimination that can be helpful if it is more used as a means of clarification, categorization or a way to find where something can be included, but perhaps, like many words, it’s all in the usage.

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Tell us your favourite books and state your reason.    

I admittedly need to read more, but these are some of the types of books that I am inclined to pick up. My three most recently finished and loved books are:

 

A Higher Loyalty – James Comey

 

Last Words – George Carlin

 

Alice in Wonderland and Philosophy – a collection of essays compared to Lewis Carols’ writing.

 

I found that Higher Loyalty gave us a little more insight into who James Comey was when he took the position as director of FBI, and what proceeded and ultimately led to his dismissal. It was a poignant look at New York’s political history and what true integrity operates like.

 

Last Words is as funny as it is insightful, Carlin’s wit never rang truer than it does when musing on memories of childhood, spanning through his introduction into stand up and the groundbreaking material that would turn him into the icon we all loved.

 

Lastly, philosophical essays are something that I have always found a way to surround or immerse myself in. Lewis Carol’s imagination lends itself to some wonderful analogies of social contracts, and whether or not we can trust certain facts of life: “Ferrets are ferrets” or if that depends on the time they arrived at the tea party.

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Tell us what triggers your creativity.

Life triggers my creativity. If I hear a song, or someone says something with a quick turn of phrase, my brain rambles through thousands of verses with little care as per what I’m supposed to be paying attention to.  I find myself with dozens of notebooks on me, hundreds of pages full of word associations and rhymes and the occasional doodle. Nothing is off limits. My rule is: create, create, create…

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Tell us how you generate musical ideas for your composition.

I really just tap on the guitar, move the capo, and gently strum a chord; pick over notes. Maybe I’ll play a riff from an old familiar tune – it’s never the same and I can’t say I have one singular approach when it comes to writing the music.

 

The chords or the rhythm have to feel fresh, and they have to resonate within my chest – I like it when the idea of trying to play or say something vulnerable, bearing fully my soul’s belly; occasionally I weep. But these moments are the currency I have to trade for my time here, for that I can feel nothing but gratitude.

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Tell us your greatest song and state the reason.

I don’t think I’ve yet written my greatest song. I have a few that mean a lot to me, Boy Who Cried Wolf is very personal, and I try to sing it in mind to my son; so that he can know it is absolutely imperative that we follow our dreams and our passions.

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Tell us how you compose your song.

Lyrics usually come second, so almost always I start with just finding a new note or chord progression on the guitar. And since I’ve had limited opportunity to play with electric or pedals to modulate the sounds, I like to challenge myself to create unique tones simply using mutes or rhythm style.

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Elaborate on the song.

‘Boy Who Cried Wolf’ is definitely a song of healing for me. It gets me stomping and pulls a visceral cry from deep within. I wrap up my messy feelings and lay the box on a doorstep – probably one I’m proverbially knocking on – and beg for understanding.

 

The first verse is about feeling lost, feeling confused and staring in the mirror at an identity crisis. Randomly walking about, staring at feet – barely interacting with oneself or the world around.

 

The chorus is a cry for forgiveness – For acceptance.

 

The second verse battles with guilt and wondering if you did the best you could, and was your best good enough, and was it all in vain? Is there more that can be done still, and shall, and will?

 

The last verse is my atonement to my hometown – the monstrous public displays of my wolf-like hide. We must remember it’s easy to become a wolf in response to the woods around you… the challenge is to stay the pup – to dream and to chase.

 

“Listen to me my son, there can be only one, place my heartbeats from – it’s you & I.”

 

By the end I’m pleading with myself, the universe and the audience – I didn’t mean to cry wolf… but I did – Ha!

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Elaborate on your artist name and the title of the album.

I use my given name as a performer: Shenendoah Thompson, the title of this new album is The Elephant in the Room.

 

Mobile Version

Upstate Ja - 40 n my Shorty

Upstate Ja – 40 n my Shorty

 

Upstate Ja - 40 n my Shorty

Upstate Ja – 40 n my Shorty

 

ARTIST NAME: Upstate Ja

 

SONG TITLE:  40 n my Shorty

 

GENRE: Hip-Hop/Rap

 

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iTunes

 

Apple Music

 

Spotify

 

Upstate Ja is a true talent. The music he has already created has led those who are familiar with him to believe that he is a star in the making.

 

When asked about his chances in the rap game, Ja’s response is and always will be, put simply, “This is my destiny.” Something clicked for Ja. Suddenly, Ja found a clear path to spread his message and story.

 

A student of all types of music, Ja has been studying the art of hip hop through rappers like Rahkim, Andre 3000 and 50 Cent.

 

Ja explains, “I would describe my music as real, raw, and simply truthful. My purpose is to share my story. I am not here to be another player in the rap game; I have a story to tell. I know others have suffered hardships similar to mine and I truly believe that everyone can relate to my music.”

 

Ja’s music will one day act as an escape for his fans from the stressors of everyday life.

 

Growing up in one of the most poverty-stricken neighbourhoods in Albany, New York, Ja watched his father walk out of his life. While his mom did her best, her cocaine addiction that spurred from being a victim of domestic abuse, hindered her parenting abilities.

 

Thus, Ja found himself a problem child, traveling from foster home to foster home until he found himself selling drugs to provide for his siblings.

 

After a few stints in jail, Ja has been out of trouble for 12 years with three children and a full-time job.

 

Ja explains, “I am finally able to live a responsible and productive life. Prior to now, I have held my emotions and message inside.” A reflective thinker, Ja has stayed away from social media, remained very reserved, and kept a low profile.

 

Remember the name Upstate Ja because soon his story will influence the lives of many people.

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Tell us your names, country of birth and childhood experience.

Jameen T. pointer (Upstate Ja) born in the U.S.A. My childhood experiences were pretty rough being raised in a poverty-stricken community where all the worlds negativity, violence, and distractions greet you every day as you open your door – Very easy for one to fall victim too when in such environments.

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State your academic qualification.

I possess a general high school diploma with some courses in a community college in the field of business administration.

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Elaborate on your music career, band name, experience, and skills.

Thus far my music career has been quite a journey. It’s opened me up to a whole new world of possibilities I never thought would be possible.

 

I learned so much about life, love, the power of believing and being true to yourself.

 

During my career I’ve connected with many great people from producers such as Arty Skye of Skye Lab Music Group, to opening up for Tony Yayo; an artist out of 50 Cent’s G-Unit camp down to various open mic events.

 

The name Upstate Ja simply comes from my birthplace in Upstate N.Y. connected with the first to letters of my first name.

 

I have always been a fan of music for as long as I can remember. Unlike anything else music is everything; it teaches, it plays on your emotions, it can build you up, take you down and I love it.

 

My skills as an artist are songwriting and creative writing. I am improving with every new idea and session as I lay my vocals. There is always room for improvement to be better and every day my skills are being sharpened.

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Tell us your genre and idea behind your music video or song.

The genre of my music falls under hip hop/rap. Like all my ideas behind my music, they come from inside my memory/experience either I personally went through or witnessed at some point in time.

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Tell us how to run a record label based on your experience as an artist.

To run a record label first you must have an undeniable passion for music of all genres. I believe you must be dedicated and committed. You should be honest in every part of the business dealings, having the best intentions of believing in your label as well as the artist you sign to it.

 

I believe you should promote both just as equally because they are a reflection of each other.

 

Lastly, let nothing derail you from the goal which regards to being a solid honest businessman with great artists that create life-changing music that will last into eternity.

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Tell us how you are promoting your music.

My music is currently being promoted on all social media sites @ Upstate Ja.

 

An indie radio station out of Atlanta Georgia  106.3.

 

I’m also being promoted through a blog on Yvonne Wilcox Pen Name Network News – the creator of LHMPR Radio.

 

The single also appears on all digital music sites for sale. Reverberation, SoundCloud and YouTube.

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Explain the story behind the song.

The story behind the song is based on Bonnie and Clyde’s theme.

 

Staged in the communities of a ghetto the streets; the hood where a man and woman embarked on a journey of robbing different drug dealers like Bonnie and Clyde did banks.

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List the radio stations, television stations, and blogs that have aired or featured your new song.

106.3 Atlanta’s indie artist uncut radio station.

 

Yvonne Wilcox Pen Name Network News Blog.

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State the names of other members of your band, music producer, crew or music video director.

Upstate Ja consists of only 1 member – Upstate JA. The producer behind the song would be credited to N.Y. Bangers.

 

The creator behind the lyric video is credited to Arty Skye of Skye Lab Music Group.

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Elaborate on the song and music video.

A guy and woman in a relationship that involves robbing street as hustlers – It speaks about how loyal and trustworthy women can be at times more than men. In this song, her loyalty leads her to her own death.

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Tell us how long you have been in the music business, your experience, and your future goal.

I’ve been active laying actual groundwork in the music business for four years now starting in 2015.

 

Prior I have been a dedicated student observing taking in all the artists, all the songs; all that come with music from every angle all my life before deciding it was time to make an entrance.

 

I learned there are a lot of talents out there and the competition is real, it’s not an easy craft and it is an even tougher business.  Either way I know through my efforts, hard work and persistence I’m setting myself up for future success…

 

My future goal is to be able to live wholesome, educate, and entertain.

 

Indeed I plan to give back by investing in not only my community but communities around the world just trying to make a difference.

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Tell us what makes you unique from others.

I’m unique due to the facts that I feel my music is just raw, real and it’s my truth.

 

Reflecting back when I was lost in the street with the people  I was dealing with and living the life of damnation which most never make it out of. I dug deep inside myself and said I’m better than this I want a better life so I stepped out and decided to embark on a journey everyone thinks it is impossible. Four years later I’m still here grinding and it feels good.

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Tell us your weakness and strength pertaining to music.

My weakness would be my overthinking at times doubting my music; second guessing. My strengths would be my ability to always suppress those thoughts and keep writing, keep recording and just working.

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List your five favourite songs including the artists.

Position of Power- 50 Cent

 

Ambitionz Az A Ridah- 2PAC

 

The Convo- DMX

 

Quiet storm – Mobb Deep

 

40 n my Shorty- Upstate Ja

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Tell us your position on “Do It Yourself” and signing to a major label.

I think the ‘Do It Yourself’ concept can be very beneficial for the artist.  Overall it displays independence.

 

I think it’s an opportunity for the artists to show how bad they want success and it builds characters which at the end of the day I think makes them better artists.

 

Your names on everything, you are pretty much self-made to sum it up which is wonderful and you could be comfortable with that and do well for yourself.

 

At the same time, I feel a major label is the next level where everyone would like to be at some point in their career.

 

It is like others see your worth by believing in your art and willing to partner, invest and assist you in being the best artist and best brand you can be.

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Tell us other activities you are pursuing apart from music.

Aside from my passion and dedication to pursuing music; I’m also a dedicated father of three children. I’m also in pursuit of their happiness their wholeness. In pursuit of a bright future for them giving them the building blocks, they need to be successful early on in their lives, finding their passion, investing and never giving up.

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List your various works.

This song would be my first official release with a lyric video and digital distribution. Although there are other recorded songs available for listening on all my social media sites: Reverberation, SoundCloud, and YouTube @ Upstate Ja.

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State the official date of release.

The official release date was 5/10/2019.

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State your artist’s name and elaborate on it.

Coming from Upstate N.Y., I wanted to take that to make it known where I’m from without question and I joined it with the first two letters of my first name to create Upstate Ja.

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State the title of the song and the meaning.

40 n my Shorty – 40 is short termed for a 40 caliber handgun. Shorty is in reference to a female in this case. The two merged and became catchy upon repeating it so that’s what I went with.

 

Mobile Version