Tony Marino – Sam’s

 

Tony Marino – Sam’s

Tony Marino – Sam’s

 

Artist – Tony Marino

 

Song Title – Sam’s

 

Genre – Jazz

 

Website

 

Facebook

 

CD Baby

 

Apple Music

 

iTunes

 

Reverbnation

 

Spotify

 

Tony Marino is a Latin jazz pianist, composer, and recording engineer based in Ft. Wayne, Indiana.

 

The artist fell in love with music at an early age. At just 7-years old he started playing piano and has been hooked ever since.

 

In his early days, Tony was inspired by the iconic Leon Russell and strove to become professional pianist, composer, and performer.

 

Tony started studying piano with Bill DelGovenatore. This is where Tony’s journey into the world of jazz began. Bill introduced Tony to the jazz genre and even introduced him to famous artists such as Thelonious Monk. This was a true turning point for Tony, and the start of his immersion into jazz and Latin inspired music.

 

While studying, Tony was making ends meet working in a music store. This store became foundational to Tony’s immersion into the music scene. For instance, he developed connections with famous jazz musicians such as Al Stauffer and Frank DiBussolo. Eventually, Bill introduced Tony to Tom Lawton who became Tony’s final mentor and piano tutor.

 

In 1974, Tony was the keyboardist for a Philadelphia Italian-American band called Idea ’71. However, Tony left the group to continue his education. After that, he relocated to Ft. Wayne, Indiana.

 

After this significant life change, Tony was able to discover a tight and warm jazz community in his brand new hometown. It was there that Tony formed Tony Marino and Havana Heat. This talented and seasoned group of musicians became regulars on the live music circuit. They performed at clubs, venues, festivals, and private events.

 

In 1997, Tony released his debut album “Tony Marino & Havana Heat: The Latin Jazz Project.” The music from this project was featured heavily on local radio such as WBNI FM. This release launched Tony Marino into the spotlight and onto the national stage.

 

The band had later changed their name to Tony Marino’s Latin Jazz Sounds. While leading this band, Tony also released four albums and published the songbook The Latin Jazz Project. During this time, Tony freely explored diverse Latin inspired genres such as samba, bossa nova, and calypso.

 

Eventually, Tony relocated to Jersey and then on to Santa Barbara for a handful of years.

 

In California, Tony attended jazz jam sessions and played with a variety of established artists such as Jeff Elliot, and Rene Martinez, to mention but a few. No matter where he traveled, Tony always carried his passion and love for music with him. He was able to quickly develop bonds and relationships in the jazz scene on a national level.

 

The composer /artist has released an impressive eleven albums over his 20-year career. Tony is the sole creative mind behind his projects and is responsible for writing, composing, and producing his own original music.

 

Tony’s releases have always been greeted with critical acclaim and approval from his fans. What makes Tony stand out in the industry is that he is able to captivate and connect with jazz enthusiasts and novices alike.

 

His music is accessible and thrilling, gaining him a loyal following of avid fans and admirers from around the world.

 

The best part of it is that Tony shows no signs of slowing down! He has two upcoming releases that are due to hit the shelves this year.

 

In his own words, “I am dedicated to becoming a better musician and creating original music.” After listening to his releases it’s immediately apparent that Tony is a passionate and skilled musician with raw talent.

.

.

.

 

Discuss how you develop your melody.

For this particular song “Sam’s” the melody was developed reminiscing about how the day would progress working at Sam D’Amico’s Music store in South Philly during the mid-’70s.

.

.

.

 

Tell us your source of inspiration.

During my freshman year attending Bishop Neumann High School in South Philadelphia, I started working at Sam D’Amico’s Music store. This played a significant role in my musical development.

 

While working at Sam’s, I started studying piano with Bill DelGovenatore, I met drummer Joe Pagano who recruited me to play in a local Philadelphia Italian American Wedding Band “Idea 71”.

 

While working at Sam’s I met many musicians such as Frank DiBussolo, Ron Nocella, Carl Mottola, Ron Tempesta, Al Stauffer, Tom Lawton, and many others.  Eventually, I had to resign from Sam’s because of my busy school and gigging schedule.

 

Many of the musicians helped me and I also met many of the people who lived in the area who were interested in music. It was a great time. I miss those days and all of the people at the store. Unfortunately, Sam, Al, and Carl have passed. All of the events were the inspiration and dedication of this song.

.

.

.

 

Tell us the most memorable experience in your music career.

I have been very lucky and have had many memorable experiences – Meeting, studying and playing with many musicians who I admire. The one of that stands out was when my family and I went to a jazz festival and Claudio Roditi called me out of the audience, and I got to play with Claudio Roditi and Marvin Stamm. It was unexpected and went very well.

.

.

.

 

Discuss how you build your song.

Every song is different, and it really depends on what the inspiration is for the piece I am working on. Sometimes it may start with a rhythmic phrase, a chord progression or a melodic idea. I write a lot and I do not use a set process to compose a song.

.

.

.

 

Tell us how you ensure your music inspires others.

I am inspired by people, situations, places, etc… I believe that people relate to the music that has been inspired by them.

.

.

.

 

Discuss the relevance of promotion to the music business.

Getting the music to new people is the key. We have dedicated listeners since I released my first CD as a leader “Tony Marino & Havana Heat the Latin Jazz Project” in 1997.

 

We have been successful in getting people who normally do not listen to jazz interested in jazz.

 

Latin Jazz is special because the rhythm gets people’s attention and keeps them interested in listening.

 

Getting music to new people is a big challenge and is important to the survival of this music.

.

.

.

Tell us what you will do apart from music.

After many years of working, going to school and working on music, I am focused solely on my music career.

.

.

.

 

List the names of the instruments you can play.

I play the piano. I arrange and write music for all instruments.

.

.

.

 

Tell us if you have any music background.

I am the only musician in my family. I have been studying music since I was 7 years old.

.

.

.

Tell us the piece of advice you will give to a new artist on entering the music chart.

Make sure you learn everything you can about music, the music business and make sure you have a second career.

 

Always be persistent, professional, polite and on time. You also have to know when to start and stop projects.

 

Stay away from drugs and alcohol and play with people who are better than you – If you are ever in a situation where you are over your head; work hard to pull yourself to the next level.

 

Listen to common criticisms about your playing and work to get better.

 

Stay away from trouble and never play for free unless you are going to a jam session.

.

.

.

 

Elaborate on melody and rhythm.

The rhythm defines the type of song and it is important to understand what rhythms are related to the genre of music you are playing.

 

The harmony and melody need to be understood. In creating music, it is important to know the rules and when you need to follow them.

.

.

.

 

State your future goals.

I am dedicated to practicing, writing, recording original music. Currently, I am working on a CD that is going to be released in 2020 and a few other projects that will be released in the future.

.

.

.

 

Share your recording experience with us.

During the summer of 1976, in between my freshman and sophomore years in high school, Michele “Mike” Elia the Saxophonist I played with, in the band Idea 71″ recorded an album, at Frank Virtue’s Recording Studios, in North Philadelphia.

 

During the sessions, Mike wanted to rent an alto saxophone to use on this recording. At that time, I was working at Sam’s music store.  I called Sam and asked him if he had an alto saxophone that Mike could use. Sam had two, a brand-new Selmer and an off-brand that wasn’t in the best shape; Sam agreed to rent the Selmer for $75 dollars and the other for $15 dollars.

 

We were a little tight on money so Mike chose the $15 option. While we were recording the first song I heard a few clicking sounds followed by a loud voice screaming “Mother… – it fell apart.” Everyone including Mike started laughing.

 

While Mike was playing, the saxophone parts fell off and we weren’t able to finish the session. It was a little frustrating because he was still paying for studio time.

 

We called Sam and he cut Mike a break on renting the Selmer. After we finished recording during the mixing phase, we were in the control listening to the mix. It was early in the morning we were really tired. All of the playbacks were at a comfortable volume level just as I started to doze off this very loud scream “Mother…- it fell apart.” overpowered the music. Everyone started laughing.

 

One of the tracks had Mike’s famous vocal track that never made it to vinyl. The album was instrumental.

.

.

.

 

Tell us the most difficult part of a recording.

The toughest thing for me is to relax and not worry about making mistakes.

.

.

.

Discuss the greatest mistake you have ever made in your music career.

There were a few times when I should have put business before personal feelings.

.

.

.

 

Tell us how you build up your composition.

Each song is different. Depending on how the idea starts; the melody, harmony, and rhythm work hand in hand and that will define the finished product.

.

.

.

 

Discuss the relevance of music.

Music is one of the most important elements of all societies. It is used in every aspect of life. It connects people and is the universal language of our planet.

.

.

.

Elaborate on the song.

The song was inspired during my employment at Sam D’Amico’s music store.

 

The song represents the cycle of a day working at the store. It starts out with the rhythm section and the Marimbas playing the melody.

 

Parts of the melody are played by the vibes, flute, steel pans and marimbas along with the improvisation that is done on the piano.

 

The instruments represent the different customers, music students, delivery personnel, music teachers and the events that occurred throughout the day.

 

Each day started out and ended almost the same way, each day was slightly different because there were different music teachers and students depending on the day’s schedule.

 

It was a great meeting place and I have many fond memories of all the people I met, worked with and learned from during the early stages of my music career.

.

.

.

 

Elaborate on your artist name and the title of the album.

I was named after my father Anthony Gaetano Marino Sr. My dad was called Tony and people called me Anthony to avoid confusion.

 

When I started working people started calling me Tony and after my Dad passed away when I was 16 people referred to me as Tony and it is the name I use.

 

The album title “Family and Friends” is my dedication to all of the people that matter to me my “Family and Friends”.

 

Mobile Version


Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

SIGN INTO YOUR ACCOUNT CREATE NEW ACCOUNT

Your privacy is important to us and we will never rent or sell your information.

 
×
 
×
FORGOT YOUR DETAILS?
×

Go up

Select your currency
USD United States (US) dollar
EUR Euro