AUTOM8theSKY - Can't Get It Out of My Mind

AUTOM8theSKY

 

AUTOM8theSKY - Can't Get It Out of My Mind

AUTOM8theSKY – Can’t Get It Out of My Mind

 

ARTIST NAME: AUTOM8theSKY

 

SONG TITLE: Can’t Get It Out of My Mind

 

ALBUM TITLE: AUTOM8theSKY

 

RELEASE DATE: May 10th, 2019

 

GENRE: Rock

 

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AUTOM8theSKY`s Jody Joseph, born and raised in Brooklyn, New York is most recognized as guitarist and vocalist of the band Chew the Cud.

 

His talents as a singer, songwriter, and guitarist shows in his predominantly guitar-driven alternative rock indie sound, that’s balanced with a splash of electronics, the likes of which has been compared to a wide array of iconic artists such as The Shins, Wilco, Roxy music, Franz Ferdinand, Jeff Lynne, the Cars and David Bowie.

 

Along with the help of award-winning music producer/engineer Arty Shweky, Joseph just finished recording his new EP and is thrilled for its release.

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Discuss your composition and melody.

I was playing around with the chord progression for a while. I was just finding the right moment to fill it with words. I started this song off with a chorus which is something I don’t do too often. I thought the line grabbed me and conveyed the sentiment I wanted to relay.

 

The melody was a work in process between my producer Arty Shwecky and me. We came up with the riffs together. Arty came up with these faint synth lines in the verses which I absolutely loved. It resonated well because the song described moments where my mind was in disarray and his synth lines fit right in.

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Elaborate on the song.

It’s a song about introspection; doing something wrong and correcting it.

 

I had an exchange with one of my daughters.  I had a lot of things on my mind as there was a lot going on at the moment especially prior to my exchange. I was short and abrupt with her. I felt bad and apologized. As transient and small as the incident was, I just couldn’t get it out of my mind for the next half or so. It bothered me that I made her feel bad and responded to her that way.

 

So I began to write. The song was inspired by my exchange with her but was not about her. It should not be taken literally as I wrote with hyperbole.

 

As I progressed in that writing session, I began to pile on with exaggeration as if to allude that everything in my world was going south.

 

My take away as a response to writing “Can’t get it out of my Mind”; just because I had a moment whereby I was hit with multiple issues at every angle, that should not stop me from handling myself with poise and grace with any interaction within those moments.

 

A common theme in some of my songs is being able to handle pressure effectively.

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Elaborate on your music career.

I’ve been playing, and still do with Chew the Cud. Chew the Cud is mostly a cover band playing classic and current alternative rock. We have been playing together since 2008. The band consists of two very dear friends of mine who are like brothers to me, Jeff Beyda and Ted Salame. We’ve known each other since childhood.

 

Our shows are extravaganzas with all different forms of entertainment. Every year is different. Every year has different guests.  Chew the Cud shows are not so much about us – it’s about the show!

 

We do have some originals and have worked on a concept album that will hopefully see the light of day sometime.

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Discuss your motive behind making music.

Growing up, music has always been like food and air for me. As I got into adulthood and life got busier and more complicated, listening to music on a daily basis was not as much of a necessity as it once was. Of course, I would listen and play music but it didn’t have to take place every day.

 

Ironically, for some strange reason, that’s when I began to write. I realized there were things that I needed to say.   There is nothing better than expressing oneself with words in tandem with music – It makes me feel good. If people gravitate towards my music and it makes someone else feel good, then that is the ultimate accomplishment for me.

 

I always had a sound and style in mind. Along with my collaboration with Arty, we implemented that style and we let it morph into something much more, hence the sound of AUTOM8theSKY.

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Discuss your songwriting and themes.

The bulk of a song can take me a half hour to write or it can take me 3 years. There have been ideas and concepts that have sat idle for years only to be rejuvenated and finally come to completion.

 

My easiest writing comes when I’m amidst a situation – When the subject matter is in full swing when my passion is in high gear. My feelings pour out.

 

The challenge is to make those words sound right with the music you are playing.

 

Once you think the song is written to completion; it really isn’t. It ferments in my brain. It will ruminate in my head for 2 – 3 days.

 

I will then go back to the song and tweak and revise until it feels right to me. I try my best to maximize on each song.

 

Most songs I write, I have a chord progression all tied up and ready to go. The melody develops over time.

 

Each song is different in its writing. Some have one topic; some have 3-4 topics going on simultaneously. Some tell a story, some tell several stories in confluence such as “Cracked Guitar.”

 

A given song may have nonfiction in one sentence and fiction in the next. I always say, do not take all my lyrics literally or autobiographical.

 

Some of my songs are vague and could mean anything. I encourage the listener to hear it the way they want to hear it and make associations to how it could fit their particular life.

 

If I can interconnect and have a symbiosis with the listener, then I have achieved my goal as a writer, musician, and artist.

 

There is some diversity in themes and content in my composition.

 

A lot of my writings tackle sociological issues. How human beings interact with one another or how human beings can improve, self-included. Sometimes problems need to be stated so we can correct it.

 

This world we live in is a beautiful world. What makes it beautiful is that things are imperfect. Some moments are great, some are good, some moments are bad, some moments are terrible and some moments are neutral.

 

We are all faced with challenges and we all have to figure out the best ways to work through them.

 

Some songs make references to my loved ones and how they make me happy.

 

Other songs make reference to things that piss me off.

 

A common theme is being inundated with so much going on at once coupled with technology; trying to streamline so I can figure what the heck that’s bothering me.

 

The need and yearning in giving myself ample time to think.

 

Other themes are the difference in perceptions in people or even me. How the mind is working at a given moment. How the mind can play tricks on you; thought patterns which can affect human behaviour.

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Elaborate on your work and achievement so far in your music career.

Too early to tell – “Real to Me” is my debut album.

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Tell us your opinion on using rhymes dictionary or writing software to develop lyrics.

I see nothing wrong with using rhyme dictionaries. It’s not like you’ve never heard of these words you are pulling out. You just need to have access to these words when you need it. They are not always at the forefront of one’s mind.

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Discuss the music industry.

On a positive note – So many choices today as to what to listen to… So many genres – Many songs and artists are an amalgamation of genres.

 

Music listening today is fragmented – So many different vehicles to listen through. You have streaming services, Satellite radio -Sirius, cable TV radio, internet radio, traditional FM-AM, downloading and so on and so on.

 

Because of these different mediums, I feel it’s difficult for artists to dominate and appeal to the masses like they did when I grew up. It’s also difficult for them to have staying power. There are exceptions of course.  Back then, there wasn’t much choice in finding new music.

 

There was FM radio, MTV, VH1 and that’s it. I would read Rolling Stone and Spin magazine cover to cover. If I saw an artist get positive reviews from two different sources, I went out to Tower Records in the village after a night out with friends usually around midnight and bought those CDs. While I was there I would end up picking up some other artists and go deep into their catalogs. This was a once a week ritual.

 

I don’t feel there is one particular style that the masses are listening to…Very different from the 60s, 70s, 80s, 90s, 00s. It’s unlimited today.

 

People say rock n roll is not in favour today. I don’t believe that nor do I care. I’m going to listen to whatever I want whether people think it’s in favour or not. Incidentally, I have been finding plenty of new modern rock artists that I enjoy listening to.

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Elaborate on how you prepare yourself for a recording session.

When I’m in the studio, I make sure to eat a meal beforehand and I drink a lot of water.

 

Vocally, I take a good 15 -20 minutes of takes before my voice gets warmed up. I make sure not to strain. The voice will come with proper warming and a lot of abdominal breathing.

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Brief us on your preference in terms of tempo as in up-tempo, mid-tempo or slow tempo.

I prefer creating mid to up-tempo songs. In today’s fast-paced world where people lose interest quickly- I feel it’s appropriate.

 

I’m in a phase of high throttle guitar driven songs with some crunch which gets my blood flowing. Incorporate some celestial atmospherics and it sounds right to me at this point in time.

 

That’s not to say I do not like slow songs. I’m sure some slow songs will come – I’m just not there yet.

 

Mobile Version

Jess Glynne & Jax Jones - One Touch

Jess Glynne & Jax Jones – One Touch

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jess Glynne & Jax Jones - One Touch

Jess Glynne & Jax Jones – One Touch

 

 

 

 

 

Jess Glynne & Jax Jones – One Touch

 

Singer and songwriter Jess Glynne and DJ Jax Jones team up to release the song entitled ‘One Touch’ with an amazing video via Atlantic Records.

 

Jax Jones:

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Jess Glynne:

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One Touch

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Jax Jones:

Timucin Kwong Wah Lam, known as Jax Jones, is an English DJ, record producer, songwriter, and remixer.

 

He is best known for his 2017 single “You Don’t Know Me” featuring RAYE which peaked at number three on the UK Singles Chart, “Instruction” featuring Demi Lovato and Stefflon Don and “Breathe” featuring Ina Wroldsen.

 

He also featured on Duke Dumont’s single “I Got U”, which peaked at number one on the UK Singles Chart in 2014.

 

Jess Glynne:

With a deep and soulful tone similar to Jessie J and Adele, Grammy-winning singer/songwriter Jess Glynne made her early 2010s breakthrough in the U.K. as the voice of chart-topping electronic dance tracks “My Love” with Route 94 and “Rather Be” with chamber-music-meets-house act Clean Bandit.

 

As a solo artist, she scored additional chart-toppers and a number one album with her 2015 debut, ‘I Cry When I Laugh.’

 

Glynne was born and raised north of London, singing from a young age. Staying connected to the music industry via odd jobs and college courses, she signed a deal with Atlantic Records in 2013.

 

From there, she contributed vocals to several key tracks, which helped launch her career into the mainstream.

 

Route 94’s “My Love” topped charts in the U.K. and Scotland, finding the ears of Clean Bandit, who recruited Glynne for 2014’s “Rather Be,” which became a global smash and took home a Grammy for Best Dance Recording.

 

Two singles became Glynne’s first to chart under her own name: both “Right Here” (with Gorgon City) and “Real Love” (with Clean Bandit) hit the British Top Ten before the end of the year.

 

In 2015, Glynne hit number one again as a featured act (on Tinie Tempah’s “Not Letting Go”), but she also topped the chart as a solo act with “Hold My Hand.”

 

Her debut full-length, ‘I Cry When I Laugh’ followed in August 2015 on Atlantic.

 

Buoyed by her success on the singles charts, ‘I Cry When I Laugh’ debuted at number one on the U.K. albums chart. The album led to an extensive touring schedule, which wrapped up in late 2016, only for Glynne to dive back into the studio at the start of 2017.

 

After weeks spent writing in Los Angeles, she retreated to the countryside for additional recording sessions alongside a team of her closest collaborators.

 

She wrote most of the record during that time, including the lead singles “These Days” with Rudimental, Macklemore, and Dan Caplen and “I’ll Be There,” which became her seventh number one.

 

The album ‘Always in Between’ arrived in October 2018 and topped the U.K. charts.

 

She then paired with Jax Jones for the single “One Touch” in May 2019.

 ~ James Wilkinson & Neil Z. Yeung, Rovi

 

Mobile Version

Rusty Reid - The Meaning of Life

Rusty Reid – The Meaning of Life

 

Rusty Reid - The Meaning of Life

Rusty Reid – The Meaning of Life

 

Rusty Reid – The Meaning of Life

 

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Rusty Reid is an American, indie rock, singer-songwriter. He was born and raised in West Texas, later honing his songwriting mostly in Houston. He subsequently relocated to Los Angeles and then to the Seattle area.

 

Rusty writes melodic, guitar-powered songs, many of which are philosophic, political and/or spiritual (not religious) in thematic content.

 

He writes songs for the world, extolling universal virtue, defending the oppressed, and frequently throwing musical fireballs at the citadel of conformity and all its many cults.

 

Rusty Reid’s latest release is the album “Head to Heart,” a 78-minute “Revolutionary Manifesto in Song!”

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Tell us how you build the confidence to face the audience.

I am not particularly shy about facing an audience. The only thing I worry about is remembering the lyrics and chords.

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Tell us your weakness and strength in performance.

My strength is the melodic and lyrical content of my songs. I don’t think of myself as a “performer.” I’m a storyteller and truth-bringer.

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Discuss your songwriting.

I have been writing songs since I was 12 years old. It took me four years to write a good one.

 

In my younger days, my songs were the standard fare about love and loss of love.

 

Over the past few decades, I have been turning my songwriting to explore two primary themes: personal evolution and social evolution. Change for the better, in each realm, is what the world needs now.

 

I still want to deliver original melodies and lyrics that no one has heard before, and themes that discuss the most important concepts, including the meaning of life.

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List your other skills apart from singing.

First and foremost I’m a songwriting philosopher. My singing gets the job done for what I’m trying to communicate. No one else sounds like me. I don’t even sound like me sometimes.

 

My guitar playing is rather unique; I don’t claim to be a great player, but the lines are well crafted and delivered. I do also have players that are world class.

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Tell us the most memorable moment in your music career.

Probably the day I realized that I had been trying to follow the lead of others. Now I am blazing my own path.

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Discuss your first performance.

I started off as an actor, not a singer, playing the lead in a community play. I thought I would have stage fright, but I didn’t. Soon enough I segued into singing and playing guitar on stage. The first time for a large audience was at a high school assembly. In one evening I went from being a ‘nobody’ to being one of the most popular students. Hail, hail rock and roll.

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Elaborate on what you know about the music business.

Enough to know it has always sucked.

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List the instruments you can play.

Guitar, bass, keys, and drum programming.

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Tell us how you tackle a pitch in your performance.

I have never had much problem with it.

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Tell us how you build your melody.

Original melodies are extremely important to me. The clone melodies that predominate much of contemporary pop and country music are a plague (ditto the voices and lyrics… so much same-same-same).

 

I grew up in the 1960s where almost every tune had a great – never heard before – melody (plus distinctive voices… OK, lyrics sometimes weren’t all that great…. It was the melodies that stood out).

 

That original melody is what I strive for.  I usually write melody and lyrics together, so when first starting; either side can lead the way.

 

As the song comes together, its structure will emerge and the rest of the lyrics have to conform. But once the first draft of the song is finished, now it’s time to go back to both melody and lyrics and start tweaking… always looking for that originality. Can this melody do something unexpected? Has this lyric been said before? These are the essential questions I’m asking to transform an OK song into a much better one.

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Describe your live performance and recording in the studio.

I play live solo and sometimes with a band. With the band, I’m more energetic, but also allowing the wash of music to inspire. Think Tom Petty perhaps. I’m not a dancer. I don’t have dancers behind me. I don’t have a light show. Playing solo I try to deliver a little more “soulful” performance. It’s just me and guitar, nothing else. With both, I enjoy communicating back and forth with the audience between songs. I’m not Bob Dylan.

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Tell us if you prefer using live instruments for your recording.

“Live?” You mean everyone playing together in a studio? No, we don’t do that. My players are all over the world. But except for the occasional drum machine, it is real players playing real guitars, pianos, drums, etc.

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Tell us the feedback you are getting pertaining to your music.

So far, so good; although this album is too deep thematically for the attention span of most listeners – “Head to Heart” is a philosophic, political, spiritual journey. Most listeners are seeking a much shallower, quickie, experience.

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Discuss how you record your song.

Each song is different. On “Head to Heart,” I play all of the instruments on a few songs, the rest include at least one other musician. Only one of them, a drummer, is one of my local buddies; all the rest are far-flung around the world.

I send them the work that I have developed so far, and they add their contribution, which may range from a bass part to a complete revamp of the song.

Almost every track on the album was recorded at someone’s home studio. I am in the Seattle area. I have contributors from L.A., Nashville, Atlanta, Brazil, Ireland, Germany, India, etc.

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Tell us if you write all your songs.

Yes, or co-write.

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State your favourite song.

Varies – The most commercial is probably the title song “Head to Heart.” Currently, my fave is “There is a Pleasure in the Pathless Woods,” a musical take on the famous poem by Lord Byron.

 

There are three songs on the album that I “co-wrote” with famous poets. The others are “Eldorado” with Edgar Allan Poe, and “Sat Cit Ananda” with the anonymous author of the Indian “Moola Mantra.”

 

In each of these songs, I take a different approach to bringing these old words into the modern world of ideas and problems.

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Discuss the themes of your songs.

Ah, the themes – Simply the most important ideas of human history. The Story of Now. The Meaning of Life. Seeking Oneself. Universal Truth. Wisdom. Compassion. Oneness.

 

And a rundown of everything still fucked up about society: injustice, economic disparity, conservatism, women’s subjugation, animal abuse, pollution, global warming, etc.

 

If you want songs about ego or sex or trucks or bikinis or beer, this is not the album for you.

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Elaborate on the song.

Every song on the album is a philosophical, political and/or spiritual statement. You may or may not agree with the statement. But, if you do not, be prepared to have your mindset challenged. The world is changing; it always does. The question is how is it going to change. For better? Or for worse? And which is which?

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Elaborate on your artist name and the title of the album.

My name is Rusty Reid. The album was originally titled “Another Way,” because just about every song is speaking to another way of doing things from the way we are currently doing so. But that’s a bit cryptic, so after I wrote the song “Head to Heart,” I thought that might be a more appealing, immediately resonant…

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Share your press release and review with us.

Head to Heart:

 

Rusty Reid’s new CD, aptly titled, Head to Heart, takes us on a musical journey reminiscent of the 60s, punctuated with tones of East Indian sitar-like sounds in the song, “Sat Cit Ananda.”

 

Raising the question whether the Baby Boomer generation, the one that embraced flower power, has taken us where we wanted to go, Rusty’s musical statements have me reflecting on my past as well as the present.

“To Find Me” is an example of this soul-searching while the song, “Dismaland” commands, “We are better than this; we can turn it around.” Covering topics that should be near and dear to anyone, “Head to Heart” hits its mark beautifully.

– Vicki Welch Ayo, author (“Boys from Houston”)

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Jean-Mikhael – Senorita

Jean-Mikhael – Senorita

 

Jean-Mikhael – Senorita

Jean-Mikhael – Senorita

 

Jean-Mikhael – Senorita

 

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“I leave my stamp everywhere I go” states Jean-Mikhael with quiet confidence. “I would never want someone to hear me on the radio and for them to say ‘who’s that?’”

 

JM was born into a house bursting with creativity. His Grenadian-born mother worked as Boney M.’s hair stylist back in the day and passed on the tales of Jean-Mikhael’s late granddad – a saxophonist who played in Chicago’s live music scene – to the rest of the family.

 

His dad, who lives in France was likewise musical, he was with relatives from day one mastering everything from making ballet shoes to playing the accordion. “Everything was creative,” he explains.

 

It’s a lesson JM has carried with him to the present day. And taking influence from Michael Jackson – whose shoes he occupied for eight months as a young actor – he constantly looks up to Prince, Beyoncé, and TLC; all great artistic powerhouses who command stages with the sheer force of their personalities, express themselves with bold fashion, and who refuse to operate within boxes.

 

“Everything has to be a show,” he says. “As an artist, the image is everything.”

 

Jean-Mikhael’s debut EP, ‘The Deal,’ is all about boundless expression.

 

Theatricality and stunning visuals center his music; a distinct melting pot of sensual R&B, intimate songwriting and inventive, glossy pop production.

 

JM’s songwriting draws on past troubles and emerges from the storm with his head held high.

 

This is an EP that strikes the refresh button, presenting a brand new piece of unheard music to get stuck into, and the first chunky taste of what Jean-Mikhael is all about.

 

And looking forward, JM typically has his eyes on the next creative endeavour. “I’m already thinking about the next thing,” he says. “You need to think, how can I better it?”

 

“No filters” is an apt description for ‘The Deal’ and JM as a whole, too.

 

Influenced by striking conceptual art and high fashion alike, Jean-Mikhael doesn’t believe in style over substance. For him, style is substance instead.

 

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