AUTOM8theSKY - Can't Get It Out of My Mind

 

AUTOM8theSKY - Can't Get It Out of My Mind

AUTOM8theSKY – Can’t Get It Out of My Mind

 

ARTIST NAME: AUTOM8theSKY

 

SONG TITLE: Can’t Get It Out of My Mind

 

ALBUM TITLE: AUTOM8theSKY

 

RELEASE DATE: May 10th, 2019

 

GENRE: Rock

 

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AUTOM8theSKY`s Jody Joseph, born and raised in Brooklyn, New York is most recognized as guitarist and vocalist of the band Chew the Cud.

 

His talents as a singer, songwriter, and guitarist shows in his predominantly guitar-driven alternative rock indie sound, that’s balanced with a splash of electronics, the likes of which has been compared to a wide array of iconic artists such as The Shins, Wilco, Roxy music, Franz Ferdinand, Jeff Lynne, the Cars and David Bowie.

 

Along with the help of award-winning music producer/engineer Arty Shweky, Joseph just finished recording his new EP and is thrilled for its release.

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Discuss your composition and melody.

I was playing around with the chord progression for a while. I was just finding the right moment to fill it with words. I started this song off with a chorus which is something I don’t do too often. I thought the line grabbed me and conveyed the sentiment I wanted to relay.

 

The melody was a work in process between my producer Arty Shwecky and me. We came up with the riffs together. Arty came up with these faint synth lines in the verses which I absolutely loved. It resonated well because the song described moments where my mind was in disarray and his synth lines fit right in.

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Elaborate on the song.

It’s a song about introspection; doing something wrong and correcting it.

 

I had an exchange with one of my daughters.  I had a lot of things on my mind as there was a lot going on at the moment especially prior to my exchange. I was short and abrupt with her. I felt bad and apologized. As transient and small as the incident was, I just couldn’t get it out of my mind for the next half or so. It bothered me that I made her feel bad and responded to her that way.

 

So I began to write. The song was inspired by my exchange with her but was not about her. It should not be taken literally as I wrote with hyperbole.

 

As I progressed in that writing session, I began to pile on with exaggeration as if to allude that everything in my world was going south.

 

My take away as a response to writing “Can’t get it out of my Mind”; just because I had a moment whereby I was hit with multiple issues at every angle, that should not stop me from handling myself with poise and grace with any interaction within those moments.

 

A common theme in some of my songs is being able to handle pressure effectively.

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Elaborate on your music career.

I’ve been playing, and still do with Chew the Cud. Chew the Cud is mostly a cover band playing classic and current alternative rock. We have been playing together since 2008. The band consists of two very dear friends of mine who are like brothers to me, Jeff Beyda and Ted Salame. We’ve known each other since childhood.

 

Our shows are extravaganzas with all different forms of entertainment. Every year is different. Every year has different guests.  Chew the Cud shows are not so much about us – it’s about the show!

 

We do have some originals and have worked on a concept album that will hopefully see the light of day sometime.

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Discuss your motive behind making music.

Growing up, music has always been like food and air for me. As I got into adulthood and life got busier and more complicated, listening to music on a daily basis was not as much of a necessity as it once was. Of course, I would listen and play music but it didn’t have to take place every day.

 

Ironically, for some strange reason, that’s when I began to write. I realized there were things that I needed to say.   There is nothing better than expressing oneself with words in tandem with music – It makes me feel good. If people gravitate towards my music and it makes someone else feel good, then that is the ultimate accomplishment for me.

 

I always had a sound and style in mind. Along with my collaboration with Arty, we implemented that style and we let it morph into something much more, hence the sound of AUTOM8theSKY.

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Discuss your songwriting and themes.

The bulk of a song can take me a half hour to write or it can take me 3 years. There have been ideas and concepts that have sat idle for years only to be rejuvenated and finally come to completion.

 

My easiest writing comes when I’m amidst a situation – When the subject matter is in full swing when my passion is in high gear. My feelings pour out.

 

The challenge is to make those words sound right with the music you are playing.

 

Once you think the song is written to completion; it really isn’t. It ferments in my brain. It will ruminate in my head for 2 – 3 days.

 

I will then go back to the song and tweak and revise until it feels right to me. I try my best to maximize on each song.

 

Most songs I write, I have a chord progression all tied up and ready to go. The melody develops over time.

 

Each song is different in its writing. Some have one topic; some have 3-4 topics going on simultaneously. Some tell a story, some tell several stories in confluence such as “Cracked Guitar.”

 

A given song may have nonfiction in one sentence and fiction in the next. I always say, do not take all my lyrics literally or autobiographical.

 

Some of my songs are vague and could mean anything. I encourage the listener to hear it the way they want to hear it and make associations to how it could fit their particular life.

 

If I can interconnect and have a symbiosis with the listener, then I have achieved my goal as a writer, musician, and artist.

 

There is some diversity in themes and content in my composition.

 

A lot of my writings tackle sociological issues. How human beings interact with one another or how human beings can improve, self-included. Sometimes problems need to be stated so we can correct it.

 

This world we live in is a beautiful world. What makes it beautiful is that things are imperfect. Some moments are great, some are good, some moments are bad, some moments are terrible and some moments are neutral.

 

We are all faced with challenges and we all have to figure out the best ways to work through them.

 

Some songs make references to my loved ones and how they make me happy.

 

Other songs make reference to things that piss me off.

 

A common theme is being inundated with so much going on at once coupled with technology; trying to streamline so I can figure what the heck that’s bothering me.

 

The need and yearning in giving myself ample time to think.

 

Other themes are the difference in perceptions in people or even me. How the mind is working at a given moment. How the mind can play tricks on you; thought patterns which can affect human behaviour.

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Elaborate on your work and achievement so far in your music career.

Too early to tell – “Real to Me” is my debut album.

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Tell us your opinion on using rhymes dictionary or writing software to develop lyrics.

I see nothing wrong with using rhyme dictionaries. It’s not like you’ve never heard of these words you are pulling out. You just need to have access to these words when you need it. They are not always at the forefront of one’s mind.

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Discuss the music industry.

On a positive note – So many choices today as to what to listen to… So many genres – Many songs and artists are an amalgamation of genres.

 

Music listening today is fragmented – So many different vehicles to listen through. You have streaming services, Satellite radio -Sirius, cable TV radio, internet radio, traditional FM-AM, downloading and so on and so on.

 

Because of these different mediums, I feel it’s difficult for artists to dominate and appeal to the masses like they did when I grew up. It’s also difficult for them to have staying power. There are exceptions of course.  Back then, there wasn’t much choice in finding new music.

 

There was FM radio, MTV, VH1 and that’s it. I would read Rolling Stone and Spin magazine cover to cover. If I saw an artist get positive reviews from two different sources, I went out to Tower Records in the village after a night out with friends usually around midnight and bought those CDs. While I was there I would end up picking up some other artists and go deep into their catalogs. This was a once a week ritual.

 

I don’t feel there is one particular style that the masses are listening to…Very different from the 60s, 70s, 80s, 90s, 00s. It’s unlimited today.

 

People say rock n roll is not in favour today. I don’t believe that nor do I care. I’m going to listen to whatever I want whether people think it’s in favour or not. Incidentally, I have been finding plenty of new modern rock artists that I enjoy listening to.

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Elaborate on how you prepare yourself for a recording session.

When I’m in the studio, I make sure to eat a meal beforehand and I drink a lot of water.

 

Vocally, I take a good 15 -20 minutes of takes before my voice gets warmed up. I make sure not to strain. The voice will come with proper warming and a lot of abdominal breathing.

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Brief us on your preference in terms of tempo as in up-tempo, mid-tempo or slow tempo.

I prefer creating mid to up-tempo songs. In today’s fast-paced world where people lose interest quickly- I feel it’s appropriate.

 

I’m in a phase of high throttle guitar driven songs with some crunch which gets my blood flowing. Incorporate some celestial atmospherics and it sounds right to me at this point in time.

 

That’s not to say I do not like slow songs. I’m sure some slow songs will come – I’m just not there yet.

 

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