Asher Laub – Attention

Asher Laub – Attention

 

Asher Laub – Attention

Asher Laub – Attention

 

ARTIST NAME:  Asher Laub

 

SONG TITLE:  Attention

 

ALBUM TITLE: Attention

 

RELEASE DATE: 7.16.19

 

GENRE: Pop/Instrumental

 

ARTIST NAME:  Asher Laub

 

SONG TITLE:  Attention

 

ALBUM TITLE: Attention

 

RELEASE DATE: 7.16.19

 

GENRE: Pop/Instrumental

 

Website

 

Instagram

 

Twitter

 

Facebook

 

Bandcamp

 

Spotify

 

Reverbnation

 

Asher Laub  – Asher’s notable musical career began with classical violin training at the tender age of 2 – leading to his first formal concert with the Buffalo Philharmonic at 13.

 

Since then, Asher’s ability improvise across multiple genres has inspired an innovative career as a cutting-edge electric violinist.

 

Asher’s engaging solo performances have made him a co-headliner at iconic venues such as Madison Square Garden, Hammerstein Hall, Lincoln Center, and Carnegie Hall.

 

His diverse multicultural repertoire has garnered acclaim across four continents.

 

Asher’s high-energy concerts have been aired nationwide on PBS and made headlines on major media outlets such as CNN, WABC, NBC, and the New York Post.

 

In 2014, Asher lived a musician’s nightmare when he confronted health challenges that impacted his mobility. Refusing to accept defeat, he rebuilt his musical skills to a new level. This harrowing experience inspired him to reinvent himself as a dancing violinist.

 

In only a few months, Asher learned to merge hip hop, pop, EDM, rock, and other genres with breakdancing and acrobatic choreography.

 

His live performances now reflect his unstoppable spirit and joy!

 

With a growing fan base, Asher is working to influence societal norms and conventional thinking about musical performance, helping to break down social and physical barriers.

 

His latest single, Neon Dreams, released by Kobalt Music Group has been described as a “high-octane hit” and can be accessed on iTunes and all other major platforms. Asher is currently in the studio working on releasing his next original album.

.

.

.

 

Discuss how you develop your melody.

I try to start with a holistic view of where I want the song to go; rhythm, vibe, chord progression, etc.

 

I often produce the music while in my studio so that any crazy cool ideas that accidentally emerge are saved. That’s how I wrote ‘Neon Dreams.’

 

‘Attention’ was more of a focus on the popular cover, where I wanted to give a voice to the strings, focusing on the harmonies.

 

Each song requires a bit of a different approach, but a lot of the inspirational lines just sort of come out of nowhere.

.

.

.

 

Tell us your source of inspiration.

I’m inspired by innovative musicians like Vanessa Mae, David Garrett, Jean Luc Ponty and others who charted their own path, breaking away from the mainstream without losing those adoring fans.  This is a true indication of raw talent. I study these musicians and their work and merge it with other popular electronic artists. Classical, electronic, jazz and pop music are my main influences, at least for now.

.

.

.

 

Tell us the most memorable experience in your music career.

I’ve had quite a few, but co-headlining at Madison Square Garden a few years back, more recently at Master Theatre and, of course, Carnegie Hall were all unforgettable experiences that I’m proud to be a part of. There are videos of these concerts around the internet and on my YouTube channel.

.

.

.

 

Discuss how you build your song.

There’s no set formula, but I do start with the chord progression and rhythm before developing the solo. I try to stay true to what’s pleasant to the ear.  If the tune doesn’t sound clean, catchy, or melodic enough I rerecord it until it does. Once the rhythm and general texture of the music are complete I lay the strings so that the melody sounds full. The strings usually come last.

.

.

.

 

Tell us how you ensure your music inspires others.

I try to place myself in their shoes when I listen to my own music. I also run it by a bunch of close friends and family members before releasing it.

.

.

.

 

Discuss the relevance of promotion to the music business.

Promotion is pretty important if you want to go anywhere. You can have a great hit, but if you don’t promote it, people won’t hear it unless you have a supporting record label. None of these things are easy to do.

.

.

.

 

Tell us what you will do apart from music.

I have 3 degrees in the sciences, but I’m proud to say I’m now a full-time musician and have been for a few years now. I’m working nonstop, but it’s often rewarding when I get positive feedback from my fans.

.

.

.

 

List the names of the instruments you can play.

My trademark is a violin, but I also play drums, piano, guitar, mandolin, cello, and I DJ as well.

.

.

.

 

Tell us if you have any music background.

I have been trained to play the violin since age 2. Yes pretty intense, I thank my mother for that one.

.

.

.

 

Tell us the piece of advice you will give to a new artist on entering the music chart.

Produce great music and develop a fan base that enjoys that music to help you push your way up the charts.

.

.

.

 

Elaborate on melody and rhythm.

I’m a big fan of funk, and house rhythms as they lend themselves to that high energy vibe that I believe gives the violin a nice chance of being featured the way vocals are these days. Whether a melody is minor or major, I think it needs that rhythmic drive (bass, and drums) to carry people away…

.

.

.

 

State your future goals.

While I’m busy with corporate, and concert gigs, I’m working on building a tour for my upcoming album and my plan is to have a few more full time dedicated staff members to assist me with the daily logistics of social media and bookings so that I can focus 95% on my music and artist collaborations.

.

.

.

 

Share your recording experience with us.

I have recorded as a musician for orchestras, independent artists in rap, R&B, rock, and jazz, you name it.  I’m proud to have produced some great recordings for a nationwide airing on PBS alongside country starlet Jessica Lynn, which will be out in August 2019.

.

.

.

Tell us the most difficult part of the recording.

Getting that warm/sweet tone on the violin and having the final rendered product sound perfect to my ears.

.

.

.

Discuss the greatest mistake you have ever made in your music career.

Not seeking the right medical advice when my health started to tank a few years ago. Thankfully I regained my health but those were the scariest months of my life.

.

.

.

 

Tell us how you build up your composition.

As mentioned earlier, I like starting with chords, rhythm, and bass, then adding textures with other instruments and leaving the solo elements to the violin, unless it features vocals.

.

.

.

Discuss the relevance of music.

Music is completely relevant today, more than ever.  It’s used in theatre, to help people get through the daily grind; it serves as an indelible mark in the emotions of billions of people, representing different milestones. It’s a growing field in medical therapies. Music is core to my being, I couldn’t do without it.

.

.

.

 

Elaborate on the song.

‘Attention’ is a fun, mid-beat dance tune that has a strong focus on the bass and solo violins. The video depicts my dueling violinist style of performance which I do quite a bit throughout the year.

.

.

.

 

Elaborate on your artist name and the title of the album.

Asher Laub is my name and performance name. I stuck with it because there’s nobody else I’ve ever met with that name, and I like being unique.

 

Mobile Version

Kiana Ledé + Offset - Bouncin

Kiana Ledé + Offset – Bouncin

Kiana Ledé + Offset - Bouncin

Kiana Ledé + Offset – Bouncin

 

Kiana Ledé + Offset – Bouncin

 

Instagram

 

Facebook

 

Twitter

 

Website

 

Spotify

 

Apple Music

 

iTunes

 

Kiana Ledé – Born to a Mexican and Native American Self-raised mother, and an African American and Native American father, raised by the streets of Philly, the Arizona native spent her early years with little to no money throughout her early years, developing a sense of identity that fuels her art to this day.

 

Distracted at school, songs would play in her head as she spent countless hours honing her voice and learning guitar and piano.

 

She moved to Los Angeles by herself and fought hard to keep that career going.

Republic Records Co-Founder and Chief Executive Monte Lipman signed Kiana. Joining the roster, she released the 2018 debut EP, Selfless featuring her single “Ex.”

 

“I hope people feel the vulnerability and truth in my music and see it as something strong, I hope they find self-awareness and self-worth in my music.

 

I hope they hear my story and my struggles and find something to take away from it that makes them feel powerful. I want women to know that you can be vulnerable and strong—that you can be in control and not be taken advantage of.

 

Most importantly, I want everyone who hears my music to know that I am no victim. I am in control of my own destiny and path and I embrace all the flaws and mistakes I have made because they make up who I am.”

 

Offset

One-third of rap outfit Migos, Offset is a rapper whose speedy rhymes and love of interjections and clever wordplay made him a fan favourite as the trap trio ascended the hip-hop charts.

 

After breaking through with Migos, he branched off as a solo artist, collaborating with multiple artists and reaching chart highs with Tyga “Taste” and Kodak Black “Zeze” in 2018.

 

In early 2019, he issued his debut full-length, Father of 4.

Born Kiari Kendrell Cephus in Lawrenceville, Georgia, he formed a collective called Polo Club in 2009.

 

The following year, he formed Migos alongside Takeoff and his cousin Quavo.

 

The trio broke out of the underground when their track “Versace,” from the 2013 mixtape Young Rich N*ggas, became a widespread hit.

 

Offset released chart-topping studio albums with Migos, including 2017’s Culture and its follow-up, Culture II.

 

Without Warning, a collaboration with 21 Savage and Metro Boomin, appeared on Halloween of 2017 and hit the Top Five of the Billboard 200 album chart. The set featured his triple-platinum hit “Ric Flair Drip.”

Following a slew of guest appearances – including the multi-platinum Top Ten singles “Taste” with Tyga and “Zeze” with Kodak Black – Offset issued the single “Red Room,” which landed on his solo debut, Father of 4.

 

The album debuted at number four in the top 200 Billboard charts and spent another week in the Top Ten.

~ Rob Wacey & Neil Z. Yeung, Rovi

 

Mobile Version

Robert S Smith – Upendo

 

Robert S Smith – Upendo

 

Artist name: Robert S Smith (Solo Noi)

 

Song Title: Upendo

 

Album Title: Uno

 

Release Date: 14/2/2019

 

Genre: Jazz/Pop

 

Facebook

 

Spotify

 

Reverbnation

Website

 

CD Baby

 

 

Solo Noi are John Fitzsimons and Robert Smith.  Robert was with CBS Italy and had a big hit with “Too Much to Me” and John played with many bands including The Papers, Kan Kan releasing tracks on Radioactive Records.  Drawing on reggae and rock influences “How many More” became an indie success and having played many gigs, in places as varied as Ronnie Scotts to The Rock Garden, John has vast experience as a performer.

 

Solo Noi formed three years ago as an experimental project to combines pop, ballads rock and jazzy styles into something both John and Robert felt was both unique and accessible to audiences.  The album “Uno” is the result. Influences include van Morrison, Sting, and Steely Dan as the album weaves its way through reflections on love and life.  A key theme is that there is no such thing as a sell-by date for life… every day presents another opportunity for us all no matter how old we are or where we come from.

 

On the album, John plays guitar and is the main singer, while Robert is the keyboard player, arranger, and producer.

.

.

.

 

Discuss how you develop your melody.

We use the chord sequence and mood of the lyrics to move the melody towards the feeling of the song. So for example ‘A’ minor key songs might include a move into a relative major key melody if the lyric reaches a happy reflective memory.  We try to avoid melodic phrasing that is obvious.

.

.

.

 

State your sources of inspiration.

We often sit in coffee bars and just listen to conversations or observe people on their own, or guessing who they are and what has brought them here today. We also listen to many other artists to gain insight into how they interpret life and then adapt our ideas so that themes remain current.  Artistes we have listened to in particular are Tom Waites, The Doors, Amy Winehouse and Adele.

.

.

.

 

State the most memorable experience in your music career. Working with Elton John’s producer Gus Dudgeon…

.

.

.

 

Discuss how you build your songs. 

We record lots of production ideas and then begin the process of emptying out the song in the mix so that only the best ideas are kept and then gradually introduced as the song progresses.

.

.

.

 

Tell us how your music inspires others.

At gigs we often get people asking us about the unusual chord sequences we use – these go beyond the usual pop formulas even though sometimes it’s only a couple of chords being used.   We also have questions from radio DJs about the stories behind the lyrics that sometimes inspire others to use a similar approach.

.

.

.

Discuss the relevance of promotion to the music business.

Promotion is essential. Although it’s easier to get music distributed now there is a lot more competition and unless you promote relentlessly, you’ll get swamped by other artistes.  It takes about a year of good promotion to start getting noticed.

.

.

.

 

Tell us what you do apart from music.

I make films and do some volunteering to collect money for local charities. I also help to organize a local music festival once a year – which is not music … it’s just a lot of hard work! I also travel a lot in Europe – particularly fond of Prague, Berlin, and Copenhagen.  Bob likes to garden.

.

.

.

List the names of instruments you can play. 

Guitar, Bass, Bodhran, Keyboards, Tin Whistle, Congas, Mouth Organ…

.

.

.

Elaborate on your music background.

My family is Irish so there was always a lot of music going on when I was younger. My dad sang at weddings and played the mouth organ.  I have had no formal musical training, but I played in bands from 18 onwards and had my first record deal when I was 25.

 

Bob has trained in music and can orchestrate, read and write as well as play keyboards. He’s Italian and also had a lot of music in his childhood. He was signed to CBS Italy for a while and had a top 10 hit in Europe.

.

.

.

 

Tell us the piece of advice you would give a new artist on entering the music chart.

This is the beginning – you might think you have made it but the hard work starts now – don’t think it will all start to build from here – it won’t unless you keep working at it.

.

.

.

Elaborate on Melody and Rhythm.

There are no rules except to remember who your audience is and what you want them to feel.  Don’t copy your favourite artists – use them for inspiration but you need to find your own sound and style.

 

Avoid simply singing a melody that changes as the chord changes – make the lyrical change in the middle of the chord, not the end.

.

.

.

 

State your future goals.

We are working on our second album while we promote the first one.  We aim to have this ready next year to follow up where ever the promotion gets us then.  We aim to move towards international festival appearances by next year.

.

.

.

 

Share your recording experience with us.

I’ve worked at Maison Rouge Studios in London and Bob recorded at the Townhouse.

 

Now we do most of these ourselves using a DAW and a live studio for acoustic instruments.  Good recording takes a lot of planning and time – we never rush our work – sometimes one track can take a month to get right. The first album took us three years.

.

.

.

 

Tell us the most difficult part of the recording. 

Recording vocals is the hardest part.  This is because the song needs to express emotion not just being technically competent, and that mainly comes from the vocal.

 

Sometimes you can record a vocal that is not quite right in terms of the pitch but is still the best because it captures the emotion.

Perfection is not always the aim when singing and it’s often hard to recognize that.

.

.

.

 

Discuss the greatest mistake you ever made in your music career

Signing a production deal that tied me into a contact for 10 years –  It was supposed to lead to a recording deal but it never did and the company refused to release us – so no other company could offer us a deal.

.

.

.

 

Tell us how you build your composition.

Usually, this starts with a chord sequence that captures a mood or a story narrative.  Then lyrics follow but are then edited perhaps twenty times before they are finalized.  By then the chords may have changed also.  Some songs arrive fully formed in twenty minutes while others take a lot more work. The twenty-minute songs are often the best because they capture a moment while others can be a struggle to retain a focus.  We usually scrap three times as many songs as we eventually use.

.

.

.

 

Discuss the relevance of music.

Travel around the world and you’ll find people everywhere making music.  It’s a universal language that most people understand and it invites us all to share that across national boundaries. These days that is very relevant to how we view each other on the planet.  I’ve played music with people from across the globe and it has made me a better musician and a much broader person.

.

.

.

 

Elaborate on the themes of most of your songs. 

A lot of our songs are narrative-based – so they tell a simple story – maybe someone at a party meets a potential partner which does not work out.  We also write from a perspective of beyond observation – so for example about feelings transferred between people, sometimes without them knowing.

.

.

.

 

Elaborate on your artist name and album title. 

Solo Noi means “just us” in Italian.  We wanted to keep things simple but we could not use ‘Just Us’ as it was already copyrighted.  So as Bob is part Italian, and we wanted to attract an international audience, we chose Solo Noi.  The first album is called UNO.  That’s “one” in Italian.

 

Mobile Version

Giggs + Labrinth - Don't Go Hungry

Giggs + Labrinth – Don’t Go Hungry

 

Giggs + Labrinth - Don't Go Hungry

Giggs + Labrinth – Don’t Go Hungry

 

Giggs + Labrinth – Don’t Go Hungry

 

Website

 

Facebook

 

Twitter

 

Instagram

 

iTunes

 

Apple Music

 

Amazon

 

Spotify

 

Giggs is one of the finest rappers from the UK. His delivery of rap verses is amazing.

 

One of the MCs to receive Drake’s patronage during the Canadian’s 2017 🇬🇧 love-in, his fifth studio album has a cross-Atlantic guest list that hints at broader ambitions.

 

In less credible hands, this could feel like a calculated lurch, but it’s Giggs we’re dealing with: His US guests are in his house to play by his rules.

 

This means we get Jadakiss patrolling Peckham with menace on “MIC CHECK,” Lil Yachty battling the baleful, gothic production of “NOSTALGIA,” and, best of all, Swizz Beatz trying to wrest control of the glorious anarchy of “TERMINATOR.”

 

With that dexterous flow both thunderous and playful, Giggs himself has never sounded better, hungrier, or more relaxed. He’s put together a record that feels important—beyond the UK.

 

Myles Whittingham directed the official video for ‘Don’t Go Hungry’ taken from the new album ‘BIG BAD.’

 

Giggs is a British rapper who made his acclaimed solo album debut in 2008 with ‘Walk in da Park.’

 

Born Nathan Thompson in 1985 and hailing from Peckham, South London, he is affiliated with the group SN1 and is known as Hollowman.

 

His backstory includes a two-year prison sentence for gun charges.

 

Following many mixtape releases and a much-touted freestyle called “Talking the Hardest,” Giggs made his full-length solo debut in 2008 with the released album Walk in da Park.

 

Later in the year, he won the 2008 BET Award for Best U.K. Act, beating out popular favourites Dizzee Rascal and Chip.

 

He signed a recording contract with XL Recordings and made preparations to release his major-label album debut, Let Em Ave It, in 2010.

 

Returning three years later, Giggs released his follow-up, When Will It Stop, in 2013, which saw him working with the likes of Ed Sheeran, Anthony Hamilton, and Styles P.

 

Giggs returned in 2016 with his lauded third studio album Landlord, which reached number two on the U.K. Album Chart.

 

After appearing on a pair of Drake tracks in early 2017, Giggs followed up with the Wamp 2 Dem mixtape in October of that year.

~ Jason Birchmeier, Rovi

 

Mobile Version

CLiQ + Caitlyn Scarlett + Kida Kudz + Double S – Dance on the Table

CLiQ – Dance on the Table

 

 

 

 

 

 

CLiQ + Caitlyn Scarlett + Kida Kudz + Double S – Dance on the Table

CLiQ + Caitlyn Scarlett + Kida Kudz + Double S – Dance on the Table

 

 

 

CLiQ + Caitlyn Scarlett + Kida Kudz + Double S – Dance on the Table

 

Instagram

 

Website

 

Facebook

 

Twitter

 

Deezer

 

Amazon

 

Spotify

 

Apple Music

 

iTunes

 

Following on from infectious hit ‘Wavey’ – DJ and producer duo CLiQ team up with pop, Afrobeat and grime talents on a brand new single ‘Dance on the Table.’

 

Robin M and Max Reich are the two experienced London based DJ producers making up house crossover production duo, CLiQ.

 

Injecting a fresh attitude into their music, friendship lies at the core of their working relationship allowing them to craft unique and distinctive music.

 

Shooting to prominence back in 2018 with their instant hit single ‘Wavey’, today sitting at over fifty million streams across all DSP’s, the track grabbed the attention of supporters on and off the dance floor; gaining instant kudos from BBC Radio 1, which made “Wavey” record of the week.

 

CLiQ also received support from shows including Mistajam’s Radio 1 Dance Anthems, Pete Tong and club outings with the likes of David Guetta, Martin Garrix, Oliver Heldens, The Magician, Felix Da Housecat and Roger Sanchez.

 

It is without a doubt that CLiQ have the innate ability to muscle up killer melodies and bass-heavy hooks.

 

They now team up with emerging talent, Caitlyn Scarlett, Nigerian Afrobeat innovator, Kida Kudz and Grime star, Double S; presenting a brand new and infectious single ‘Dance On The Table’.

 

With a proven ability to apply her charming and angelic vocals for maximum effect, 2018 was a big year for Caitlyn Scarlett. Featuring as BBC Introducing’s ‘Record Of The Week’ throughout the summer with released single ‘Ornaments’. Joining the team fresh off the back of a collaboration with Grime Royalty, Skepta is Double S who adds a slick verse, along with that of Nigerian Afrobeat star, Kida Kudz.

 

Unified in flow, both Double S and Kida Kudz bring licks of attitude to the urban infused pop track which will populate the national airwaves and feature high in club and dance playlists…

 

Mobile Version

Erin Gibney - July

Erin Gibney – July

 

Erin Gibney - July

Erin Gibney – July

 

ARTIST NAME: Erin Gibney

 

SONG TITLE:  July

 

ALBUM TITLE: July

 

RELEASE DATE: 7/1/19

 

GENRE: Country

 

Facebook

 

Twitter

 

Instagram

 

Apple Music

 

iTunes

 

Spotify

 

CD Baby

 

Reverbnation

 

Website

 

Coming from New England, Erin Gibney puts a new and refreshing spin on country music.

 

She has been performing since she was 11 years old and came to Nashville in September 2016 to record the beginning 2 songs in her first album.

 

After falling in love with the city, she decided to move to Nashville this year to be closer to the studio and producer helping to make her music possible.

 

Along with singing live around Nashville, Gibney worked hard on her debut album, BOLD, which was released on April 12th, 2018.

 

Gibney has had the incredible honour of working alongside well-known and respected Nashville musicians under the guidance of her producer, Buddy Hyatt, for this album.

 

These Grammy and CMA winning musicians include Brent Mason, Bobby Terry, Zach Allen, Wayne Killius, Duncan Mullins, Scott Sanders, Hale White, and Buddy Hyatt himself.

 

Gibney now is excited to introduce her newest single, July.

.

.

.

 

Tell us what your fans are saying about your music.

My fans have called my latest music, “beautiful and poetic.” Words like these are such incredible compliments to receive and I am so thankful for everyone’s positive feedback.

.

.

.

Tell us the factors you consider in choosing a song as your favourite.

Lyrics are a huge factor when choosing a song as my favourite. I love hearing an artist’s story put to music.

.

.

.

Tell us the names of producers you will collaborate with if you have the chance.

I currently love working with my producer, Buddy Hyatt, in Nashville. I would love to also work with people like Jay Joyce, Maren Morris, and Chris Stapleton.

.

.

.

 

Tell us the names of the songwriters you will collaborate with if you have the chance.

I would love to work and write with Shane McAnally and Josh Osborne.

.

.

.

 

Tell us your favourite TV show and state your reason.

‘Friends’ is by far my favourite television show because it always keeps me in a good mood and laughing.

.

.

.

 

Tell us your best mood to create a song.

I think I am most creative when I’m confused or conflicted. I always find the answers to my problems when I’m forming them into a song.

.

.

.

 

Tell us your interpretation of fame or success.

I think fame and success are very different things. Fame is when people know your name, but success is when you leave a lasting, positive impact on those people.

.

.

.

Tell us the names of artists you will collaborate with if you have the chance.

I would love to collaborate with Bruce Springsteen, Kelsea Ballerini, Maren Morris, Gavin DeGraw, Keith Urban, and Carrie Underwood.

.

.

.

Tell us about your experience performing on stage for the first time or recording in the studio for the first time.

The first time I ever recorded in a recording studio was a life-changing moment for me. I was 17 and recording my first ever single. I remember hearing my music come alive over my headphones and I was overcome with joy and awe. The experience has motivated me to keep creating music for people to enjoy.

.

.

.

 

Tell us how you approach songwriting.

I approach songwriting like I would if I was writing a story about my life. I put my experiences onto paper and organize them to fit a melody.

.

.

.

Tell us your opinion on blending genres or experimenting with sound.

I love the idea of blending genres and experimenting with sound. Artists should feel free to create music even if it doesn’t fit their current genre.

.

.

.

 

Tell us how you deal with rejection.

I see rejection as an opportunity to grow. Taking people’s constructive criticism is the only way to grow as a writer and person.

.

.

.

Elaborate on what compels you to sing.

I sing because music is a way to unite people. I think to be a part of something that influential is really beautiful.

.

.

.

Tell us the comparison between digital recording and analog recording.

Digital recordings are great because they can be archived forever on a computer or device. Analog is a great option because you’re receiving your music in its physical form.

.

.

.

 

Tell us how you record your vocals.

I record my vocals in the studio.

.

.

.

Tell us the software you used mostly for recording.

I use ProTools when recording for the most part.

.

.

.

Discuss the selling of CDs and selling of digital files through digital stores.

The selling of CDs and digital files both have their benefits. Selling CDs gives the artist a reasonable profit while selling digital files reaches a larger audience.

.

.

.

Elaborate on the song.

‘July’ is a song about finding love in the heat of the summer. It is soft, sweet, and melodic as the music takes the listener through a story of falling in love.

.

.

.

 

Elaborate on your artist name and the title of the album.

My name is Erin Gibney, my given name, and my song, “July,” is my new summer single.

.

.

.

 

Share your press release and review with us.

Country Singer/ Songwriter, Erin Gibney Announces New Summer Single, June 28th, 2019Nashville, Tennessee

 

Following the release of her March single, King of Hearts, Erin Gibney puts out a refreshing song about young love (out 6/28/19).

 

The lyrics run through a story of falling in love in the heat of summer, a theme much different from Gibney’s past music.

 

While the singer usually writes of heartbreak, lyrics in her new single, July, are uniquely lighter. She sings, “I thought ‘this is forever, you and me together…’” and “he sleeps so purely in the light of a summer morning.”

 

Erin Gibney is a country singer/songwriter from New England who moved to Nashville in 2017. Upon her move, Gibney attended Belmont University as a Music Business major and worked on her debut EP, Bold.

 

She has auditioned for television shows such as NBC The Voice, American Idol, and America’s Got Talent.

Gibney’s love for performing drove her to sing in places like Douglas Corner and Puckett’s Grocery and Restaurant.

‘July’ is a song about finding a selfless and unconditional love. She takes the listener through a story of her infatuation with a boy, using words like, “God, I’m so in love.”

 

Mobile Version

Gordon Thomson – Here I Go Again

Gordon Thomson – Here I Go Again

 

Gordon Thomson – Here I Go Again

Gordon Thomson – Here I Go Again

 

ARTIST NAME: Gordon Thomson

 

SONG TITLE: Here I Go Again

 

RELEASE DATE:  9th of July 2019

 

Spotify

 

CD Baby

 

Apple Music

 

iTunes

Facebook

 

 

 

Tell us your definition of being a talented artist.

Talent – persistence, dedication, the love of music and the belief in your own ability.

.

.

.

 

Describe how you get involved in music.

I have been playing guitar and writing music since I was 10 years old and have never fallen out of love with its creation.

My first recording was a birthday present. One day in a recording studio and the excitement of recording has never left me!

.

.

.

 

Tell us if you are a starter or an established artist at the moment.

I am not a starter but a long term developing musician and I never stop learning!

.

.

.

 

Elaborate on the themes of most of your songs.

The themes of my songs are mostly about relationships, reactions, to being part of or the consequences of them but when a subject sparks my imagination then I go with it.

.

.

.

Tell us your opinion on old music and new music in terms of preference.

Inspiring music is what excites me and taking ideas from all forms.

.

.

.

State your greatest performance.

My greatest performance was in a church hall in my home town and one of my very first gigs of my first album. I had the whole audience in the palm of my hand and at the end everyone just got up and sang along with the title track of the album and it was incredible!

.

.

.

 

Tell us the greatest mistake to avoid while recording a song.

The biggest mistake when recording is to know when to stop! Less is usually more like any artist; one of the greatest talents is to know when to put down your brush etc. and say that’s ENOUGH!

.

.

.

 

Tell us your definition of a hit song.

Hit song – short and sweet with recognisable empathy and something universal to lock onto instantly.

.

.

.

 

Tell us what you know about your fans.

My fans are diverse fickle but loyal if you recognise their worth. I love the fact I have any at all and I appreciate every single one of them and I only wish I could thank everyone personally

.

.

.

 

Describe your mood during recording or performance.

When recording I have my creative head on but I am always open to instant ideas and to try and bring out the very best in myself and very conscious of the help I can get from people around me.

.

.

.

 

Discuss your songwriting.

Songwriting for me is to create and destroy, build and breakdown, play over and over and change what doesn’t work to that which does tweak, tailor, mould, clarify and perfect then say that is ENOUGH.

.

.

.

 

Discuss your recording process.

Recording is a world of my own complete control and an instinct as to what works…

.

.

.

 

Discuss how you experiment with different sounds.

I tend not to be out of control with sounds when recording but I am continually seeking the sound I have perfected in my head and never quite get; one day I will achieve nirvana but until then I will keep playing around with sound until I say ENOUGH.

.

.

.

 

Elaborate on your artist name.

My name is Gordon Thomson and I would have loved to have created a better name for myself but it’s who I am.

.

.

.

 

Elaborate on multi-genre music.

To me, multi-genre music is simply taking influences from other forms of music and adapting them to suit one. And to me, they have no bounds just as music has no bounds. Interpret it as you wish with what you wish with who you wish and in any combination. You have to wear blinkers not to be influenced as a musician by other forms and I prefer not to even pigeon hole my music but it always annoys me when asked what type of music is yours? Who do you sound like? Etc.

 

Listen and make your own mind up – like a painting; read into its landscape what you want and if you identify with it great, if you don’t, move on and listen to something else!

.

.

.

 

Tell us how to develop a lyric to a full song.

My ideas come often out of the blue with just hearing a line of a song or a spoken word or even a mood brought on by a conversation or a thought.

 

My songs go through stages of rough drafts played over and worked on; especially the lyrics.

 

Most of my songs are dictated by the lyrics…and the simplest way to get over the message without too much effort.

.

.

.

Tell us how you come up with a melody.

The melody fits the feeling I get when I read my lyrics on the page or simply sometimes doodling with an acoustic guitar.

 

In my opinion a good song should be a journey as long as it says something to the listener that they can identify with and easily understand, but sometimes it can simply be a soundscape you can listen to as you look at a painting and take it in, absorb it and enjoy the way it makes you feel.

.

.

.

Tell us how you impact your listeners with your songs.

The impact of my song generally is on an emotional level as the song’s lyrics often take you on a journey sometimes with a story that has meaning sometimes profound but often just good narrative…

.

.

.

 

Tell us how you relate with producers and music directors.

I direct and produce my own music and I am happy to do so but I often collaborate with people I respect when recording my music as they often influence the way in which some songs will go…

.

.

.

Tell us what you will change in your music.

I change all the time. I develop, create and am moved by my desire to get better and be satisfied.

.

.

.

 

Tell us what is special about this release.

This is my latest album and it is my best work simply because it has been the most fulfilling and satisfying.

.

.

.

 

Tell us your best means of expression.

My music is my creative outlet and that’s what I simply want to carry on doing. I want to put aside the dogma of disappointment, the agony of inadequacy and the frustration of what the creative endeavour unfolds.

 

Mobile Version

Jake Exavier – Upside Down

Jake Exavier – Upside Down

 

Jake Exavier – Upside Down

Jake Exavier – Upside Down

 

ARTIST NAME: Jake Exavier

 

SONG TITLE: Upside Down

 

RELEASE DATE: June 12, 2019

 

GENRE: R&B/Pop

 

Facebook

 

Twitter

 

Instagram

 

Apple Music

 

iTunes

 

Spotify

Website

 

At 21 years old, Jake Exavier is a bona fide, gifted singer/ songwriter, the likes of which we haven’t heard in a while.

 

His style is best described as a throwback, old school vibe with an urban edge. Along with his skillful lyricism, Jake’s hooks and harmonies resonate with a diverse audience.

 

Growing up in Zachary, Louisiana, Jake developed a love for music at an early age, and even as a young child, music has always been his top priority.

 

Jake Exavier’s primary influences are Usher, Chris Brown, D’Angelo and John Legend.

 

His goal is to create music that people can feel. In 2014, at 16 years old, he performed and twice won first place at the Apollo Theater.

 

Jake is currently working on new music and looking forward to using his sultry vocals to present fresh songs that everyone can relate to.

.

.

.

 

Discuss your singing ability.

I was told I sing well and have a good voice at a young age.

.

.

.

 

Tell us the reason you want to sing.

I like writing songs and telling relationship stories through song.

.

.

.

 

Tell us your most memorable live performance.

The House Of Blues performance in New Orleans.

.

.

.

 

Discuss how you build your song.

After I hear the music track, I connect through hearing a melody and words that connect with my current state of mind.

.

.

.

 

Tell us how you impress your fans with your music.

I impress them by singing songs that they can relate to.

.

.

.

 

Discuss the relevance of promotion to the music business.

You must promote to get the awareness of your singing and songs released to the public such as your community.

.

.

.

 

Tell us what you will do apart from music.

I want to get involved with Burn Victims Foundations. I also would like to get into acting.

.

.

.

 

List the names of the instruments you can play.

My voice is my instrument. I also play the trombone.

.

.

.

 

Tell us if you have any music background.

I sang in my high school choir, performed in musicals and played the trombone.

.

.

.

 

Tell us the piece of advice you will give to a new artist on entering the music chart.

Get ready to work socially and ready to perform a lot!

.

.

.

 

Elaborate on melody and rhythm.

The melody I choose to write words to determines the rhythm for me.

.

.

.

 

State your future goals.

To get into acting, tour and continue writing songs for other artists.

.

.

.

 

Tell us the most difficult part of the recording.

Getting the right sound level of the microphone…

.

.

.

Discuss the greatest mistake you have ever made in your music career.

Not checking the reference of my first manager.

.

.

.

 

Discuss the relevance of the lyrics to the listeners.

To believe in falling in love.

.

.

.

 

Elaborate on the song.

‘Upside Down’ is about being in love that changes you for the better.

.

.

.

Elaborate on your artist name and the title of the album.

Jake (Exavier) is a middle name given to me by a fan I rode a bus with because I told him in conversation I didn’t have one.

 

I name my songs by what I’m saying the most; like the word “Upside Down.”

 

Mobile Version

Witold Suryn – Arpetition

 

Witold Suryn – Arpetition

 

ARTIST NAME: Witold Suryn

 

SONG TITLE: Arpetition

 

ALBUM TITLE: 34 Dance St.

 

RELEASE DATE: 2019-04-08

 

GENRE: Electronic/Contemporary Jazz

 

Apple Music

 

iTunes

 

Spotify

 

Website

 

Witold Suryn is a Canadian composer, pianist, bassist, and music producer.

 

Formally educated in music (piano) he composes music for over 40 years, first in jazz, then in contemporary symphonic and movie scores genre.

 

In addition to his formal musical education and years of composition practice in classical music, he gathered considerable experience in movie scoring for the contemporary film industry.

 

In his work, he cooperated with several young North American and British directors scoring their short and mid-length productions.

 

Independently he continuously composes music for cinema or TV productions, releases albums in symphonic, jazz and recently in electronic genres.

.

.

.

Narrate your experience while recording in the studio or while touring.

I record all in my studio. If I write jazz scores all are practically live recorded, my instruments are directly connected to my DAW with no use of microphones, so at least one problem is avoided, the background noises.

 

I play most of the instruments and eventually add final drums later.

 

When I have other musicians participating; they either come to my studio and I am a recording engineer or I send the project and they record their parts with their DAWs and send me the material to be used in mixing.

 

When it comes to cinematic or symphonic scores the process is different – I write notes on staves, sometimes record them live, but still, the process resembles the classical composition with partition and pen, except partition resides in notation software and mouse is a pen. Once the composition is finished it goes to DAW where “recording” takes place, i.e. MIDI data is sent to libraries and the resulting audio is recorded in situ.

 

Live recording, when there are no mikes used, is relatively straight forward when the studio has a decent audio interface, powerful enough computer and proper DAW software.

 

Recording in loops, comping and some other smart technical tricks shorten the recording time but may make the mixing time considerably longer.

.

.

.

Discuss your songwriting.

Being a piano player with formal musical education I use it as a tool, not as a set of rigid rules. So the music builds itself as I hear it, no matter whether it builds following the craft rules or against them.

 

My composition process follows what I hear, sometimes I have a complete vision of what I will write, and sometimes it resembles building the stairs when I figure out what the next step will be just before finishing the actual one. But one thing remains constant, the need for telling the story. Without it, my music would have no soul.

 

Being of an old school I use notes, partitions, and piano as a basic set of tools, but to create the sound I use notation software, many different instrument libraries and later in the process the mixing and mastering capabilities of my studio.

.

.

.

 

Elaborate on your future projects.

Future goals are the same as the present ones: compose music and make it reach people. Make them like it, or hate it, but never bore them.

 

And, if possible, have my music played by others.

.

.

.

 

Tell us what you are doing to increase your fan base.

I work with several publishing houses, a few distributors and radio stations.

 

For now, working with radio gives the best and the fastest results.

.

.

.

Tell us that point in time you wanted to give up on your music career.

Actually, it never happened; I only had to decide off what I want to make a living. In my times making a living out of music meant either being a professional musician, in my case a professional pianist, or playing a popular genre of music. Nothing appealed to me, so I decided to keep the music free from the obligation of feeding me and chose other domain as the source of income. This decision gave me the freedom of creation and freedom to say “no” when requested options were not to my liking.

.

.

.

Go into detail on how you make your instrumentation or melody.

The two of them are closely linked and interdependent. Melody goes with the choice of musical message to be conveyed, orchestration is a conveyer.

 

For example, when composing a piece of my More Cities Trilogy, Auberge Under the Wild Bear that takes place in Swiss Alps I chose, besides of classic symphonic orchestra setup the instruments that easily go with the type of music played in this region, an accordion, a solo tuba, a bass drum, a fiddle, a solo trumpet (or cornet) and a human voice able to yodel. Such a setup would be useless if I decided to compose a rock song.

 

In other words, a melody is a story; the instrumentation is the language you tell the story with. Both of them need to be chosen properly if the message is to pass.

.

.

.

 

State your favourite genre of music.

In this order: cinematic scores, symphonic orchestral pieces, jazz.

.

.

.

 

Tell us the theme of most of your songs.

There is no such thing like “theme of most of my songs”. Every piece I have ever composed or will compose has its own story to tell and they are never the same.

.

.

.

 

Elaborate on this song.

“Arpetition” is an attempt to mix jazz, electronica, and a little bit easier listening into one, digestible piece.

.

.

.

 

Tell us your opinion on self-training and enrolling in an educational institution to study music.

Music is a complex and delicate matter with bigger power of influence than we dare admit. This is why I am of the opinion that both proper education and intelligent practice, or, if you will, the self-training is necessary to create something of value.

 

Today’s technology gave into hands of pretty much everyone tools to build meaningful sequences of sounds, but is it “music”?

 

The DJ’s creation of dull bass pumping is definitely a good start for a disco where people dance, but would we go to a concert hall to listen to it? I have my doubts. No matter the genre all of them have their fans, listeners and followers, so they are necessary, but not all of them require music education to exist. But again, Mozart will be remembered forever while DJ X will go to oblivion next season.

.

.

.

 

State your artist’s name and elaborate on it.

My artist name is my real name and I like it that way.

.

.

.

 

State the title of the song and the meaning.

“Arpetition” is a “mission statement” for this piece. The name is built as a combination of two words: arpeggio and repetition. The listener will easily find that there is a lot of both in the music.

.

.

.

 

State the title of the album and the reason for choosing the title.

The album title, “34 Dance St.” comes from the title of its first piece. The title piece is in 3/4 Metrum with several danceable moments despite being entirely jazz, so 34 Dance St. seemed more than adequate for the title of the piece and the album.

 

Mobile Version