X

Onism E – Love You More

Onism E – Love You More

ARTIST NAME: Onism E

SONG TITLE: Love You More

RELEASE DATE: 8/29/2019

GENRE: Indie Rock/Rock

Facebook

Twitter

Instagram

Apple Music

iTunes

Spotify

CD Baby

Reverbnation

Bandcamp

Website

Onism E is New York City’s newest indie rock band. From singer/songwriter Eline Chavez, this new project comes after an extended hiatus from the tour scene to further craft and develop her production skills.

After a few years of embedding herself in the production side of the music scene, she is finally back and ready to tell the story of those years out of the public eye.

Known for being a workhorse in the indie music scene, Eline continues to develop her unique and ever-evolving style with Onism E. Rooted in rock music; this is a combination of her alt-rock style and newfound love of moody and often dark melodies.

This straightforward rock project is headed by the always-evolving Eline Chavez. A rocker strapped with a guitar, she plans on taking Onism E to new heights with the release of “Love You More” on August 29, 2019.

Similar to the alternative wave that ushered in the likes of Liz Phair during the early ’90s, Onism E presents a wonderful blend of that and modern rock that results in a stellar rock track that could fare well on a playlist nestled in between Sharon Van Etten and 1975.

“Love You More” is just the latest from Onism E. Working on all new singles throughout 2019, Onism E has already dropped three (“Stay,” “Let You Go,” and “Fairytales”) with “Love You More” being the fourth on August 29. Along with the single comes a new video as well.

On top of new music, fans can also get to know Onism E a little better with a new series inspired by questions that kept coming in via Instagram. Fans can be on the lookout for the Onism E “Ask Me Anything” series to start in early September.

New York City-based rocker Onism E combines grit and soul on new single and video for “Love You More.”

.

.

.

Tell us what your fans are saying about your music.

Well, I have gotten everything from “it made me cry but thank you” to “it’s the kind of song that pulls you in and you have to hear it loudly because you hear something new every single time.” It’s all been really positive.

.

.

.

Tell us the factors you consider in choosing a song as your favourite.

It has to make me feel something or take me back somewhere; good or bad, it has to leave a mark.

.

.

.

Tell us the names of producers you will collaborate with if you have the chance.

That’s easy! I would love to get a chance to work with Linda Perry and Rick Rubin.

.

.

.

Tell us the names of the songwriters you will collaborate with if you have the chance.

Sharon Van Etten, Jade Bird, Bishop Briggs, Dave Grohl, LP, Sia, Chrissie Hynde and we are total opposites but we are both Cali kids so I would love to work with Sara Bareilles. I’d love to see what kind of music would come of sitting in a studio with her for a couple of days.

.

.

.

Tell us your favourite TV show and state your reason.

Right now, I love Million Dollar listing. I love NYC and I love seeing the city that way. I’m a huge foodie and they are always eating on the show so I take notes. Ha.

.

.

.

Tell us your best mood to create a song.

It’s not so much a mood as it is a reason. I tend to write about people and events so I write when something really hits me for a good or bad reason.

.

.

.

Tell us your interpretation of fame or success.

Well, success is more important to me than fame. Success is having the ability to play, record while making a good living doing it. Success is having that solid following that will download the music and go to the shows.

.

.

.

Tell us the names of artists you will collaborate with if you have the chance.

Sharon Van Etten, Jade Bird, Bishop Briggs, Dave Grohl, LP, Sia, Chrissie Hynde, and Sara Bareilles.

.

.

.

Tell us about your experience performing on stage for the first time or recording in the studio for the first time.

One of my first shows with a band was at a place called Ruta Maya Coffee House in Austin, Texas. It was located on 4th street at the time and I was primarily an acoustic guitar player at the time.

I was still really shy back then but determined to get out there and play.  I remember that I didn’t look up much while I played.

I just remember that when we started, there were a handful of people there and a couple of friends. Then about two songs into a 5-songs set, my drummer said, “Hey, look up.” That’s when I knew that I was right and that I needed to keep playing and writing.

I looked up and found that it was standing room only and people were standing outside looking and listening to us. It was pretty crazy.

.

.

.

Tell us how you approach songwriting.

I typically write from a very personal place. I try to be honest. I find that in being somewhat “exposed” people relate. Hurt, joy, and sorrow…They are all universal so as long as I stay real in my writing, I’m good.

.

.

.

Tell us your opinion on blending genres or experimenting with sound.

I think any time you open yourself to different genres; you are more likely to find that little something that sets you or a song apart.

I have come to love loops for instance and you can hear some of it in the song “Stay” that came out earlier this year. They are all forms of expression and have merit so bring it on! What I will say though, is that regardless of what genre you are playing…If you can’t strip it back to an acoustic set, you probably won’t find me playing it…

.

.

.

Tell us how you deal with rejection.

It’s life. It’s part of the music industry. You just have to keep going. There will always be people who don’t like what you do but you can’t make everyone happy so keep on keeping on.

.

.

.

Elaborate on what compels you to sing.

I hope that I am able to do what songwriters I listen to, do for me. If I can make just one person feel less lonely or scared, then I did a good thing. Music is powerful that way.

.

.

.

Tell us the comparison between digital recording and analog recording.

I have done both and what I will say is there are benefits to both and I have blended the two but ultimately, it’s what you do with those tracks that matters. You could have the best tracks with the best groove and ruin them in the mix.

.

.

.

Tell us how you record your vocals.

Well, I am super picky. Ha. Typically, I run through the entire song and try to get it all in one take. That’s my preferred method; 20-25 takes for a song was really commonplace when I first started working by myself. It has to be from the heart otherwise you can tell.

.

.

.

Tell us the software you used mostly for recording.

Pro Tools and Logic – I will draft a song on Logic and if two days later I still like it, I’ll go back and really spend some time on it with my Pro Tools rig.

.

.

.

Discuss the selling of CDs and selling of digital files through digital stores.

CDs are good for signing so I try to always have something on hand to sell at shows.

The greatness of digital is that it makes music accessible to everyone. For indie artists, that’s great because a person in Arizona can instantly tell their friend in Toronto that they just heard the coolest band. It’s good and bad. Good because they know you now, bad because streaming isn’t as profitable as CD sales. Ultimately all plays are good plays regardless of how.

.

.

.

Elaborate on the song.

It’s about a friend I lost not long ago. I started writing it when he was still alive. I wanted him to have it available on the bad days. Bad days I knew occurred more often than good ones because of who he was to others.

To me, he was smart, funny, talented, and just a beautiful soul but the entire world seem to see was that he was transgender. His family disowned him so when I found out that he had taken his life, I wasn’t surprised. I wish I could say I was but I wasn’t. He tried to hide his pain but I could see it in his eyes. In the end, the ugly of the world took his beautiful smile and the joy he brought to so many including me. I miss him every day.

.

.

.

Elaborate on your artist name and the title of the album.

Onism is the frustration of being stuck in one place knowing that you could be anywhere else. That’s me in a nutshell. I love to travel and I wish I could be everywhere for some days.

Love You More is the title of the song and it’s one of two songs that I recorded with a full band in Texas.

Mobile Version

Kolade Olamide: I am a poet , writer, beat maker, chef, songwriter, web designer, music promoter,digital marketer, blogger and director.