The Penthouse

Tell us what you know about music royalties and how to get paid.

We know that you absolutely have to copyright your work as soon as you create it. It’s also a good idea to register with a performance rights organization such as ASCAP or BMI. That way, any money that’s made from streaming will go where it’s due.

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Brief us on how to impress fans during a live performance. 

We put a lot of our focus into the sounds we’re using on stage that’ll resonate with the fans and give a completely unique version of the songs aside from the MP3 recordings. We do anything we can to throw things in our set that will constantly keep the attention of the audience. Everyone loves some phat bass haha.

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List the names of your biggest supporters. 

Our biggest supporters have been our parents, our manager Anthony Carraturo, and every fan that goes out of their way to be at every show.

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Discuss what has motivated you so far in your music career.

Nothing has been more motivating than the feedback we get from shows and the new music we put out. It’s also very motivating to see much more established bands performing because it’s a reminder that anything is possible. We’re also in a very interesting time for music where it’s okay to try new and “weird” sounds so that’s cool.

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Go into detail about your experience as an artist.

Being an artist now can entail so many things because you become responsible for every aspect of your music career. As a band, our strong point is creating music and making sure we can keep creating but then we have to manage social media, bookings, budgeting, publicity…etc. At that point we decided it’d be a good idea to have a manager so that we can keep focusing on the actual artistic side of things. It’s way more freeing for the mind when you can sit down and create without worrying about the other stuff.

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Tell us the greatest mistake you have ever made in your music career.

Probably rushing a recording process.

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Discuss the story behind the song.

The song “Best Friend” is about falling in love with your best friend even though it’s such a forbidden thing. It’s a true story and it happened a couple years back when one of us was struggling over the idea of being in love with one’s best friend. We constantly get asked who the song is about but it’s fun to keep it as a mystery. They didn’t end up together anyway haha.

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Tell us how to fund a music project.

Sites like Gofundme do a good job at raising money. Merch sales can also go a long way.

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Discuss your opinion on the safety of fans during shows and live performances.

Shows should be a respectful environment. Everyone is there for the same reason, which is to see the artists and the artists are there to make the fans happy. So, it only makes sense that everyone should work together to maintain a safe and happy environment. Otherwise, go home and watch WWE haha.

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Tell us the greatest piece of advice you have ever been given as an artist. 

The greatest piece of advice we’ve ever been given is to be ourselves in everything we do.

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Tell us what you will like to improve or change in your music.

We are obsessed with production and definitely aim to take that to the next level. We just want to incorporate as many new sounds as possible.

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Discuss vocal training and how you protect your vocal. 

Scales, hot tea, honey, and staying hydrated. I heard singing while running is supposed to be good so that’s next on the list.

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Tell us how you manage your team to make things work out.

Communication is definitely key. As long as we tell each other everything and are honest with each other, it all works out.

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Discuss your best mood during performance. 

Our best mood during a performance is whatever the audience is sending out. We feed off each other and when we can instantly tell that you’re on the same wave length with the fans during a song, there’s no better feeling.

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List your best artists of all time with reasons.      

Young The Giant is a huge influence. The songwriting is amazing and no other band sounds like them. They stay outside the box. Also love Foster The People. They’re definitely the ones we look up to when it comes to production. And once again, no one sounds like them. The next biggest would probably be The Neighborhood. They’re changing the game as we speak and are even dabbling in fashion, which is so cool. As for classics, Led Zeppelin and The Beatles hit home. They’re the ones who changed everything and paved the way for all the new bands.

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Tell us all we need to know about you.

We all met at Berklee College of Music in Boston. Patrick had known Jacob from high school in New Jersey but they really became close in college. The Penthouse started off with completely different members until it finally ended up as Patrick, Jacob, and Kyle. We’ve spent a lot of our time gigging in the NYC area and constantly working on new material. We’re moving to Los Angeles in April and it’s something we’ve had planned for a while now. We will meet a lot of our college friends there and really focus on some new material.

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Give us the links to connect you and buy your music.

 thepenthouseband.com

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Tell us the greatest problem you think is facing the society and the solution.

Gun Control. Ban them.

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Discuss your songwriting and recording process. 

The songs always stem from different things. One of us will usually have an idea and we all add to it. If the song is very personal then one of us will just write the entire thing. Music usually comes before melody. After that we like to record a demo at home in Logic Pro so that we can constantly go back to it. Once it’s ready, we re-do it in a studio.

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State the official date of release.

“Best Friend” was released on 2/29/16.

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State your artist’s name and elaborate on it.

The name “The Penthouse” was a pretty quick decision. Our college dorm had a fire escape that was 6 stories up. We could see a lot of the Boston penthouses from there so we considered the fire escape our own little penthouse. So, right there it became our name.

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State the title of the song and the meaning.

“Best Friend”. The inner conflict of falling in love with your best friend.

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State the title of the album and the reason for selecting the title.

“Best Friend” was off our first EP, “Overnight”. The formation of the band kind of happened over night on an impulse decision so it felt right to give that title to our debut EP.

Mandy Pennington

Tell us everything will need to know about you.

I’m originally from Louisville, Kentucky; I’ve lived there since I was 9 years old, but I have gone to Greenville University in Greenville, IL for the last four years. I’m graduating this May (2018) with three majors: Audio Engineering, Commercial Music (Vocal Performance), and English. I will be moving to Nashville in June to finish my degree with an internship at a recording studio, and then will be pursuing my career in music.

I have five younger siblings—four brothers and a sister—and two happily married parents. My mom is a mosaic artist and my dad is a professor/writer—we have a very artistic family. My favorite color is blue, I love to roller-skate. I also love to buy dresses; they’re my favorite kind of clothing. Right now I’m really into late-80s early-90s fashion. My favorite book series is Harry Potter and my favorite TV shows would probably be Gossip Girl, Gilmore Girls, and Friends. I really love hot drinks.

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State your favourite genre of music and your reason.

I love singer-songwriter. I know that’s a broad genre, and some of those people can also cross over into pop, because that’s an even broader genre. My favorite artists are Sara Bareilles, Ingrid Michaelson, and Taylor Swift, who I think fit into both of those categories. The reason I love singer-songwriters is that I think they capture the truest forms of emotions in their lyrics, and then let them unfold in simple and catchy melodies. That is not to say that other genres do not also tell true emotions, but songs by artists like Sara and Ingrid and Taylor have always had a special place in my heart and moved me in a way that other genres cannot. I would also place myself in the singer-songwriter genre.

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Tell us your experience as a musician.

I’ve been into music since I was really little. My favorite thing to watch when I was really little was Veggie Tales, and my dad, who was a worship leader at the time, would play all of the Veggie Tales songs on his guitar and we’d dance around the living room and sing them at the top of our lungs. They are even videos of me banging on our keyboard when I was about two years old. I had my first solo when I was 4 years old, when I sang “Silent Night” in German in a Christmas pageant at my church (incredible; I have no idea how I did that). I started taking violin lessons when my family moved to St. Andrews, Scotland, which was when I was six years old. My little brother and I would busk on the side of the street at Christmas time, playing Christmas duets on our violins, and we made a decent amount of money, and even raked in some chocolate santas one year. When we moved back to the States (Kentucky), my brother and I joined the Louisville Youth Orchestra, in which we played for a number of years. I also started taking piano lessons, and grew to love the piano. In high school, I chose to stop taking violin lessons and continue with piano and vocal lessons. I took classical voice at a music academy, and learned to expose myself to styles other than just contemporary. Also, from when I was about 9 years old; I became involved in musical theater. My first role was Gloria in The Wizard of Oz, and from then on I was Becky Thatcher in Tom Sawyer (twice), a singing plate in Beauty and the Beast, Maria in West Side Story, Lindsay in Godspell, Marian Paroo in The Music Man, and many more. For a long time, I wanted to pursue a career on Broadway, but then I realized that I couldn’t dance, and that the rough rejection of not getting parts I really wanted was going to be too hard for me in the long run. I took up songwriting when I was fifteen, and fell in love with it. Ever since I was sixteen or seventeen, I knew I wanted to be a singer-songwriter. I won some state fair karaoke competitions during middle and high school, and I continued to grow my craft. Going to university to study vocal performance was one of the best decisions of my life, because working with other musicians and being in an atmosphere of passion and dedication really transformed me as an artist. I got to play and write with others almost constantly, being a part of multiple bands on campus, and eventually added a major in audio engineering after spending so much time in the recording studios on campus. Private vocal and piano lessons, being a part of choir and chamber group, and being poured into by music faculty were things that shaped me into the artist I am today. I experience music as an expression of pent-up feelings, or a poetic way to carefully tell the truth. I can’t imagine myself or the world without it.

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Tell us the theme of your song.

In one word phrases, “Down” is about acceptance, sorrow, melancholy, bitter sweetness, realization, revelation, misunderstanding, regret, and many more things.

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Name the people behind your success and thank them on this platform.

There are many people behind my success, as there always are. My parents, of course, for paying for music lessons for so many years, practicing with me, driving me to rehearsals day after day, and always encouraging and supporting me. My dad, specifically, for giving me a love for music. My high school voice teachers, Emily and Nancy Albrink, who taught me to love classical voice, and without whom I would not have flourished as much as a vocalist in college. My college voice teacher, Miriam Angela Porter, who has been there to tell me I’m amazing and to tell me when I’m not so amazing. She has always been so truthful and so kind with me in my vocal studies and songwriting classes with her, and has become like a college mom to me. I’ve spent at least five percent of my lessons crying and talking about life in her office. Actually, all of my music teachers throughout the years (there have been eleven) have made a huge impact on me. Dr. Jeff Wilson, or “Doc,” my choir director in college, who has also poured so much into me, taught me so much about singing and music, and believed in me when I didn’t believe in myself. Stephen Leiweke, who let me hang around his studio all summer even though I turned down his internship initially, and then took stock in me and believed in me and helped me make the first record that I’ve actually been proud of for a long time. He makes me feel at home in Nashville. Thanks to all of you, because there’s no way I would be where I am personally, emotionally, or musically without you.

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Tell us about your future goals.

Well, my dream is to be a self-sufficient musician and be able to quit my day jobs. I would love to tour for a while, and I absolutely love being in the studio, so I’d like to create as many more records as I possibly can, and maybe even help others make theirs. I want to live in a community of artists who all write and perform together and love what they do.

I also would love to go to graduate school at some point in my life; I really value education and bettering myself. I also really want a family someday; relationships and family are a value I hold very dear.

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Go into detail about your opinion on religion and politics.

I am a Christian, and have been saved since I was thirteen years old. My dad was a worship pastor growing up, and now is a professor at a seminary, as well as a guest lecturer and preacher at many churches. I have led worship at various churches since I was thirteen or so, and am now the worship director at a church in Highland, Illinois. I believe in the saving grace of Jesus Christ and of our condemnation to hell because of our inherent sinful nature without that grace. This belief has carried me through a lot of pain and heartache, and brought hope to times of loneliness and depression.

Politically, I lean Republican, but can’t fully commit to either side. I am pro-life, for sure. I am undecided on many issues, not because I don’t care, but because I like to be thoughtful in my beliefs, and I haven’t quite figured it all out yet. I forgot to fill out my absentee ballot registration, so I didn’t even get to vote in my first election last year. Depressing.

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Elaborate on how you think your music is inspiring your fans.

I hope that my fans can see themselves in the songs I write. I want to do for others what my favorite artists have done for me: make them feel understood and like their feelings are heard. My favorite artists have put into words the things I knew I felt but didn’t know how to express, and I would love to do that as well. For these reasons, I work to be truthful and authentic in everything that I write, in hopes that those who listen will be able to relate and gain some insight from each song.

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Explain the changes you have observed so far in the music industry.

I see a lot of indie musicians making a living without needing a label. I see an exponential surplus of musicians trying to “make it,” whatever that means. I see the internet overcrowded with so much music in every form and every genre, which almost evens the playing field for new musicians, but also can be deafening. I think the music industry right now seems very overwhelming to enter, with so many people all wanting the same thing, and it being so hard to get people’s attention. However, I’m certainly willing to try.

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State the artists you cherish most and your reason.

Sara Bareilles. Sara is my ALL-TIME FAVORITE artist because she has touched my soul in a way no one else has. In my worst breakups and my darkest moments of doubt, her songs have understood me. Her lyrics give me moments of introspection, realization, and revelation. The way she spins those lyrics into simultaneously complex and simple melodies baffles me. I admire her so much as an artist, and love the piano-ballad sound. My favorites of hers are “Manhattan,” “Between the Lines,” “Gravity,” “December,” “1000 Times,” and “Bright Lights and Cityscapes,” though it’s so hard to choose.

Ingrid Michaelson. Ingrid does the same thing as Sara for me; the lyrical depth behind some of her songs is just incredible. However, Ingrid brings a fun to it as well, with songs like “You and I,” “The Way I Am,” “Be OK,” “Hell No,” and many others. Seeing her live was one of the most inspiring experiences of my life. She was so lovable and kind and fun-loving and relatable onstage, and I felt immediately connected to her as an artist and a person. The sonic sound of her recordings is also so intriguing and enjoyable to listen to.

Taylor Swift. Funny story: I hated Taylor Swift when I was in middle school because I hated country music. However, a friend forced me to listen to her, and I got really into “Fearless”, and from then on it was a straight shot to joining the fandom. I love Taylor for her lyrics, her music, her fun-loving spirit, her style, her branding, her savageness, her drama, her live shows, really, her everything. Her live shows are SUCH a spectacle, and I love them. I got to see the Red tour and the 1989 tour, and I’m so excited to see the Reputation tour in August. Taylor just inspires me in every way possible. Can I please be her (in another life, maybe)?

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Give us the links to your social network and stores.

iTunes

https://itunes.apple.com/us/artist/mandy-pennington /id10895 47915

Spotify

https://open.spotify.com/artist/6v16YnjTPOryfyUjccyDDc

Apple Music

https://itunes.apple.com/us/artist/mandy-penn ington/id108 9547915

Bandcamp

https://mandyreneepennington.bandcamp.com/

Noisetrade

https://noisetrade.com/mandypennington

Soundcloud

https://soundcloud.com/mandy-pennington-music

ReverbNation

https://www.reverbnation.com/mandypennington

Website

http://www.mandypennington.com

Facebook

https://www.facebook.com/mandypenningtonmusic/

Twitter

https://twitter.com/MandyRenee96

Instagram

https://www.instagram.com/mandy.pennington.music/

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Elaborate on how you develop your lyrics.

My lyrics start from so many different places. Sometimes I have a one or two word phrases that I think would be a great title or hook, and I build from them. Sometimes, I write a poem first and put music to it. Always, the lyrics are something I’ve been feeling or thinking about, and they always come from the heart. Sometimes, I’ll do a free-write, where I’ll sit down at my laptop with a blank word document, set a timer for 10 minutes, and write whatever I want without stopping. Most of it comes out as gibberish, because sometimes I’ll just write the same word over and over, or the lyrics to an old song, but there’s always a couple things I can pick out and use to start a song. Most of the time, I’ll sit down at the piano, start a voice memo on my phone, and play and sing whatever comes out. A lot of the time, lyrics will just come out of my mouth if I don’t think about it. I always make sure I’m recording for when they do. Then I hone them later.

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Tell us if you enjoy collaborating with other artists or just singing as a solo artist.

I love collaboration! There’s something about being on stage with other people, or writing a song with others, that is such a thrill. I love the idea that people can create beautiful art together. I’ve been in multiple different bands. The first I don’t like to count, but I was in a Christian cover band when I was in middle school. We were really bad. We were called “Brought to Life” and we only had one real show, which only our parents showed up to. Sad. Freshman year of college I had a band called Highland, and I co-wrote all of the songs for that band with the other lead singer, Trey Brockman. It was a fun experience to co-lead a band, and great experience for me early on in my music career to get to play shows in St. Louis, and record my first real EP in the studio. The EP we came out with was called “On Love,” and I’m really proud of it, even though the band broke up shortly after. I had a backing band for my music the next year. We called ourselves the Mandy Pennington Band, the Pennington Project, and some other names I won’t recount here. Last year I did a project called A.M. with my friend Adam Lamb, and we wrote and recorded ten electronic pop songs all in a semester, a feat I would not attempt again, as we were both also taking full class loads and working jobs.

However, that project was so satisfying, because I wrote so well with Adam—better than I’d written with anyone—and my faith in co-writing was restored. I also had the pleasure of producing and recording the whole record with Adam, and two other producers, and being a part of the collaborative process the entire time, as opposed to tracking and then letting the audio engineer do the rest of the work. Collaboration with other artists has made me better. Other artists can always teach you things you didn’t know you needed to learn. Of course, performing alone is a completely different experience, and one I enjoy, as well, but playing with a band behind me gives me a feeling of community and support that I really appreciate.

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Brief us your opinion on making music that makes people to dance or making the kind of music with genuine message that inspires them.

I think both are fine, and the world needs both. I definitely prefer songs with a genuine message that inspire me, because that’s the meat of the music that I love. However, I wouldn’t want to listen to that all of the time. When I’m getting ready for a dance I don’t listen to songs that make me want to cry! I listen to Top 40 pop stations, because that’s what pumps me up. There’s a place for both. I definitely make music in the latter category, however.

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Tell us what you know about copyright.

I know some from music business classes; I know that to officially copyright your songs you have to go through the US government, and that copyright infringement (taking or stealing from others’ art) is a federal offense.

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Discuss the impact of a Performing Rights Organization.

Performing Rights Organizations are very important for independent artists nowadays. They track where your song is played—live, on radio stations, on playlists, etc. Without them, artists miss potential royalties and revenue. I’ve made a decent amount of money from radio play through my association with ASCAP. I have a publishing company and an artist account with them.

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Elaborate on how you develop your melody and instrumentation.

Well, my songs are written in multiple different ways, but I usually start with a chord progression. After that, melody and lyrics come at the same time. There’s a rhythm to the way that words are said that really helps the development of a melody. I usually write on the piano, and then instrumentation follows from there. Having a producer really helps me, because a lot of the time it’s difficult for me to imagine the other instruments’ parts on a song I’ve written. I’ve been lucky to work with some awesome engineers, producers, and instrumentalists who have been really creative and made my songs come to life.

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Go into detail on the recording process of this song.

I tracked this song at Yackland studios with producer/engineer Stephen Leiweke. We did a demo/production track in August with just acoustic guitar, vocals, and MIDI drums so that we could send a recording of the arrangement to the bass player and drummer. Then, in October, I brought my drummer, T.J. Steinwart, down to Nashville and we tracked drums with Stephen. I tracked my friend Nathan Moll playing bass in the studios at my school, Greenville University. Stephen played acoustic and electric guitar on the track. We spent a lot of time on the vocals, getting the emotion and the tone just as we wanted it, and we comped the vocals together to get the best takes right after we were done recording. Working with Stephen was a very inclusive and collaborative process, which was so nice. I tuned the vocals when I was back at school, and recorded background parts, and sent the files back to Stephen in Nashville, where he mixed the song. It was an awesome experience to work with him on the track; it came out sounding exactly how I imagined it.

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Discuss your music performance.

I try to be as heartfelt, authentic, and relatable as I can be on stage. I don’t like having a barrier between me and the audience, so I try to invite them in to experiencing what I’m experiencing, and I try to feel how they’re feeling. I have no stage fright when it comes to singing and playing, but I do have a little bit when the song is over and I have to say something. I’ve gotten a lot better over the years, and now it’s starting to come more naturally. I have come to see my friends as fans (as many of them are), which makes it so much better.

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State the official date of release.

December 1, 2017.

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State your artist’s name and elaborate on it.

Mandy Pennington. It’s just my name! My legal name is Amanda, but I’ve been called Mandy since I was a baby.

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State the title of the song and the meaning.

This song is called “Down.” It’s about someone who has realized that their relationship is failing and is doomed to fail, and is forced to accept that reality with grace and courage. As opposed to some relationships that end suddenly and with no warning, the listener gets the feeling that the ending of this one has been a long time coming. The song isn’t supposed to be as depressing as some of the other songs I’ve written, but more just melancholy. There’s a line in the second verse that says “the free fall might be thrilling, but we’re gonna hit the ground sometime.” This was written from personal experience, as I was in a relationship that was full of passion and really exciting, and also unhealthy. The thrilling part of the relationship was that we both knew how bad it was for us, and this song is what I wish I had thought, and what I wish I had said, in that situation. I wish I could have realized that the end was inevitable. For this reason, this song represents the strength and the wisdom that I never had to recognize something unhealthy and to walk away.

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State the title of the album and the reason for picking the title.

The record is called “Now & Then.” I am really terrible at coming up with titles, so I posted on Facebook asking my fans to come up with titles for me. I got some really awesome submissions, but nothing that I was 100% set on. I searched through all of the lyrics of the seven songs that are on the record, and wrote down anything that caught my attention. It was actually my engineer/producer, Stephen Leiweke, that suggested this title to me. It’s from the last verse of “Neighbor”, the last song on the record. The verse is: “Hello neighbor, hello friend /You don’t even have a clue of who I am / but I see you through my window now and then / I could make you happy again.” I felt like this title represented the whole theme of the record, which is reminiscence and looking back at where I came from and where I am now. The songs are full of memories and pain and also joy and looking to the future. I felt that “Neighbor,” which is the most innocent and perhaps even poignant song on the record, was a fitting one to take the title from, as well. It was between “Now & Then” or “Dear Old Friend,” but I’m really glad I went with the former. Maybe I’ll use the other one for another project someday.

Caracol

Discuss your personality.
Dreamer, creative, my moods change a lot from hour to hour. I’m hard working and VERY passionate about stuff I love (especially music).

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Brief us about you as a musician.
I’m a multi-instrumentalist. My main instrument is the guitar; I also play percussion, keyboards. I love to use electronic production tools, loopers, drum machine. Mostly I try to be original in everything I do!

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Go into details on what have changed in your life for choosing music as a career.
I get to create for a living. I’m grateful for that every single day, even when there’s instability. I am free and I share my passion with people. It’s the greatest gift.

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Tell us the benefits and drawbacks of choosing music as a career.
Benefits: Freedom of creation, make people feel good, let myself be inspired and inspire others. I get to tour and travel; collaborate with wonderful human beings.

Drawbacks: our industry has crashed and it’s harder to make money than it was before. For me it’s the only drawback!
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Tell us how you will manage fame as an established artist.
I’ll see when I get there. So far, so good.

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Elaborate on the story line of this song.
“Escaliers Dorés” is a song about sensuality, inspired by tantric concepts and the symbolism of the snake.
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Tell us means of connecting you and purchasing your music online.
Website
caracolmusic.com

Receive the new EP FOR FREE via an interactive experience:
yeux.caracolmusic.com

Order the CD
yeux.caracolmusic.com/ordercd

Spotify
open.spotify.com/artist/7q7gMpTUdEVOombfNjJSLa

Facebook
facebook.com/caracolmusic

Instagram
instagram.com/caracolmusic

Twitter
twitter.com/caracolmusic

Youtube
youtube.com/user/Caracolmusique
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Let us know the greatest moment of your music career.
Every time I create a new song, it’s one of the greatest moments.
Working on my new album with Joey Waronker in Los Angeles (drummer for Beck, Roger Waters).

Touring Europe with Half Moon Run.

Opening for Toro Y Moi in Toronto.

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Tell us the highest amount of money you have ever received from your music career and how it happened.
I wrote a song for the film “Starbuck” which became a #1 at the Box Office in Canada and was distributed to 26 countries. The song “Quelque Part” won a GENIE award for “Best Original Song” and generated lots of revenue.
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Discuss your experience pertaining live performances, gigs, shows and tours.
I love touring, playing in front of people, discovering new cities and countries. The schedule is sometimes difficult and exhausting, but I enjoy it.

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Tell us how you relate with your fans.
I’m very close to my fans. I try to answer EVERY message I receive and I hope I can keep doing so for a long time. I value the people who love my music; thanks to them; I’m able to continue doing this as a career.
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Tell us what you will like to change if you have the chance to turn back the hands of time.
I wouldn’t change anything. No regrets.
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Tell us the most important people that have boosted your music career and how you met them.
My producer / musical partner Seb Ruban who has worked on all my projects.

My label Indica and my manager Franz Schuller, for working with me for so many years.

The team at Indepreneur that helped me to develop the online side of my music business.
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Brief us on what you have in mind before considering music as a career.
I was a full-time snowboarder on the semi-pro circuit of half-pipe and big air. Then I had to stop because I injured myself.
Then I studied to become a sound engineer and I was working as an assistant in recording studios.
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Discuss your good and bad experience in life.
I believe I am responsible for my happiness, so I try to live with good values, be open to the people who surround me, notice the opportunities when they present themselves and open my heart to live to the fullest.
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Name the artists that have influenced the world.
David Bowie

Bjork

Sigur Ros
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Tell us about your moment of rejections as a musician and how you are able to cope and move on.
I don’t really care as long as I believe in what I do. I focus on my intuition and the positive stuff.
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Tell us the most negative comment you have ever received about your music.
Some people think my voice is annoying (I know I have a special voice!).
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Elaborate on the recording process of this song.
I worked from my studio in Montreal with producer Seb Ruban. We also recorded a drummer and a keyboard player for additional sounds and vibes. It was fun and effortless (it’s not always the case!).
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State the official date of release.
February 2nd 2018.
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State your artist’s name and elaborate on it.
Caracol. It means “snail” in Spanish. This nickname was given to me by a Krishna monk who became my friend while on a backpacking trip to Europe. I had all my possessions in my backpack that’s why he gave me that name.
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State the title of the song and the meaning.
“Escaliers Dorés” means “The Golden Stairway”.
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State the title of the album and the reason for picking the title.
EP Title: “Les Yeux Transparents” (Transparent eyes) –
Because it’s 100% honest and authentic. I’m not afraid of people seeing through me anymore.

Aaron Robinson

Go into detail on why you decide to choose music as a career.

I choose music as a career as a vehicle to minister the Gospel of Jesus Christ in a familiar manner to the younger generations.

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Brief us the feedback you are getting from fans concerning your music.

All of the feedback is positive; many are anticipating greater things for my overall reach and exposure.

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Discuss the relevance of social networking to music.

Social networking builds an aura of appeal especially with those of like interest. It’s necessary in all facets for music.

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Brief us about the recording of this song.

This song was initially written back in 2014. However, the song wasn’t recorded until September of 2017. It was one of those songs that I had always placed on the back burner for whatever reason at the time, nonetheless I wrote each verse during a pivotal time in my life.

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Tell us the story behind the song.

This was one of the first “serious” Gospel Hip Hop songs that I had ever written with some real substance in the lyrics. In times past, I would write songs about God because I knew it was the right thing to do it but my effort was mediocre because my relationship with Him was mediocre. However, the moment I got serious about my relationship with God is when I began to produce and write lyrics with much meaning and scripture behind them. “Chosen” just so happens to be the first song I wrote that trail blazed my Gospel Hip Hop artistry.

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State your area of specialization in music.

Lyricism, flow, and my voice.

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Tell us how long it takes to finish a song from the start.

Not long for any type of song. If I’m really feeling the beat I’ll have the song written within an hour.

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Go into detail on how you develop your lyrics and melody.

The lyrics come from me first determining what the topic of the song is. The melody comes from the tempo and mood of the instrumental.

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Discuss music generally in full details.

Music creates a reality through sound that paints a visual picture in the minds of the listeners. This is why today’s culture looks the way it does, music has shaped our perception. For there is power of life and death in the very words that we speak.

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State your five favourite genres of music with reasons.

Gospel worship because it brings me closer to the Lord’s manifested presence. Hip Hop because of the tempo and wordplay. R&B because of the magnification of intimacy and love. Classical compositions because it charges me to think logically and it also relaxes my mood. Lastly, Jazz for it is soothing to my ears.

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Discuss your rehearsal.

Repetition until I can’t fail the real performance.

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State your favourite musical instruments.

Bass, cymbals, piano, snare, brass, trumpet, strings.

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Describe the chemistry between you and your fans during a live performance.

We’re all in worship towards to the Lord Jesus, that’s the only chemistry that matters.

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Discuss your personality in full details.

I am flexible and very easy going. I get along with just about anyone. I am an open minded person and have genuine interest in the livelihood of others.

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Tell us about your musical background.

I began writing lyrics and making beats at the age of 8 years old. I started recording in a studio at the age of 13 years old. At age 20, I began to pursue a musical career in the Gospel genre.

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List your musical work.

My latest singles 365 (Confess His Name), Glory In The Heavens, Chosen, and Roses and Candles; as of right now. More musical works are in progress.

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Give us the links to purchase your music and contact you.

http://aaronrobinson.hearnow.com

http://instagram.com/ar_unitedfront

http://facebook.com/AaronUnitedFront

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Share your memorable experiences with us.

Listening to my song 365 (Confess His Name) on 91.5 in Atlanta and seeing the joy and happiness that my immediate family display as we all listened to the song in my mother’s living room.

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Tell us the good and bad side of mankind you know.

The good is that mankind acts civilized and respectable overall. The bad is that crime and perversion is tolerated by many.

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State the official date of release.

November 4, 2017.

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State your artist’s name and elaborate on it.

Aaron Robinson which is my birth name. I was named Aaron after my mother Sharon. Aaron has the meaning of a priest for the Lord. Robinson was my mother’s maiden name before her recent marriage.

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State the title of the song and the meaning.

Chosen is the title of the song. There is a scripture that states “many are called but few are chosen,” for in this song I am declaring that I have accepted the call of Jesus Christ.

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State the title of the album and the reason for picking the title.

“From the Ground Up”, is the name of the album for my life started from the bottom but the hand of God lifted me up by His Spirit.

D’Champ

Tell us how you fund your music projects.

I work part-time at a Petstore here in my city, Oshawa.

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Tell us if your music career is paying your bills.

Sadly at this point my music career is not paying the bills. I believe that my hard work and dedication will eventually pay off and my career will begin to pay the bills. It’s just a matter of time.

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Tell us if you will change the style of your music to sign a record deal. 

My goal is and always will be to make the best possible music for the fans. If I get suggestions that I agree with for improving the music, it is possible I would make small changes to improve. However I would never change the style to different genre, I still need to be me out there!

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Tell us the process of writing a song from scratch to the final stage. 

I search tirelessly my email, YouTube and SoundCloud for the perfect beat. Once I find it I begin freestyling some vocals over it. If I find my vocals work well with a particular beat I start to write down some lyrics. Once the lyrics are written I hit the studio and record it. Then it’s off the mixer to mix and master the track, and bam new track is complete!

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Tell us if you have a guideline or standard set for your music production. 

If it isn’t lit it isn’t a hit! I only put out fire music, if I don’t think it’s up to par its back to scratch to create something new and better…

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Tell us your preparation for a live performance and how you ensure the quality and output of your music is never compromised. 

I practice my set every day leading up to the event and make sure I know all my lyrics before ever hitting the stage. I communicate with the sound guy ahead of time to make sure everything is going well with setup at the venue. I also deliver a high energy performance and make sure to get people moving every time!

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Tell us your bad habit. 

I drink and get so hyped up off of caffeine it’s ridiculous, I drink espresso out my espresso machine and regular coffee out my French press. I also drink 6-8 cups of tea every day. I get so buzzed that I walk around in circles while people talk to me. I plan on getting a gold espresso machine someday…

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Tell us if you are totally in control of your performance or you are still learning.

I don’t think it’s possible to fully control your performance, I think there’s a certain give and take between the artist and the audience. You have to feel everyone’s energy and participate in the moment with them not just control them at every move. But I am always learning and I think there will always be room to improve when it comes to performing.

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Tell us that precious moment you chose music as a career.

I was high with my best friend and we were brainstorming things to do in life. I always wanted to rap and I brought up the suggestion that we should start writing rap music and put it on YouTube. The next week I bought everything I needed for a home studio and it all began.

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Tell us the greatest feedback you have ever received on a song of yours. 

I was performing at a bar, it was a smaller show. I had just performed “Bad Bitch”, and a man I had just met told me he had been listening to hip-hop for 33 years and the song I had just performed “Bad Bitch” was one of the greatest songs he had ever heard.

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Tell us your side interest apart from music. 

I sip crazy amount of tea; I have tried many different types and would like to someday drink some of the world’s most expensive teas. White to green teas, chai to chamomile I flux with it all. However my favorite is white tea. In the past it was exclusive to emperors, I like to feel like royalty when I sip on my tea. I also like to work out almost daily. I do cardio and strength workouts. I also like going shopping and eating different vegan foods as I have been a vegan for 10 years.

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Tell us the artist that mostly influenced you as a musician. 

It’s hard to pinpoint just one, Juicy J has influenced me to get that paper and blow that haze. Whereas Tyler the Creator has taught me to do my own thing and not care what people think.  Drake of course has been a huge influence as well, inspires me to keep doing it as big as I can, he proves you can get as big as you want coming out of Canada. The dream is out there you just got to make it happen.

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Tell us if you are more comfortable singing as a solo artist than collaborating with others.

I generally perform and work the music on my own. I’ve been mostly solo thus far. However lately I’ve had some rappers feature on the track. I’ve had AuCoin just recently. I also have a track with Tai Smoove dropping soon.

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Tell us the full details of this song. 

So “Bad Bitch” is a club type song I put together. I was feeling like I wanted to hear myself get played up in the clubs. So I made something for just that. It’s a song all about a bad bitch that I’m seeing and about how I’m living this high intensity life keeping up to her. Of course, she is bad as well… I really feel that she won’t disappoint.

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State the links to your social networks and stores.

You can follow me on Twitter here

https://twitter.com/dchamprap

You can follow me on Instagram here:

https://www.instagram.com/dchamprap/

Make sure to check out my Spotify page

https://open.spotify.com/artist/1h6YVwcvcgv2zG7wZhJgmT

And finally you can buy my new album on iTunes here

https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/hustlers-odyssey/1341938503

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Tell us the kind of organization you will set up to fight a cause and state your reason for fighting the cause.

In the future, I could see myself starting an animal rights organization. I believe that since animals experience pain similar to humans, they should be treated similar to humans. I think it’s cruel to use animals when it is unnecessary and awful for the environment.

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Tell us how you feel while performing. 

I feel great. I like to get really lost in the moment and get the crowd as hyped up as possible.

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Tell us the dos and don’ts in the music business. 

Do remember it takes money to make money. (Invest in yourself).

Don’t trust phony promo companies.

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Tell us your opinion on smoking, health is wealth but people still smoke. 

I think it’s key to be happy, you can’t always achieve this if you’re unhealthy. If you’re smoking I don’t hate you, but I don’t advise your lifestyle. But hey everyone does everything for a reason so who am I to judge. But smoking weed on the other hand is perfectly OK for most people.

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State the official date of release.

December 29th 2017.

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State your artist’s name and elaborate on it.

D’Champ –

So there are couple reasons why I chose D’Champ. First of all I’m Da champ so you know what it is.

Secondly my last name is Deschamps which sounds a lot like D’Champ when people pronounce it without the correct French accent.

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State the title of the song and the meaning. 

“Bad Bitch”-

So “Bad Bitch” is a female that is fine as hell. I wanted this song to be about a bad bitch. I also like to dedicate it to all the bad bitches in the crowd when I perform so the name just fits.

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State the title of the album and the reason for picking the title.

Hustler’s Odyssey

So Hustler’s Odyssey is a name I chose because I hustle hard out here. It’s an everyday grind. And it’s an Odyssey because it tells the story of my grind.