Steve Hensby Band – Chase The Sun

Steve Hensby Band

 

Steve Hensby Band – Chase The Sun

Steve Hensby Band – Chase The Sun

 

ARTIST NAME: Steve Hensby Band

 

SONG TITLE: Chase The Sun

 

DATE: April 2019

 

GENRE: Funk/Soul/World/Folk

 

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The Steve Hensby Band are heavy on the horns and very danceable!

 

Their self-titled debut was well received and featured folk music from different parts of the world fused together to make a gypsy/circus style album.

 

For the follow up ‘Chase the Sun’ they drew from Soul/Groove/ Funk music and added a five-piece horn section.

 

In between releasing albums, they put on ‘Steve Hensby’s Circus’ to sold-out crowds at FRINGE WORLD Perth in January 2018, this featured aerial, contortion, clown, burlesque and fire routines performed to songs from the first album.

 

In December 2018/January 2019 they went on their first UK in duo form, with Steve’s humour, talent, and energy combined with Elysia’s beautiful vocals never failing to win over audiences.

 

Both albums have had heavy airplay including Triple J and Double J as well as local radio stations all over Australia. Their song ‘Naf Naf’ has been nominated for the 2019 WAM Song of Year.

 

In 2019, the full Steve Hensby Band played to big crowds at Fairbridge Folk Festival, Nannup Music Festival, and Joondalup Festival.

 

As a duo, they toured Brisbane and Melbourne in April and are heading back in September/October before returning to play shows in UK/Europe in January 2020.

 

Steve Hensby is a Berklee graduate and WAMI nominated musician who also works as a session player in the Perth area.

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Discuss the story behind your music video.

We wanted a lively video that had a lot of movement and incorporated the whole band. The song itself is a collaboration between Steve Hensby Band and Optamus from Downsyde. I had an idea and we workshopped it at his studio and then went away and wrote and recorded the song… He added his vocals to the track and sent it through and it blew me away! It’s a lot of fun working with Optamus and he brings so many ideas and a lot of energy to the table.

 

Downsyde are Western Australian hip hop royalty and have an interesting approach to music and making albums. They make very honest recordings that are soul driven and collaborate with a lot of different people both in Downsyde and with their solo projects. They put on a very energetic live show!

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State the name of the locations in your music video.

We shot the video at Lake Monger in Perth Western Australia; it’s a beautiful spot with some great views of the city in the background. There were a lot of local folks going for their morning run/walk that might have made it into the footage!  The spot where the full band is playing is on a little jetty at the lake and we managed to claim it for 30 minutes or so. It didn’t take very long at all.

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List the members of the crew that produced this video and use this opportunity to thank them.

Paul Bovenkerk shot the video and he and Paul Hayes edited it. They are amazing chaps and had a lot of great ideas.

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Explain your emotional state while shooting the music video. 

We were having a blast! We were finding spots around the lake to shoot footage and generally being a nuisance. Optamus had a few Downsyde fans stop and say hello as well.

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Share your press release and reviews with us.

 

Review by  Nkechi Anele (Triple J Radio) of the second single ‘Time’s Up’ from the Chase The Sun Album

 

From the get-go, this funk tune put me in the best mood. Whimsical and cheeky, this tune just oozes good times and boogie nights.

 

Review of our circus show by Ben Ashley (Fringe Feed)

4.5/5

 

When the zaniness of Steve Hensby’s Circus began, no one seemed to quite know what to expect.

 

Channeling vintage circus vibes circa 1920, the intimate setting of The Showman’s Fair’s Opticum was a perfect playground for this motley crew of musicians, acrobats, contortionists, and fire-dancers.

 

Flourishing in his role as multi-instrumentalist and ringleader, Hensby has seamlessly blended his album of eclectic big band show-tunes with dazzling displays of human skill and physicality.

 

The WAMI-nominee is accompanied by his equally impeccably dressed band and vibrant brass pundits Junkadelic. Situated at the top of the tent, they provide the perfect soundtrack to the madness of the circus below.

 

It’s here that everyone is fixated on. What begins as a safe pantomime comedy of some rather flexible clowns quickly escalates into amazing feats of the human body.

 

The expertise of the performers is undeniable as they dance, twist and somersault. Madame Moët commands the stage with the skill and confidence of a seasoned professional, and she maneuvers the aerial silks like poured wine.

 

The talented Miss Terri undergoes no less than three costume changes in an unconventional act before Saskia Twist demonstrates the flexibility that will make your eyes water.

 

And that’s before the climactic fire comes out, dancing and twirling in such a mesmerizing way that you almost forget you’re inside a small flammable wooden tent.

 

Acrobatic troupe Equilibrium inject some light-hearted humour into the mix, and their interaction with the flame had the audience on the edge of their benches.

 

The gypsy grooves are punctuated by an impressive vocal performance by Hensby and his singer Elysia Murphy, resulting in tunes that are dynamic, catchy, and most of all, fun.

 

A personal highlight was when the brass band descend into the fray.

 

Despite its short running time, the show is jam-packed from start to finish and you’d be hard pressed to not find something to love. While it seems chaotic at first, the pacing falls into a nice rhythm and amps up at just the right time.

 

You may have seen circus acts before, but you’ve never seen them quite like this.

 

Review of our circus show by Karen Lowe (Xpress Magazine)

9/10

 

While I had heard of this before as they have done previous shows at the Newport Hotel, this was my first opportunity to see Steve Hensby’s Circus for myself. With no expectations and no real idea of what I was about to see, I am certain that the rest of the audience were in the same boat but from what we heard coming out from the Opticum (The Showman’s Fair), it sounded like we were in for a treat.

 

For Fringe regulars, The Showman’s Fair and the Opticum are both new additions, and the Opticum is a fabulous space. The band had a designated spot to play up top and gave it a ‘ye olde theatre’ feel to it, and that in itself created a buzz of excitement around the room.

 

The night started with a beautiful family scene and left you feeling all warm and fuzzy inside. When Hensby came running out (looking like a decidedly less evil Willy Wonka), the family scene broke up and started to get a little crazy as Hensby and the band sang The Beatles’ Being For The Benefit Of Mr. Kite and the circus really started to take off.

 

Aside from the first song, the rest were originals written by Hensby; even though they were written before the idea for the circus came about, the performances of Madam Moet, Saskia Twist, Miss Terri, and Equilibrium made the songs feel like they were written just for them.

 

There was so much attention to detail, from the choreography, to the outfits, and to the performance of the band itself, that everything worked together perfectly and felt like they had been doing this for years. Brass band Junkadelic even had a starring role as they came down to the stage and played for everyone with a couple of players running up the stairs and into the audience.

 

You see so many of these types of shows at Fringe every year with pole dancers, burlesque, fire twirling, acrobatic acts, and contortionists; however, with the addition of the live music (complete with an accordion player), the original songs, and the talent of Hensby and the Steve Hensby Band, they made this one stand out from the crowd. They have brought something new to Fringe and created a show that is not to be missed.

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Discuss your music career so far.

I have been playing live shows regularly since I was 14. I attended Berklee College of Music in Boston USA at 18 and graduated with a Professional Music Degree when I was 23.

 

I started a 3-piece rock and roll band in Boston and brought it back to Australia and with a few different line-ups and two countries, we ran for about 10 years.

 

We toured a lot around Australia and had a lot of national and a bit of international airplay on US college radio. During this time and through to today I work as session guitarist and vocalist for various different bands, projects, and random gigs as well as writing songs and running Steve Hensby Band.

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Tell us if you aspire to go into acting.

If an opportunity came up I might have a crack at it but it’s definitely not something I’m looking out for, it’s hard enough doing photo shoots! Our live shows are a lot of fun so if I had a guitar in my hand maybe.

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Tell us your gains and losses in the music business.

Gains from the industry is that I’ve met so many friends from playing music as gigging 3-4 times a week turns into your social life. It’s all I wanted to do as a kid growing up, it’s a lot of work but it’s a lot of fun. There haven’t been any losses really, I suppose when looking at the big picture you don’t make a lot of money in the music industry for the number of hours you put in. Really that’s the way all arts industries have been since the dawn of time so you just have to get on with it.

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List the media that have supported you so far with this song.

There are a few local Perth media folks that have helped us RTRFM played ‘Chase The Sun’ a couple of times, WAM (West Australian Music Industry) did a feature on our last UK tour and Around The Sound is always very supportive of us and our music. Nationally Triple J Radio played our song ‘Loving Heart’ which was very lovely! About half the album has been regularly played on community radio all around Australia and the West Australian newspaper has published an article about me and my partner in music and life, Elysia.

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Tell us how you manage your time.

I lecture music at TAFE – the equivalent of a technical college in the UK and also lecture at WAAPA, the Western Australian Academy of Performing Arts. As much as I am a working original/session musician and songwriter, I enjoy teaching music as a day job. I find it very rewarding and then as a session player I can just play the gigs/sessions I really enjoy doing. I am a very busy person but I wouldn’t have it any other way, I adore being so involved with music in various different platforms.

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Tell us how you are able to actualize success in your music career.

Success is an interesting topic in the music industry. There is such a stigma that attached to ‘making it’ and in 2019 where you make $0.000003 per stream or something obscene, it’s hardly a career that’s going to pay your bills! To me success is that I am very lucky, I get to play with absolutely amazing musicians that I am privileged to call friends. This spans back to Berklee days 15 years ago as well. Also because of music I have got to travel to a lot of the world that I wouldn’t have done without it. That to me is successful because the hardest part of this industry is having any kind of longevity.

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Tell us if you an independent artist or you are a signed artist and tell us how you run your music career.

I am an independent artist and spend most of my time on the Steve Hensby Band project. I write a lot of music and we are trying to put out a full-length album every year, aside from that I’m constantly fishing for gigs whether they are at home in Perth, around the state of Western Australia, nationally or overseas. The most important thing for me is not wasting the band’s time, I’m very lucky to play with pro musicians. As a songwriter, it’s very inspiring writing for a great sounding band.

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List the individuals responsible for your songwriting, production, recording, directing, choreography, promotion and marketing of this project.

I have been pushing it myself. It involves writing a silly number of emails but is very rewarding. I have collaborated with Dylan Hooper on songs in terms of horn parts and Elysia wrote a song for the new album and we wrote another song together. Her song ‘Naf Naf’ has been nominated for a WAM Song of the Year and the video clip has made the shortlist for The Revelation Film Festival. I also write songs for her to sing and it works well live to have both male and female-led songs.

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Tell us the instruments put together for the song.

Steve Hensby Band is a 9-piece band 2 vocals, guitar, Elysia – keys and vocals, Karl – bass, Greg – drums, Laura – trumpet, Ned – trombone, Marc – alto saxophone, Dylan – tenor saxophone and Meg – baritone saxophone.

 

The horns originated from the Perth based New Orleans street band ‘Junkadelic’ who I have had the pleasure of singing with on occasion.

 

The first album was more accordion/world/folk music based but merged into the funk/soul sound of the last album because of the lovely horns and what I was writing. The writing process varies from song to song, I have my little ideas about horn lines, melodies and arrangements and I’ll transcribe them on the manuscript. Then the wonderful Dylan Hooper (Tenor Sax/Horn MD/Lovely Upstanding Gentlemen) will turn them into something amazing! He has a very solid background in jazz but not only can he play any style but he can also write music in any style if ears had a ranking he would definitely be superheroes.

 

Greg, Marc, and Meg are multi-instrumentalists who also compose music, Laura runs the Perth Thundercorp, a roving brass band that plays at Perth sporting events, Karl is one of the most in-demand session players in town and Ned, as well as being a great musician, is in the film industry.

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Tell us your experience recording in the studio and shooting the music video.

Recording this album was one of the best experiences of my life. We tracked at Villa Studio in Osbourne Park in Perth and it was recorded and mixed by Josh Dyson.

 

Josh did an incredible amount of work on this album and really heard what I was going for as an overall concept without us talking about it. The man has amazing ears. Most musicians would have to pay a huge amount of money to get that happening but I’m lucky enough to have that from a mate!

 

The album was mastered by Les Williams, who is Perth rock and roll mixing royalty and is great to work with.

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Tell us the piece of advice you will give to a new artist planning to shoot a music video. 

I think nowadays you don’t need to think about big budget, we know mates who have shot videos on iPhones and they have looked great.

 

In my experience, so many young bands box themselves into what they think is right and correct when they should just go out and do it.

 

The main thing is planning and having a specific idea in mind and adhering to that plan, but having said that videoing a band that is smashing through a great live show works well too.

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Tell us the estimate of a commercial music video based on your experience. 

I’ve been lucky enough to have friends to work and collaborate with for videos, and people who are looking to hone their craft in film-making. So I wouldn’t be able to say how much something like that would cost in commercial terms.

 

Our next video, Naf Naf, was made by Amina Hughes, on her directorial debut. She entered a music video competition and it’s going to be aired at the upcoming Revelation Film Festival – we can’t wait for the screening!

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Tell us the reason you shot a video for this song.

We wanted to show what the song was about and have a clip to promote the album. As a musician, it’s easy to say ‘why can’t people just listen to music?’ but a video is not only a laugh to shoot but gets the song out to a wider audience.

 

For Elysia’s song ‘Naf Naf’ we went the opposite direction to ‘Chase The Sun’ – we had the band playing in an upmarket bar in Perth and had tango dancers, circus folks, belly dancers and other assorted treats! The two songs definitely called for different video clips.

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State your artist’s name and elaborate on it.

Steve Hensby Band – I’m lucky enough to find a band already named after me! It began as a solo project; an avenue for me to explore all the different styles of music that I’m interested in, that wouldn’t have fit into my rock band. It’s now expanded into the 9-piece band that it is today.

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State the title of the song and the meaning.

‘Chase The Sun’ is about focusing on being positive and optimistic.

 

The first line ‘trip out of bed in the morning’ means it’s easy to get bogged down with world issues and things that make you feel down, but one should try and rise above them. The modern world we live in is focused so much on social media and the negativity associated with it, I think it’s very important to be better than that. Listen to more Noel Coward, The Kinks and Motown!

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State the title of the album and the reason for choosing the title.

The album title ‘Chase The Sun’ is named after the title track, like the song, the album is full of songs about staying positive and looking on the bright side of life. I predominantly write music as a way to feel good and hopefully, the message of peace and love transpires into the albums and live shows.

 

Mobile Version

Fall Into Place – Street of War

Fall Into Place – Street of War

 

Fall Into Place – Street of War

Fall Into Place – Street of War

 

ARTIST NAME: Fall Into Place

SONG TITLE: Streets of War/Isolate

 

ALBUM TITLE: Embrace The Chaos

 

RELEASE DATE: June 21st, 2019

 

GENRE: Rock/Hard Rock

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Discuss your recording experience with your producer.

Probably the best experience we’ve had as a band. When it comes down to details and knowledge of sound and music he was very helpful. He helped open our eyes to new ideas.

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Discuss what comes first and last while creating a song.

I think it’s a feeling thing. We have written songs in so many different ways, and some of the most liked songs have been written in an hour.

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Tell us the piece of advice you will give to a new artist.

Our piece of advice would be to write the way you feel. Lots of people in the world experience the same problems in life, so when you express that in a song people can relate and you capture the listener… and enjoy what you do always!

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Discuss your worse experience in the music business.

Playing at the wrong venue! When you play at a small town country bar and your music is hard rock… people tend to yell “turn down the suck”. Then the fight is on.

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Tell us how you deal with rejection.

Rejection is part of the music world. Even the biggest names in music history have been rejected and they have climbed to the top. Not everyone is going to like your music; it is just reality so truly understanding that helps to see past the negative feeling. Just because one radio station doesn’t like you, doesn’t mean the others won’t. Keep your head up people!

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Tell us what you are doing to impact the people around you.

We play the music that our fans want to hear. We fundraise for the volunteers of our community. And we interact with people expressing our gratitude and love for their support.

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Tell us the music that makes you happy.

As the lead singer of FIP, all music influences me in some way. I listen to everything from symphonic music to hard rock to rap. What makes me truly happy is to see the heart that someone or a band has put into a piece of art they have created. You just can’t ignore the true passion.

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Tell us how you make instrumentation to your song.

We are a 3 piece band, so to be creative and write music to sound like a 4 or 5 piece is harder than people think. When we write the instrument side of things, we try to bounce between the bass taking the lead or the guitarist taking the lead. Make the drums as full as we can and mix the two guitars to carry one or the other. The vocals are also used as an instrument… we believe in creating layers, recording or live.

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Tell us how you feel when you sing and your fans sing along to your song.

Well, we truly think as original artists, this is what we live for. When this happened for the first time it almost made me stop singing in that current moment. You feel like you have achieved what you set out to do, and that is to truly connect with people.

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Tell us the goals you aim to achieve when creating a song.

To get your message out and to have people relate. The goal is to capture the listener… and to get on the radio.

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Tell us your approach to songwriting.

Our approach to songwriting is to naturally let the process flow. It seems if you try to force something, it will never truly come out the right way.

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Tell us how you plan to develop a unique music style.

We are all inspired by our favourite artists, but because of our true love for all genres, we think the different styles give us a creative and unique sound.

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Tell us how to record a song.

Multi-tracking – Lay out your ghost tracks with the drums…lay out your guitars, then bass, then your vocals.  Very basic we know but the key to perfection is to not sound too perfect. Be creative and make layers to fill the song and to force the brain to think about what it’s listening to.

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Tell us if you are collaborating with other songwriters or you write alone.

We write as a single band… sometimes we write as individuals and bring our own songs to the table, but we make sure to involve everyone’s style so all parties enjoy what they’re playing.

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Discuss your experience with fans.

Well, I’m going to be honest here and say in the past there have been some mixed feelings. Some people pose as fans but really do not want to see you succeed (I guess then they wouldn’t be your fans).  The rest of the people that follow us and support us are amazing and we could never do this without them. Cliché I know – It very true. Thank you to all our fans!

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State your experience with booking gigs and shows.

It’s hard to get your name out and to be taken seriously. Lots of places will not even listen to your music or book you for a show if you’re not under a label, but be dedicated. Playing bars is hard to get your originals out because they hired you to play cover songs, and very unbelievable… but we do it anyway!

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Tell us if you consider a song placement in TV or Film.

We might have our songs in an upcoming film called Thunderstruck 18. Hopefully, it all works out but yes we definitely would love our music to be involved in TV or Film.

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Elaborate on the song.

It’s all about not letting any generation get pushed around, controlled or put in their place. We all have a voice; we just need to use them in the right way.

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Elaborate on your artist name and the title of the album.

Our name came from each of our experiences in music and life. How the world seems to bring things together and put them into play. How the past worked out and how everything just falls into place.

 

The album name is a mix of what every song means. It touches base on the chaos of what we deal with physically and mentally as humanity. Everything is a learning experience (good or bad) so just embrace it, and learn from it.

 

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Wyland – Lost

Wyland – Lost

 

Wyland – Lost

Wyland – Lost

 

ARTIST NAME: Wyland

 

SONG TITLE:  Lost

 

ALBUM TITLE: In A Circuitry of Lonely

 

GENRE: Indie Rock

 

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Hailing from the Meadowlands of New Jersey, Wyland have made a name for themselves in the live circuit.

 

Conjuring a bit of grit with the indie spirit of acts like Foals and the Arctic Monkeys, the band creates a fresh and unique live experience that sets them apart from their contemporaries.

 

Their sound reached overseas to Ireland, where the band spent the better half of 2018 recording with producer Philip Magee (Kodaline, Miles Kane, The Academic).

 

They recently finished an East Coast tour with Universal recording artist Valley, and their last single ‘Nowhere Now’ amassed over 130,000 streams on Spotify since its release in late 2018. It was also featured on Spotify’s Fresh Finds playlist shortly after its release.

 

The alt-rock group has performed at festivals alongside acts like Mumford and Sons, Alabama Shakes, The Maccabees, The Flaming Lips and many more while receiving praise from outlets such as Ones to Watch, The Line of Best Fit, Clash, Born Music and more.

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Discuss your music process and recording in full details.

Every song comes together differently. It’s like I’m waiting for something to happen and then knowing what to do with it when it does happen.  In regards to recording, I like to hear the live energy of the band. So I prefer tracking live. I’m not a fan of auto-tune or dinky sounds even though they somehow make their way into our tracks from time to time.

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Discuss how you get involved in music.

I went to Bonnaroo in 2011 and it changed my view on popular music and then I followed up Bonnaroo with Coldplay in Boston. Those two events changed my life…it made me want to start playing music.

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Elaborate on the secret to success.

Success is objective. Make sure you love what you’re doing. That’s the only way to live. If you don’t love what you’re doing, stop it now and find the thing you do love.

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Discuss how you distribute your music.

It’s all mystery really. We have a team by the name of Rhyme and Reason Records. They’re a small group of badass women who know how to shake things up.

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Describe your vocal ability.

Angelic. A gift from God…

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Tell us how you develop the instrumentation for this song.

Well, it all started with that opening riff. I wish I could take credit for writing it but an old grumpy friend of mine did. And then I wrote a song with it and he let me keep it.

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Discuss your musical ability.

It’s pretty mediocre, to be honest. Every day I feel like a scam artist that’s barely holding on.

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Elaborate on the lyrics of the song.

I only sing something I believe in. Lyrically, I talk about where I’ve been for the past couple years with Ariella (the other lead singer of this band) and what that’s done to us. This song is about that.

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Discuss the structure of the song.

The structure is a bit too conventional for me. I had plans to prolong the bridge and experiment with some other aspects but everybody is always trying to simplify because they’re worried…

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Discuss your performance

Mildly theatrical.

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Tell us how you prepare for a show or recording session.

For a show, I stretch and jump around like a monkey. For a recording session, I shut off the lights and pretend I’m on stage. It’s all very circular.

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Discuss how you promote your music.

We have to hustle and think up some clever routes to take.

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Tell us how you ensure your vocal is in harmony with the instrumentation.

I don’t put much thought into it. If it feels good, then it’s right. If it feels wrong or uncomfortable then it’s wrong.

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Tell us how you build your vocal melody.

I start singing and I let it take me where it wants to go. I try not to put too much thought into it. The more natural the process, the more natural it’ll come out at the end.

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Elaborate on the title of the album.

This whole record is about being stuck in the same place for too long and what that does to someone who’s always dreamed of bigger things. The title is ‘In A Circuitry of Lonely’. I have no idea how I came up with it but it felt right.

 

Mobile Version

Primes - Nine Lives

Primes – Nine Lives

 

Primes - Nine Lives

Primes – Nine Lives

 

ARTIST NAME: Primes

 

SONG TITLE:  Nine Lives

 

RELEASE DATE: 21 June 2019

 

GENRE: Alternative Rock

 

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Primes are three-piece from Falkirk in Central Scotland, Ollie Kitchen (Lead Vocals/Bass), Sarah Monteith-Skelton (Guitar/Vocals) and Reece Ryan (Drums/Vocals).

 

The band is referred to have taken influential sounds from bands like Kings of Leon, Feeder, Foo Fighters, Biffy Clyro and Malory Knox.

 

Primes have a blend of unforgettable melodies, punchy chorus drops and the unique combination of three-way harmonies.

 

Primes have managed to secure their slot at massive festivals in 2019 such as Vibration Festival, ButeFest, Gig In The Goil and Party At the Palace this year, this gives Primes the opportunity to share a stage with inspiring musicians like Feeder, The Coral, Deacon Blue, Wet Wet Wet, KT Tunstall and The Charlatans.

 

Primes are releasing new music regularly with six consecutive single releases available now. A further three singles will be released throughout 2019.

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State your history.

We formed in November 2017 as Primes. We all have a background in music, Sarah was a successful solo artist and Ollie has been in a few successful bands. This is Reece’s first band but has been playing drums at a young age.

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Describe yourself as an artist.

Passionate, hardworking with a never give up attitude.

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Tell us the genre of your music.

Alternative Rock.

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Tell us the story behind your song.

‘Nine Lives’ is about making the same mistakes over and over, never learning from them. Eventually, you will run out of lives.

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Tell us the problems you are facing as a musician.

Our problems are usually financially. Being able to fund the band and maintaining the standards required to be successful can often be challenging.

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Discuss the recording and production of the song.

In the studio is where we feel the song comes together properly. You get to know the ins and outs of the track. This always gives you a good feel for the song and allows you to play about with ideas to see what works and doesn’t work.

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List the names of blogs, radio or television stations that have supported you so far.

Amazing Radio

 

BBC Introducing Scotland

 

Rock Sport Radio

 

The Sun Newspaper

 

The Falkirk Herald

 

Discovery Music Scotland

 

The Songbird Blog

 

Heard Not Herd

 

Music For The Misfits

 

Spotlight UK

 

Moshville

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Elaborate on your music career, experience, and future goals.

We have all been really involved in music from a young age and influenced by our families.

 

Sarah then went on to study music and started performing live shows since then.

 

Ollie has also been involved in music from a young age and been in a few bands previously.

 

This is Reece’s first band but has always been involved in music from school.

 

Our future goal is to be as successful as we can be.

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Brief us what inspires you to write, compose and sing.

I think it’s honestly just who you are as a person. There is nothing more inspiring to me than composing our own music and being passionate about it.

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Brief us the top-secret behind making a hit song.

Once we have a hit song, I’ll let you know the secret…

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Tell the piece of advice you will give to an upcoming artist.

Be nice to people. Believe in yourself.

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Tell us how you write your lyrics, compose, sing and record in the studio.

We usually just jam out a song, find a structure and practice the track. We record it on our phones in the practice room without vocals. We then write a melody to the music. Ollie writes lyrics to it with Sarah and Reece’s input.

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Name your favourite artists for collaboration.

Dave Grohl. The man is a legend.

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Share your press release and reviews with us.

Music For The Misfits

 

The Songbird

 

Spotlight UK

 

Heard Not Herd

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Tell us how you will spend a million dollars.

I would look after my family and friends. I would give some to charity. Then Primes would continue doing what we do….at a much higher level, I would imagine…

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Discuss music promotion and how you are boosting your fan base.

Promotion is something we are trying to work really hard on. We started off from building a fan base in our hometown then ventured out into bigger Cities. It’s something that we continue to work on daily. We like to keep things fresh and always make sure we have content to keep posting on socials to maintain momentum and consistency. We release music regularly to keep things fresh and we just try to reach as many potential new fans as possible.

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Tell us how you manage other activities with your music career.

I personally don’t find that challenging. If you learn to manage time efficiently and are organized you can fit everything in.

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State your artist’s name and elaborate on it.

Primes – We just liked the positive meaning behind the word and felt that this is the aim of the band.

 

“The state or time of greatest vigour or success in a person’s life…

 

You are in the prime of life…”

 

Mobile Version

The Thieves About - Hurricane

The Thieves About – Hurricane

 

The Thieves About - Hurricane

The Thieves About – Hurricane

 

ARTIST NAME: The Thieves About

 

SONG TITLE: Hurricane

 

ALBUM TITLE: The Chaos Theory – EP

 

RELEASE DATE: July 1, 2019

 

GENRE: Alternative Rock

 

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The Thieves About is an alternative rock band based in Encinitas, California – a small beach community just north of San Diego.

 

Singer and guitarist J. Scott Gavin moved to Encinitas from the Phoenix area in 2015. In 2017, he began collaborating with bassist Jeff Redding. Chicago native Brian Ulery joined as the band’s drummer shortly after and the trio immediately began writing and performing in bars and music clubs throughout the San Diego area.

 

In late 2017, The Thieves About recorded and released their self-titled debut EP. The band’s popularity grew, and the trio began performing all over Southern California and the Phoenix Metropolitan Area.

 

Looking to further evolve their sound, the band picked up lead guitarist John Reikes in late 2018. Now a 4-piece, The Thieves About quickly grew their sound to fill their new larger canvas. Shortly thereafter, the band wrote and recorded their sophomore EP, The Chaos Theory. The first single off the EP, “Hurricane,” immediately received airplay on San Diego radio stations.

 

With its 1990s-influenced sound, the band’s music pays homage to the flannel-clad days of Generation X.

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Discuss your approach to music production.

Music, to me, is all about feeling, emotion, and experience. It’s hard for me to sit down and write without the motivation from a previous experience or thought. It’s hard to pinpoint when a song will hit, or when a thought, verse/chorus comes to mind, but when it does it’s important for me to capture that and run with that feeling. Once I get moving, the chords and lyrics usually flow and I’ll jot it down in a stream of consciousness. Once I feel I’ve got a good idea or the direction I want to go, then I bring it to the band, and we work together to make the vision become a reality. As we move forward as a band, I look forward to exploring many different aspects of production and incorporating new technologies.

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Elaborate on how you come up with your lyrics.

Everything that I’ve written to this point comes from previous life experience. Whether or not I’ve interpreted it the way that it happened is irrelevant. But for some reason, that experience stuck with me and I’ve reached a point where I want to share it. Every time I sing it takes me back to the place I was when I decided to write about it.

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Discuss your songwriting process.

At this point, I’m a work in progress. I used to lean on heartbreak, alcohol, and depression to craft what I considered a brilliant song. It was easy to write about heartbreak because I felt that everyone has had their heart broken and could relate, but not everyone knows true love or happiness.

 

I am currently working to change that and focus on the beauty in life and the things that could bring peace, love, and happiness. I sit down (when I have time) and do some stream of conscious based on my surroundings, my mood, and what motivates me at the moment. I have a tendency to think of big hooks and choruses and go from there.

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Tell us about your next project.

Expand. Explore. Take my songwriting to the next level and grow together as a band. I’d like to allow more creative input from my bandmates and organically grow some new music. I haven’t always allowed that, and now I’m ready to let go of some insecurities and try to go places with my music that I haven’t gone before. Oh, and I have at least another 5 song EP on the shelf ready to tear down and build up again.

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Tell us what you won’t do again in your music career.

Get discouraged.

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Tell us how you ensure your music is engaging.

I try to relate to the listener – probably a bit more than I should. I like to tell stories about times, and places, and experiences and I like to take the listener for a ride. I hope they give it a moment and go with me before hitting skip on the iPod.

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State your opinion on the income from digital streaming.

I wish it were more. Take a look at how other countries allow their musicians to earn a decent wage from making music and then look at where we are. I look at myself personally, and even as an artist I’m not paying any of the major streaming services. Yet, I can find ways to enjoy the songs I like. We just released an EP and I’d rather download my own album and put it on a playlist I love and listen over and over than pay $9.00/month to stream. Maybe I’m old fashioned but give me a record player and some vinyl.

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Suggest ways that artists can make a living.

If you’re truly determined to make it as an original band, then give up all the extraneous bullshit and dedicate your life to playing ALL THE TIME. Music needs to become your life. There’s no fallback plan. You either make it, or you pack it in and get a desk job. Get ready to play shows in empty bars to 4 people but keep at it. Grind.

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Tell that special moment you discovered music.

1992 – Dad’s Ford Ranger, driving down route 62 when Smells Like Teen Spirit came on the radio. It truly changed my life. I was fortunate to have a family that loved and listened to music all the time, and while I dabbled a bit, it wasn’t till that moment when I realized I needed music.

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State your best song and the reason.

Impossible; it really depends on my mood and the moment. Right now, ‘Hurricane’ crushes me because I’m so in love with it. I love the lyrics, emotion and the big chorus. But catch me tomorrow and I might tell you why I love ‘Just So Hard’ instead or Torn Down – Emotionally, that one hits me when I play it live. But I don’t listen to it all the time. Summer is a huge tune that I’m really proud of, but I can’t play it live as well as I want to. ‘Sideways’ might be our best tune, but maybe it’s not my favourite. Keep an ear out for ‘Take Me On.’ That might be my best…. maybe…

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Discuss the difference between recording in a professional studio and home studio.

Not even close. I record my scratch at home. It’s a great place to get ideas, and experiment, but when you get into the real studio then shit gets real. All that blood, sweat and tears are all worth it when some engineers give you the green light and you just let it all out.

 

Emotionally you’ve got to get it all out onto the studio floor or your listener knows it is crap. That’s not to say you can’t record good stuff at home. I have great acoustic solo tracks that are fun, but for me, the studio is where it’s at.

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Tell us how you master your songs.

Thanks to a good friend of mine we discovered Garage Masters in Nashville, TN and we are very satisfied with what we got back. Joe did a great job of communicating with our mix engineer and got what he needed to make it really shine. Don’t skimp on the masters. Find someone to work with you on what you’re looking for.

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Discuss your interaction with your fans.

Hugs. We like giving big sweaty hugs after shows and letting our fans know how much we appreciate them taking time out of their lives to share some time with us. It’s important that the folks that come and support you know that they’re appreciated.

 

Hopefully, we’ve given them enough (other than tinnitus) to send them home with a smile. During the shows, I love feeling the connection to the crowd as we sing along together. I’ll always acknowledge those I see grooving along.

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Tell us how you create the time to promote your music online.

With today’s Social Media influence, you have to set aside time to dedicate yourself to promotion. If you have an hour to practice, now you have 45 minutes to play and 15 minutes to promote.

 

We are at a point where we need stimulation, so for a band, you’ve got to be giving your listeners something new to chew on all the time.

 

Pick the member of your band that is most apt to the current trends and let them roll with it. I focus on writing songs; someone else has to focus on the promo.

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State the tools you know can be of up to a musician.

GarageBand is important to me for jotting down ideas and working with new song structures. I’m learning to practice more with a metronome. I have vocal exercises on my phone that I do every day. Find a routine that works and give it time every day.

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Tell us the project you will run to better the society.

I’m not changing the world with my music. Not yet anyway. The way that I try to better society, is by providing high energy tunes that will brighten someone’s day. I will tell you that I do have the opportunity to work with a group called Banding Together which works with special needs young adults and provides them the learning experiences through music. That experience has changed my life and our life as a band. That is an amazing group and I would encourage anyone of any musical ability to go and spend some time with them.

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Elaborate on the song.

‘Hurricane’ will spin you ‘round, roll your windows down, and have you shouting the chorus as if you aren’t making a sound. It’s a fun tale of frolic and mischief, chasing a dragon you just can’t tame. But damn, you surely did try.

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Elaborate on your artist name and the title of the album.

The Thieves About originated because my son was really into trains. Picking a band name is one of the hardest and lamest things you can put yourself through… So one day with my son we were looking at “Hobo Speak.” When hobo’s ride a train from town to town they leave markings to communicate with other Hobo’s. I noticed the 2/10. It means 2 eyes, 10 fingers… that there are Thieves About, and to use caution. I liked it, and so did the guys so we ran with it.

 

Mobile Version

Colourshop - Katherine

Colourshop – Katherine

 

Colourshop - Katherine

Colourshop – Katherine

 

ARTIST NAME: Colourshop

 

SONG TITLE: Katherine

 

ALBUM TITLE: Katherine

 

RELEASE DATE: 28/05/0219

 

GENRE: Pop

 

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Colourshop is a singer-songwriter one-man band. Italian born, London based Alfredo Salvati moved his first steps in the music world at the age of 10. He took his chances ten years ago when he moved from Rome hills to London.

 

Drawing on influences from the folky harmonies of Neil Young to the honest storytelling of Tracy Chapman, and mixing these with cinematic pedal effects, Colourshop is creating a sound that blends masterfully gentle guitar, melody and rhyme into a soundtrack of poignant millennial longing.

 

In 2014, his song “You & Me” has been pitched and aired by Mark Forrest on BBC Introducing.

 

Colourshop has recently released his last single “Katherine”. The song has been recorded at Aclam Records (Barcelona) with Jason Boshoff (Lisa Hannigan, Bastille, Josh Groban).

 

Overall Colourshop has overcome 3 million streams only on Spotify platform. Colourshop is set to release a collection of new singles throughout 2019.

 

In March 2019, he took part in the Kronplatz Ski Music Festival supporting Tom Walker European tour and he is set to tour California in the summer playing more than 17 dates.

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Tell us what your fans are saying about your music.

My fans really appreciate the honesty and concreteness of my songwriting. My songs talk about real life experiences and I always try to offer interesting views about the world we live in. The topics are never trivial, so I often receive messages from my fans expressing how much they relate to the same situations. They follow with enthusiasm my socials and they are always very responsive when I publish new material.

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Tell us the factors you consider in choosing a song as your favourite.

I like songs that make me think, songs that give me an emotional kick. In such a fast-paced world, it’s good to have something to lean on for five minutes and stop thinking about anything else. Those are usually the songs that I tend to listen over and over, but sometimes, depending on the mood, I don’t mind a lighter and more carefree tune, as long as it has a nice groove.

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Tell us the names of producers you will collaborate with if you have the chance.

I would like to work with Dani Castelar, Paolo Nutini’s producer of Caustic Love. I really love the vibes of his latest album and the way the songs are arranged.

 

The sound is vintage and modern at the same time, the kind of things I like. I also love the sound of Danger Mouse on Michael Kiwanuka debut album: Cold Little Hearts is a masterpiece!

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Tell us the names of the songwriters you will collaborate with if you have the chance.

Damien Rice is one of my all-time favourite artists! I would love to work with him! He is so raw and real, his music was a real inspiration for me.

 

I also love John Mayer; he is so eclectic in his style. He started with pop-rock, then blues, country and so many other musical influences in his songs!

 

I respect him much because he had the courage to pursue his music career independently of what the public might think of his new material and direction. He is also a tremendous guitar player and I would absolutely love to play some music with him!

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Tell us your favourite TV show and state your reason.

I don’t watch much TV; I actually don’t have a TV at home since I moved to the UK, ten years ago. I do enjoy from time to time some good show though. The last one I liked a lot was ‘Narcos.’ The actors were really good and, despite some adaptations, it gives you a good insight into what happened at that time in Colombia and in general in South America. It is a kind of documentary but with some good stories in it. I loved the soundtrack from Rodrigo Amarante – Tuyo, which I covered some time ago. There is a video of it on YouTube.

 

I have not jumped on the Game Of Thrones hype, for some reason the fantasy theme doesn’t appeal me so much but I enjoyed Black Mirror, from Netflix: great food for thought about our society and social media.

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Tell us your best mood to create a song.

I discovered that I am the most productive when I travel. Somehow getting out of the daily routine helps me to condensate my feelings and thoughts to write new material.

 

I am like a sponge that gets soaked and finally can release its content at the right time. That is why I am always taking with me my ‘guitalele’ (a mix between ukulele and guitar) wherever I go. The peak of a mountain, a beach or a quiet balcony in a remote town in Andalusia could offer a great time for creating a new song.

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Tell us your interpretation of fame or success.

The thing I like the most when I think about fame or success is the idea that thousands and thousands of people in front of you would sing your songs out loud.

 

It must be an amazing feeling because it means the message you were trying to convey through your lyrics and music arrived deep down in the soul of so many people. Everyone would relate to the song in a different, personal way and so your song is not yours anymore, it belongs to everyone: that is absolutely beautiful for me!

 

The other aspect I like about success is the fact you would spend much time traveling to so many places around the world, meeting new people, learning new things and knowing new cultures: all this without the hassle of thinking about the logistics, focusing only on your artistic side.

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Tell us the names of artists you will collaborate with if you have the chance.

One thing I would like to do is to write a song for a female singer. Just because I think that the same song has a completely different vibe when a female sings it.

 

One of my favourite artists I would like to collaborate in that sense is Norah Jones.

 

I absolutely love her style: very simple and direct but also sophisticated and elegant, great voice and amazing piano playing.

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Tell us about your experience performing on stage for the first time or recording in the studio for the first time.

My first time on stage was during my school years, I was learning classical guitar and I was about 10.

 

I still remember the composition: ‘Sur le Pont d’Avignon.’ It was a French traditional folk song and I was so excited and scared! Since then I could never live without that adrenaline rush of performing in front of an audience.

 

I started recording in my home studio with very rudimentary equipment so the first time I went to a real studio I was literally overwhelmed by all those lights and buttons; it was too much for me!

 

I remember listening to my own voice back from the speakers for the first time and it was kind of shocking! You are never happy with the result as you have your own voice sound in your head. Let alone the struggle with the tempo, it all sounds good when performing live but when you listen back what you did, you see so many imperfections!

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Tell us how you approach songwriting.

Some people find songwriting an easy process, for me, it is quite the opposite. I need to be in a certain state of mind, in a quiet place and with no distractions around. I would usually spend time playing guitar or piano to find a good melody and rhythm. Only then, I write lyrics that match the mood of the song and sing it along.

 

I am using my phone to record little portions of the song not to forget them and then I move on to the next part.

 

It could take sometimes months to consolidate the whole song; it’s kind of a cathartic process for me.

 

Once the song is ready, I record it properly on my computer and listen to it over and over, asking opinions from my friends and the producers I work with. Finally, I start working out where/how to record it in a real studio.

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Tell us your opinion on blending genres or experimenting with sound.

I am not too obsessed with creating something nobody has ever heard of. Originality for the sake of it is pointless, in my opinion, if it’s not accompanied by a message to be delivered with it.

 

Music is a language and a medium to communicate, hence to do something nobody can understand just for the sake of it doesn’t make sense to me.

 

Although I love to find new sounds and styles using different instruments and tools to add elements that would surprise the listener, like when I used my ‘charango’ ( a South American string instrument I bought in Argentina ) on my single Let me show you how.

 

In general, I would like to work more with other artists to explore new directions and sounds: it is on my To-Do list.

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Tell us how you deal with rejection.

Rejection is an integral part of a musician’s career. We all have to deal with it and over the years I learned how to take advantage of rejections.

 

Instead of being sad about it, I use it as a motivation to work harder and to get better at what I do. I think this is the best way to cope with something that will always be there.

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Elaborate on what compels you to sing.

I cannot really imagine myself without singing or playing music. It is part of my soul since I was a little kid.

 

Sometimes through singing I realize things about me, about life, I find the answers that I was looking for or simply I relax and I feel good after it.

 

I also have to say that sometimes rehearsing for a show could be hard at the end of a busy day and I need to find the strength to do it, but once I start it all comes naturally.

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Tell us the comparison between digital recording and analog recording.

Unfortunately, I did not have a chance yet to try analog recording. I would love to listen to my music on a tape! If I think about the sound of a Studer tape recorder I get goosebumps!

 

I have to say on the other hand that A/D converters these days reached an incredible quality and the sound is so sharp that I cannot complain too much! The main difference to me is that warm feeling you get when listening on analog recorded music or analog supports, that is why I am exploring the possibility to print some vinyl for my next albums.

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Tell us how you record your vocals.

In terms of microphone and preamp, it really depends on the song and vibes I want to give to the recording.

 

When I record the vocals I usually stand in a dark empty room and before starting I meditate and free my mind up. I found out I can only connect with the song’s mood when my mind is empty.

 

At home, I use an AKG 414 with an API preamp replica.

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Tell us the software you used mostly for recording.

I used to record with Cubase or Logic. In the last couple of years, I am mostly using Reaper: a simple open source, free software available online, mostly because it is very simple to use and it allows me to focus on the performance rather than on the “buttons”. I usually record only demos at home and leave the more fine-grain production details to the producer I work with.

 

I found out that working on recording software is a full-time job that requires a lot of studies so I decided to leave it to the professionals.

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Discuss the selling of CDs and selling of digital files through digital stores.

I have to say that if it wasn’t for platforms like Spotify I would have not had the chance to be heard in so many places by so many people. I reached over 3.5 million streams on Spotify only from all over the world. I find this absolutely incredible! Back in the days, you could only achieve this by having a label distributing your CDs in physical stores, which was highly unlikely to happen.

 

I still like the physical support though: the object itself is, in fact, a complementary side of the music contained in it.

 

The paper, the packaging, the photographs, everything contributes to deliver the experience. I still print a number of limited copies of my releases, transforming the CD to a collection piece for my biggest fans to own (and for myself to look at as personal achievement. : )

 

Indeed it is difficult these days to sell CDs since many high-fi systems and PCs do not carry any more CD players unfortunately, vinyl could be a good alternative although more expensive to print.

 

In terms of revenues, I agree with some that say that these digital platforms give little to the artists but, let us be honest, if they weren’t there we would not get any money at all!

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Elaborate on the song.

‘Katherine’ is a song written on a warm night of July in Biarritz, France – The story of a relationship in the span of a night. The lovers look out for each other in the mysterious alleys of the French city, the seduction game symbolized by the chess moves and the final resolution of the morning light that represents a new beginning for both the lovers.

 

I was always fascinated by odd rhythm so I started writing this song in 5/4. This is quite an unusual time signature for a pop tune but it surely contributes to the intriguing atmosphere of the song.

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Elaborate on your artist name and the title of the album.

My artist name, Colourshop, derives from the inspiration that London gave me soon after I arrived in the city.

 

Its multiculturalism was and is a constant source of inspiration for me!

 

Imagine a spice shop, full of colours and flavours: these are my songs or how I imagined them, each one different from the other, and each one representing a different colour I wanted to show to the listeners.

 

Mobile Version

Bob Helfant – Long Life

 

Bob Helfant – Long Life

 

ARTIST NAME:  Bob Helfant

 

SONG TITLE: Long Life

 

ALBUM TITLE: Better Late Than Never

 

RELEASE DATE: 10/29/2018

 

GENRE: Singer/Songwriter/Americana

 

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Tell us when you are most comfortable to sing.

I am most comfortable alone recording and very comfortable performing outdoors.  I recently played the Rock n Roll Marathon in San Diego and felt completely at ease from the first note to the last (2 ½ hour set).

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Tell us what you like to write about in your lyrics.

An idea or phrase comes to me that turns in to the song title – Lonely Without You, Take Me To The Music, etc.  Almost every song is a love song of one kind or another.  Good, bad, frustrated, satisfied.  I’d like to write socially conscious songs and stories, but that isn’t what comes out.

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State your most emotional song and the reason.

Depending on the day, Misery and Miracles – the title of a book by my wife Laura; about very painful parts of her life, Long Life – I came to grips with the end of a long, bad marriage in this song.  I Want To Be In Love – this one touches me in different ways.  It asks the question “what do you want” when you don’t have time to think about it and I/we really want is to be in love.  Is there a feeling better than that?  The song also touches on tragic mistakes made in past lives and how unconscious we are in this life.

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Discuss the process in finding the right sound for your vocals.

I never think of myself as a really good vocalist so the sound I go for is trying to sing on key.  I feel I do best on the rockers like Take Me To The Music where I am focusing and transferring energy more than “singing.”

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State the challenges you have faced as a musician.

Early on the challenge was to record decent demos with no money.  I played clubs from when I was 17 years old.  It was a terrible living in my twenties – So much so that I found other work in my thirties but kept playing and writing.

 

In the past ten years, quality recording and mixing became more possible at home.  I worked as an assistant engineer for a few years way back and that helped me understand sound well enough to make a recording at home.

 

On this CD ‘Better Late Than Never’ I recorded all the drum and bass tracks at a studio and most of the vocals and guitar tracks in my home studio.  I mixed and mastered it at home.

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Tell us your opinion on how artists should raise funds for their music projects.

When the band didn’t have enough money to record, we joined up with an engineer who recorded us for no charge in hopes of getting a piece of possible sales and publishing.  It didn’t work out financially but we did have a single on the radio in NYC for a while.  Don’t be afraid to partner with people who have what you don’t have, connections and money.

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Tell us about the present state of your fan base.

Very small – Let’s make it bigger.  Some people have been listening to my songs since the ’80s and others have come on board in the past few years.

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Tell us if you consider sharing your music with the world or a specific geographical zone.

I would love to share my music with any and all in the world.

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State the title of your best song and share the link.

Here are two of my favorites.  I don’t have any live videos from the ‘Better Late Than Never’ CD.  These go back to one I recorded before that one.

 

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Time Flies

 

Outside View

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Tell us your greatest supporter.

This may sound corny but it was my mother who always found a way to pay for guitar lessons, for another amp or a PA system to keep me playing, learning and growing.

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Tell us the artists that have impacted you.

I am a product of all the great musicians and writers who I watched and listened to over and over that fed my desire to write and play – from Django and Stephane to Charlie Christian to B.B. King, Albert King, Elvis, The Beatles, The Stones, Jimi, Robbie Robertson, Stephen Bruton, Albert Lee, John Prine, Kris Kristofferson, Dylan, Randy Newman, Lucinda Williams, Paul Simon and I could fill pages with all the rest.

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Describe the listeners that listen to your music.

They are the best people and most discerning listeners.

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Tell us many ways of generating revenue as an artist.

This is something I have no clue about.  I know people who do it successfully, mostly by writing, recording and then licensing the music for TV or movies.  I feel like I am looking at it from the wrong end of a telescope – “the wrong end of a telescope” sounds like a song title.  I’ll start work on it this weekend.

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Tell us the future of the music business.

The business itself has changed drastically in my life.  Acts used to come up through the clubs.  Record labels developed artists.  I don’t know what the business is now.  I’ve tried to get artists to listen to my songs but they get rejected without anyone listening.  I have a “close” family in the business and can’t get them to try to move a song.  It’s a miracle every time a writer or artist breaks through.

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Discuss the gains and losses of technology to the music business.

I have been in it since studios ran tape machines, just at the beginning of guitar effects.  It is much easier to get the sound you want now, but you still need a song to play.  Technology has made “sonic perfection” the goal which can take the life out of a track.  I have found early mixes of my songs that sound much better in terms of communicating energy and emotion than the final mix.  My favourite recordings are generally from the days before digital editing.  Listen to Linda Ronstadt’s Blue Bayou or any Beatle’s recording.  They relied on the performance and material, not on an audio version of Photoshop to make a track sound better.

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Tell us if you still make CDs of your release.

Yes, I do – Available on CD Baby.

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Tell us your definition of a song.

The song is the foundation.  It can stand alone with a single instrument and voice or grow with instrumentation and arrangement.  The lyrics are the start of every song for me.  I want to hear about what the writer is saying.  The best writers can give you years of life in a sentence.  “I have a picture of another man’s wife tattooed on my arm” John Prine.

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Elaborate on your artist name and the title of the album.

My name is my name.  Pertaining to the title of the album, I went through a hundred or more titles and bounced them off my wife and kids before narrowing it down to “Better Late Than Never”.  I got pretty ill before it was done and was worried that I wouldn’t be able to finish this CD.  Some of the songs were written decades ago but never recorded to my satisfaction – Better late than never.

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Send a message to those involved in helping you with this project.

Some of these songs have been around since the 1970s. Others were written as recently as this year. I have been waiting sometimes patiently, sometimes less so for the opportunity to record them. When I finally got down to it, it was my pleasure to work with such great artists on this collection of songs. Jason Smith, Lance Morrison, Kristen Toedtman, Doug Snyder, Harry Helfant, Tom Weir, Rich Friedman, Doug Livingston and 5 Veterans from New Directions, Inc. Thank you for taking time for this project and I look forward to working with you again on the next one. I will take this opportunity to thank my friend Del Casher for inventing my favourite guitar pedal – the Wah, and Geoffrey Teese, Dan Albrecht and Roger Mayer for perfecting it. Thank you, Mike Piera, for making so many of the boxes that help shape my sound. Thank you, Lindy Fralin, for the hand wound pickups.  Thank you Jimmy D’Aquisto (posthumously) for keeping my guitars excellent when I was younger and Jim Foote for the past 20 years for keeping my guitars playing perfectly. I hope you all enjoy listening to it as much as I enjoyed making it.

 

Mobile Version

Los Fiascos – Stitch

Los Fiascos – Stitch

 

Los Fiascos – Stitch

Los Fiascos – Stitch

 

ARTIST NAME: Los Fiascos

 

SONG TITLE:  Stitch

 

ALBUM TITLE: Nomadic

 

RELEASE DATE: June 18, 2019

 

GENRE:  Punk/Ska

 

Spotify

 

Apple Music

 

iTunes

 

CD Baby

 

Reverbnation

 

Website

 

Los Fiascos is a project by songwriter, Aaron Hanlon, based out of Phoenix.

 

The songs are written across the alternative, punk, ska, and reggae genres and typically have both some throwback elements mixed with modern production.

 

Each song is conceived as a single and typically not grouped within an ‘album or collection’ which gives Los Fiascos the freedom to bring different sounds.

 

Los Fiascos spends significant time with fellow musicians, bloggers, and playlisters to both promote songs and get feedback/ideas for new tracks.

 

While the new songs are written by Aaron, each track typically has guest musicians from the US, Canada, UK, Germany, Italy, Brazil, and Argentina.

 

Los Fiascos is designed to be a modern, social project. All songs are free on CD Baby and available on all streaming platforms and proceeds from streams are donated to 350.org.

 

Los Fiascos are published and distributed by Summer Sessions Releases.

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Discuss how you find the sounds that fit your vocals.

I typically start with a riff and then build the song around a riff.  Then I add in a top-line melody with pacing with keys.  Once I have that together I write lyrics that fit the mood of the riff and top-line.

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Tell us how you come up with ideas to create your lyrics.

I usually write about broad emotions, situations or topics so the listener can apply his/her own meaning or interpretation to the song.

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Tell us how you ensure the music producer balances your vocals with the instrumentals properly.

I produce the songs so I make sure it is to my liking, but then I also get feedback from other musicians.

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Discuss the recording process of this song.

This song is a little different from my other songs because it is slower and has a repetitive groove. I wrote it on acoustic guitar first and then sat on it for a year or two before returning to the studio to finish it.

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Tell us your experience recording the vocals.

These were fun vocals to record because they were spoken more than sung.

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Tell us how you ensure your songs sound well.

I write for me, so if they sound good to me, that would be enough… but I also get feedback from other musicians and the people that regularly listen to my music or genre.

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State the best means of generating income in today’s music business.

My motive isn’t income.  I just enjoy making music, giving it away for free (see CD Baby) and hopefully someone will listen besides me.

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State the people involved in creating this song and their roles.

I write the songs, but I will get friends and fellow musicians that can play better than me to record the instrumentation.  I record the vocals and sometimes will also do the bass or guitar.

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Explain how you get involved in music.

Concerts, social, collaborations.

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State your favourite song and the reason.

I don’t really have a favourite song, but I’m really into the reggae rock genre right now.

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Tell us your opinion on the use of digital effects on vocals.

I typically don’t like autotune, but if there’s a spot for echo or overdrive that adds to the song or mood, then I do it.

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Explain the relevance of creativity to music.

Creativity and music are one and the same to me.

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Tell us the steps to take before going into the studio to record.

I write the song, record a demo, revise the structure, and then record.

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Tell us what you know about your fans.

I don’t think I have fans.  The people that like my music are usually into the genre’s I play and like seeking out new artists.

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Tell us if you see music as a rewarding career.

Music isn’t my career, it’s my entertainment.

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Tell us what you will do apart from music.

Spend time with friends, family and of course my career.

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Tell us if you will prefer to watch a movie to listening to music.

I prefer music because you can do so much more while listening to music.

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Elaborate on the song.

The single ‘Stitch’ is a vibey track with a punk rock edge that explores the emotion of carrying on and moving forward after making a bad decision.

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Elaborate on your artist name and the title of the album.

Los Fiascos was the original name of a punk band I was in in the early ’00s and I continued to use the name.  The EP is titled Nomadic.  Nomadic is about moving from place to place and if you listen to the three songs, they move from genre to genre.

 

Mobile Version

Finja – Calling You Home

Finja – Calling You Home

 

Finja – Calling You Home

Finja – Calling You Home

 

Finja – Calling You Home

 

ARTIST NAME: Finja

 

SONG TITLE: Calling You Home

 

RELEASE DATE: 25th May 2019

 

GENRE: Indie Folk

 

Instagram

 

Apple Music

 

iTunes

 

Spotify

 

Bandcamp

 

FINJA is the creator of original songs inspired by life, love, and spirit.

 

Her intention is to uplift you out of time and place, moving you into a state of joy and empowerment.

 

She believes in the virtue of music as medicine and its inherent ability to bypass the noise of the head and be received in the heart.

 

Her bold and buoyant message is expressed through her music and the way she lives life.

 

May you feel inspired to deliberately create a life you love and realize your limitless potential.

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Tell us when you are most comfortable to sing.

Driving! On the open road, windows rolled down, wind in my hair, stereo turned up, kids in the back…I sound and feel amazing!

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Tell us what you like to write about in your lyrics.

Consciousness – I tune into an emotional state that I have experienced (usually a heavier one like grief, doubt, and insecurity) and I tell a story that takes the listener up the emotional scale until we reach a state of joy, upliftment, and empowerment.

 

A good story takes its audience on a journey from a place of depth (problem) to a feeling of freedom (solution) while defeating the villain (adversity) in the process.

 

I try to incorporate this narrative arch in my songs. The intention behind my lyrics is to remind my listeners, and myself, that our power and potential as humans is limitless.

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State your most emotional song and the reason.

It’s yet to be recorded, but it’s actually the first song I ever wrote. It’s called ‘My All, My One’ and I wrote it in the weeks after the devastating news that my former partner, and father of my firstborn child, committed suicide. I still choke up when I sing it; not because I am currently experiencing the pain of grief, but because the song taps me back into that emotional space.

 

The song has moody jazz feel in the verses, describing the pain of shattered dreams, and an uplifting dreamy pop vibe in the chorus, speaking to the eternal love that can exist between two souls.

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Discuss the process in finding the right sound for your vocals.

I have a classical background having trained in violin and piano for fifteen years in my youth. But my teenage dream was to be on Broadway, singing and dancing in musicals. Either that or a jazz singer in a smoky back alley club!

 

In my twenties, I was obsessed with drum ‘n’ bass female MC’s and vocalists, and later, after my party years, I swooned over soothing mantras and medicine songs that feature in plant medicine ceremonies.

 

Now I’m in my thirties and have finally given myself permission to sing from a non-technical, untrained place and to songwrite just for the pure love of it. The sound I embody is a mixture of all of the above. My vocals are smooth-sounding with a particular focus on harmonies and have been described as being rather ‘theatrical.’

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State the challenges you have faced as a musician.

Actually just starting! Coming from a past of classical training I felt embroiled in a world of technique, precision and immaculate performance of a piece of music that was written by someone else, hundreds of years ago.

 

I felt boxed in, having to express my musicality according to how a school of thought believed it should be expressed. Also, the thought of improvisation and intuitive composition was one hell of a scary idea and I did not know how to unlock the door into that realm. I could read music before I could read words, but I really envied those musicians who could play and create off-the-cuff and by ear alone.

 

As I was going through my ‘dark night of the soul’ and wrote my first song, I played it to a peer singer-songwriter whom I looked up to and received words of praise and encouragement in return. And so began the process of overcoming the fear of rejection from others. Pretty soon I felt brave enough to approach a producer, expose the inner-workings of my heart and mind (though the subject matter of my lyrics) and begin recording, which is oh-so-rewarding!

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Tell us your opinion on how artists should raise funds for their music projects.

Hmm, great question and a much-needed discussion! However, I don’t feel my opinion holds much weight as my experience is very different from the usual tale of a hardworking, on-the-road musician. Since I began songwriting and recording, I’ve been living the life of a mother and housewife (or as I like to call it, a space of love creator).

 

But I have learned a thing or two from my entrepreneurial husband. When starting off I think it’s wise to be Clarke Kent by day and Superman by night. That way, you can ensure you’re not ‘in-the-red’ struggling to make ends meet; you can save and budget for your recording costs and you have the benefit of learning how to handle (keep and grow) your money, before making it big time in the industry (where you potentially will have a lot more wealth to manage).

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Tell us the present state of your fan base.

Ooh, this one makes me laugh (and kind of shy away!). It’s very small. My kids, husband, family and close friends and the rest are unknowns (though dearly appreciated).

 

I wrote my first song less than two years ago, and have just released my first single. I haven’t toured or played any gigs as of yet. I’m a stay at home mum with a five-year-old and a six-month-old baby. But what matters to me, is that I don’t use any of these supposed “limitations” stop me from doing what I feel passion for.

 

And, I have my first gig booked where I’m playing at an amazing conscious festival in New Zealand, NY Resolution, at the end of this year, and again early next year for NZ Spirit Fest. Totally stoked to make my debut performance!

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Tell us if you consider sharing your music with the world or a specific geographical zone.

The world, baby! (We are one, after all)…

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Tell us your genre of your music.

I have an Indie-Folk sound with influences ranging from Blues, Acoustic, Soul, Jazz, and Conscious Pop.

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State the title of your best song.

Calling You Home.

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Tell us your greatest supporter.

That would be my husband Sebastian. He truly sees the boundless nature within me and holds me in this loving space (no matter how moody I can be).

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Tell us the artists that have impacted you.

I’m truly inspired by the great Harry Nillson. I think his songwriting skills and ability to tell a story is phenomenal. I’m also very inspired that he was able to reach so many people, yet never went on tour!

 

I have a nostalgic love of The Carpenters, particularly Karen’s smooth and soothing vocals, and again their ability to tell a good story through their lyrics.

 

I just love how successful Bjork’s career has been – not in spite of, but because of her quirkiness. Her voice is one of the soundtracks to my teenage years.

 

I embrace Rising Appalachia and their wonderful work at bringing sexy back to multi-harmonies, and their hybrid mix of genres.

 

As far as EDM goes, I love some Tinlicker and Black Sun Empire for when I’m in a banging mood (my current dream is to guest vocalist for both!).

 

And my most played artist on Spotify would have to be Trevor Hall…

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Describe the listeners that listen to your music.

I would say they are folks who are more in the “conscious” or spiritual scene, due to the nature of my lyrics. I’m also a publisher on Insight Timer, the world’s #1 Meditation App, so I tend to attract people who have a desire to explore self-development and practices in mindfulness.

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Tell us the future of the music business.

I love this one – it’s a topic that constantly ticks over in the back of my mind. Simply put, it will be all about the EXPERIENCE an artist can offer. I really see VR (virtual reality) and AR (augmented reality) playing a BIG part in this. I intend to embrace this move as I believe it creates much freedom for the artist. Just think you could produce a visually-sonically mesmerizing concert from the comfort of your own home each week, at very little cost. All without the need to constantly be away on tour. How exceptional, for new artists who have chosen to stay at home, like me – Just watch the film Ready Player One for more inspo on this…

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Discuss the gains and losses of technology to the music business.

What comes to mind is autotune. Call me old fashioned, but I believe in the value of developing your skill as a vocalist or a musician, and pitch and intonation is a huge part of that! For me, autotune takes the soul out of the music, and the virtuosity out of the musician.

 

Then again, how amazing that we don’t have to necessarily spend hours and hours of practice perfecting our pitch and technique. This means we can create and produce more music at a much faster turnaround rate.

 

Either way, it’s all good. Some people love autotune, others not so much. Luckily there is enough supply to cater for both preferences.

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Tell us if you still make CDs of your release.

I actually have never thought about it, which means, no. I, myself, wouldn’t even have a way to play it if I did!

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Elaborate on the song.

‘Calling You Home’ is a beautiful lullaby sung from your inner being to you. It serves as a reminder of your divinity and gently empowers you with the knowledge that you can do, be, have whatever you want – courtesy of the most powerful law in the universe, the law of attraction.

 

 

I usually advise my listeners to treat this song as you would a guided meditation. Lie down, close your eyes and take five minutes to marinate in the uplifting essence of source that is Calling You Home.

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Elaborate on your artist name and the title of the album.

FINJA- I was born Fiona, but never felt it was the name for me (Sorry mum, you really got that one wrong!).

 

Coming from Australia where we love to abbreviate every word possible, I go by Fi. One day I learned that the Gaelic boys name Fionn is actually pronounced Finn. Somehow my mind put it together that the correct pronunciation of Fiona would be “Finyah”. Then I found the name “Finja” is a legit Nordic name. I have Irish and Danish roots (yup, according to my family tree I’m a real-deal Viking), so it feels and sounds better for me.

 

Calling You Home – Simply put, Calling You Home is an action performed always and in all ways from your source / higher-self / god / inner-being, to remind you of your greatness and to help you stay centered in any situation.

 

Mobile Version

Celine Love – Rose Coloured

Celine Love – Rose Coloured

 

Celine Love – Rose Coloured

Celine Love – Rose Coloured

 

Celine Love – Rose Coloured

 

Facebook

 

Amazon

 

Spotify

 

Celine Love is a young singer-songwriter from Hamburg who relocated to London in 2016.

 

She creates soulful folk, composing music with expressionism and self-discovery at its core with a hint of socio-critical commentary.

 

She is currently working on her first release ‘Rose Coloured’: “The idea behind ‘Rose Coloured’ was to capture memories, moments and situations that describe the blissful ignorance of my childhood – The desire to put a ‘rose coloured’ filter on everything that is bad in the world.

 

Before racism, insecurities, heartbreak or stress became part of life the world is not only on your side but shields you from the negativity.

 

The imagery within the song is directly taken from my memories. Writing and recording it left me feeling very nostalgic, so I dug out old photos and songs and reached out to my childhood best friend. It reminded me of a pivotal time as a child, before I became aware of the differences in skin colour and hair structure. Not only did I look different from most of the German kids surrounding my life but I would be treated differently too. It wasn’t always negative, but always in a way that made me feel excluded.

 

There was a time before I became aware that my skin colour was nothing but ‘caramel’ and everyone else was simply ‘vanilla’- Nothing more. ‘Rose Coloured’ is an almost desperate wish to have that mindset back – The wish to live in a ‘fool’s paradise’.

 

The music video (directed by Sylvia Hong) explores how that darkness we are shielded from as children, was always there. A lot of us may think back to our childhood as perfect when truly we have blocked out the negative we might have seen or experienced. If we do not confront these issues from the past, it can drive you insane.” – Celine Love

 

A few milestones in her young career include a full scholarship to the music school BIMM Berlin & London, performing at festivals such as the 2000 Trees in Cheltenham, Kings Jam in Gloucester, Deichbrand and Reeperbahn Festival in Germany and supporting the electro-pop band Years & Years in Hamburg for NRJ Radio.

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Discuss your recording experience with your producer.

I was happy to have produced most of the song before working with Malaki Patterson and Grove. This meant we could focus on what was missing, what needed to be fixed and rerecorded and partially rearranged. Grove is a multi-instrumental, vocal and production talent and having them on the track quickly perfected all the problem zones. Both Malaki and Grove made me feel very comfortable and brought out the best in my vocals.

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Discuss what comes first and last while creating a song.

For me, 90% of the time lyrics come first. This is simply how I got used to writing from before I played any instruments or could produce my own music. Wordplay, metaphors, rhyming, and storytelling is what defines me as an artist. Last usually come percussion in an arrangement for me, if there is any. Possibly even the full melody since I change melodies a lot even when production is already done.

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Tell us the piece of advice you will give to a new artist.

I wish I would’ve put less pressure on myself when it comes to ‘finding my sound’ or fitting in a category that is easy to explain to people. Now I just write and produce without focusing on if the song is for me or not. If it feels like me I use it and if it doesn’t, I don’t or can hopefully pass it on to someone else. So that is what I would suggest to other artists finding themselves.

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Discuss your worse experience in the music business.

Luckily I have not had anything horrible or anything that fully threw me off my game happen but I am sure I will encounter situations that are less pleasant in the future. Just have to prepare my mind for it. I have also been surrounded by the industry since I was a kid so maybe I am also used to certain things.

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Tell us how you deal with rejection.

Of course rejections and others doubting you, it is not easy and it knocks me back sometimes but ultimately also leads me to want to prove people wrong. I lick my wounds for a while (or binge watch half of Netflix’s content) and also decide whether or not the rejection meant something or not. It is important to recognize constructive criticism but also when there is nothing you can or should do.

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Tell us what you are doing to impact the people around you.

I think I genuinely try to make people happy if I can. Maybe it is part of my Aquarian nature (if that stuff is even real); maybe it’s my parents, maybe both. But I think the fact that I try to spread positivity where I can and doing little good deeds throughout the day, like writing a note for an upset stranger on the tube, hearing out someone who needed to be heard or even writing a lyric that I know could help someone else out.

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Tell us the music that makes you happy.

I am so split in the middle with this. On the one hand, I love cleverly written, nuanced lyrics by the likes of Jeff Buckley, Hozier, or Lianne La Havas. On the other also any mainstream pop song Benny Blanco, Julia Micheals or Max Martin has ever written and gets stuck in my head immediately.

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Tell us how you make instrumentation to your song.

I am not exactly the most technically diverse musician. I like to keep things simple and write on guitar or piano. Often I play chords I don’t even know. Like with ‘Rose Coloured’. It might be embarrassing but I do not know any of the chords in that song. Literally none – But I can play it…

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Tell us how you feel when you sing and your fans sing along to your song.

It’s both amazing and slightly stressful, to be honest. If I can hear the audience properly and it’s an intimate space it feels very special when the audience sings along.

 

But in bigger spaces you often cannot see or hear much and unless the crowd is really loud or you see them mouthing the words you cannot always tell if people are really singing along or not.

 

I once opened for Years & Years in Germany for example and thought no one had sung along but all my friends in the audience pointed out how cool it was that everyone did. I just couldn’t hear and did not have my glasses on to see them sing.

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Tell us the goals you aim to achieve when creating a song.

I hope people remember at least some parts of the lyrics. That is always what I most pleased with when people point it out. I also like weird sounds and unexpected effects in the productions and finding a way to make my music sound ‘different’ is something I aim to achieve.

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State your approach to writing.

I usually write little paragraphs or even just words I like the sound of anywhere and anytime. Sometimes I will even stop conversations and write things down. Then when I have the time to finish a whole song I’ll go back to those little notes and arrange them to make sense.

 

Often lyrics don’t get used until months or even years later. I have had situations where I used the same lyric in different songs to see where it fits the best.

 

The lyrics in ‘Rose Coloured’ were spread across three different songs at first until I decided to mix them all together.

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Tell us how you plan to develop a unique music style.

My writing and production process is a bit unique I believe and out of default also dictates the style I gravitate towards. Because I am not the most developed producer or musician in a technical sense I use samples and minimalist instrumental elements a lot.

 

My voice is the best instrument I have and I love stacking harmonies and adlibs in ways you would usually use more percussion or more intricate chords.

 

My sound developed from laziness to purposefully scaling back on production and carefully placing elements that allow you to focus on the voice and the lyrics.

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Tell us how to record a song.

Everyone has their way of doing things but I personally like having as much as possible prerecorded in my bedroom. Even if I then go into the studio and have to do everything again at least I had the vision, to begin with.

 

Sometimes the guide recordings of my guitar or vocals even end up staying because it made the song more interesting than a fully engineered recording.

 

I can only suggest it to everyone to be capable of recording your own demos to a certain extent. It also helps me to explain my ideas better if I am nervous, just tired or simply cannot find the right words.

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Tell us if you are collaborating with other songwriters or you write alone.

Personally, I prefer at least starting my own songs alone. Usually when I write a song from scratch with others without having brought anything it doesn’t feel right. Even if we do change everything, starting by myself helps me feel like I have a bit of control. This is only for my own songs. If I am simply songwriting with other people I like having other input from the start as well.

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Discuss your experience with fans.

Well, they either gave birth to me or lived with me for 18 years so what can I say, they are loyal. In all seriousness, I am still young in the game so I have had the occasional 5-year-old come to me after a festival asking for an autograph but my actual fan base will hopefully exist with my first music releases.

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Brief us about booking gigs and shows.

Playing live regularly in the early stages is a bumpy ride – One day I will be playing the main stage at the Roundhouse in London and the next I am asking for tips at a pub where no one but ‘drunk Becky’ really paid attention.

 

It is hard to know when to turn down gigs that you feel like you’ve outgrown and it can also be scary to play bigger shows where there is more at stake.

 

It is hard to get people to come down though, especially when you’re playing more than 2-3 gigs a month in the same city.

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Tell us if you consider a song placement in TV or Film.

I would absolutely love to see my songs placed. When watching movies or series I often pay attention to the music I can only hope I’ll get the chance to hear my songs alongside one of the billion shows I watch.

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Elaborate on the song.

‘Rose Coloured’ is a song reminiscent of my childhood and wanting to enjoy life through a lens that filters out any social pressures or ideas of evil in the world. All of the imagery in the song is taken directly from my own memories.

 

Growing up in Germany there was a time when I saw my skin colour as nothing but ‘caramel’, everyone else was simply ‘vanilla’. I did not know about racism, poverty or jealousy until I had some sort of confrontation with it. Once you know these things exist you can never unknow it. Sometimes I wish I could live in a ‘fool’s paradise.’

 

As far as the composition goes, I was hoping to write a song with a strong sense of a hook and a chorus which not all of my songs have and since the story is so important to me I focused more on the lyrics and less on changing chord progressions etc. since the song felt and diverse enough.

 

It felt like the perfect song for my single debut since it really describes how my mind works and how I am a positive person with a lot of dark thoughts.

 

Mobile Version