Orchestra Fuego - Vengan Todos A Bailar

Orchestra Fuego

 

Orchestra Fuego - Vengan Todos A Bailar

Orchestra Fuego – Vengan Todos A Bailar

 

ARTIST NAME: Orchestra Fuego

 

SONG TITLE: Vengan Todos A Bailar

 

ALBUM TITLE: Vengan Todos A Bailar

 

RELEASE DATE: May 25, 2019

GENRE: Latino

 

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Discuss your approach to music production.

We compose and produce all of our songs and although we’re a high energy Salsa band, our songs are made for the Salsa dance lover. The tempo is everything to us.

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Elaborate on how you come up with your lyrics.

I usually come up with a topic and one of our singer friends who also performs with the band, then take it from there and develops the song; we then listen and tweak and arrange it.

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Discuss your songwriting process.

Songwriting is pretty simple for us since we have a deep passion for what we do. Our composer can come up with lyrics to just about anything; I mean this guy could write a song about a pencil…

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Tell us about your next project.

We just released our new album titled “Vengan Todos A Bailar” and we’re now getting ready to shoot our next music video.

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Tell us what you won’t do again in your music career.

Hum, that’s a tough one, since we learn from our mistakes and these are the things that get us to the next level musically. I wouldn’t change a thing. I have had the blessings of having the same band members for the past four years, which is very difficult these days with the scarcity of venues to perform.

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Tell us how you ensure your music is engaging.

We’re on all the social media platforms and along with YouTube’s reporting; it gives me an idea of what works and doesn’t work, so I continue making adjustments to help engage our fans. We are the most sought after Latin band in the Tampa, Orlando area.

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Tell us your definition of harmony in music.

With a full Orchestra, Piano, Bass, Timbales, Congas, Bongos, Trombone, Baritone Sax, Two Trumpets, three singers, harmony is where we excel. Arranging all the different parts is challenging, but we try to bring out the best in each instrument.

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State your opinion on the income from digital streaming.

This is a hard subject for most musicians; recording albums have become just an expensive business card these days. With the availability of sharing music, it’s hard to make money on sales of your music. But I’m an optimist; I believe that this is something that can change by eliminating the sharing component so that everyone has to pay for digital downloads.

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Tell us the ways that artists can make a living.

Bring CDs to all your shows; I make extra money at all my shows selling my CDs. Also merchandise, like T-shirts and coffee cups; there are many services that can make T-shirts fairly inexpensive; doesn’t have to be extreme, keep it simple so you can make a profit.

 

Also, email your fans at least every other month to keep them engaged; monthly is best. You can even send coupons to sell you material; 2 CDs for a discount.

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Tell that special moment you discovered music.

That was many years ago while I was in college; I saw a small group of guys jamming at my student center playing Salsa and I was hooked!

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State your best song and the reason.

One of the best songs from my new album is ‘Si Te Vas’- it’s a story about a guy leaving his girlfriend and how she shrugs it off and keeps her head up. The lyrics and arrangement are just fabulous.

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Discuss the difference between recording in a professional studio and home studio.

I have recorded in commercial recording studios in the past and we have just built our own studio from a Shed! Ground up! And with the proper equipment and great engineer, can’t tell the difference. Home studios are becoming very popular and you save a lot of money in the end.

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Tell us how you master your songs.

We have a good friend in Connecticut who has mastered our last two albums and this guy is awesome. He does mastering for some of the best Salsa artists in the market.

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Discuss your interaction with your fans.

During our performances, we love to interact with our fans and we’re constantly reaching out to our fans through social media.

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Tell us how you create the time to promote your music online. You have to set out time for this; it’s an important part of the business. Most musicians hate this part of it and just want to do what they do best, which is performing, but you need to make time to catch up with fans and stay in touch. I like to do this in the morning before my day gets busy.

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State how you coordinate the musicians in your band.

That’s a tough one as well; although I have been extremely blessed to have some great musicians in my band, you also need to be a strong leader and not leave too many things up to musicians to make decisions; like rehearsals, you can’t just assume they are practicing their parts, you have to get in their face sometimes and let them know they need to look at the charts way before the rehearsals so that they don’t waste time at rehearsals.

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Tell us the project you will run to better the society.

My goal is to bring Salsa music back to its glory days. Salsa music has been on the back burner for way too many years and once I’m done with the Orchestra Fuego project, I would like to produce other upcoming artists.

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Elaborate on the song.

‘Vengan Todos A Bailar’ is one of the songs in our album and also the title of the album and it’s made for the Salsa dancer; not too fast, not too slow, just right for the avid Salsa dancer. We will be shooting our new music video for this song.

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Elaborate on your artist name and the title of the album.

I started playing music back in the late ’70s to ’80s when Salsa was at its peak; went to college, became a CPA, then about 4 years ago, re-kindled my love for music and started Orchestra Fuego; my initial thought was to bring back that hot and spicy Salsa rhythm to the music scene.

 

So Fuego (fire in Spanish) was what I wanted the band to perform like; hot and spicy and that’s what separates us from the other local bands; great musicians but they just stand there performing; our band is constantly moving; my singers are dancing in the front; on fire!

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Share your press release and review with us.

Press

 

Orchestra Fuego is a sensational Salsa band that performs both original and familiar Latin songs with invigorating new arrangements.

 

Based in Tampa Bay, Florida this twelve-piece live orchestra presents an ear-pleasing and visually alluring performance that magnifies their impressive presentation style.

 

These seasoned musicians with over two decades of experience produce a sizzling show—and the band’s dynamic, high energy sound dominates every stage they play on.

 

Orchestra Fuego delivers a vast and versatile repertoire of songs that includes Salsa – their first love – Merengue, Bachata, Bolero, Cha-cha and more.

 

Their hot Latin passion is on fire and can be felt through their expressive enthusiasm and high energy levels everywhere they perform.

 

A sole piano player’s relocation to a new state marks the origins of Orchestra Fuego.

 

Director and frontman Marcus Hernandez was a veteran performer on the New York City scene in the late ’70s and ’80s at the peak of the Salsa movement with Latin music running deep in his veins.

 

When Hernandez relocated to Florida from New York, he was fueled by two things:  an abiding interest in Salsa and a passion for bringing this sensational Latin sound to his new home state.

 

This quest led to seeking out and performing with other Salsa aficionados in the area, and these original musicians are all now members of Orchestra Fuego.

 

“After playing a few gigs,’’ laments Hernandez, “it became evident early on that the time was ripe to revive the classic Salsa sound in central Florida.”

 

Five years later, these same seasoned musicians have grown together and become a family rich with Latin heritage which makes for a tight sounding, ultra-professional band.

 

It is this cohesiveness that contributes to Orchestra Fuego being one of the most sought out Salsa groups in the Central Florida area.

 

Consisting of three singers, percussionists, brass musicians, a pianist, and a bass guitarist, their blend of Afro-Cuban rhythms mixed with Nuyorican flavour has maintained the integrity of what is referred to as “Old School Salsa or New York City Salsa,” complemented by a fresh twist.

 

Since their debut in 2014, Orchestra Fuego has ignited a myriad of dance floors throughout Florida with their upbeat, high energy performances.

 

Additionally, their first album, Encendido, has world-wide download coverage including on the domestic U.S. scene, internationally in the European market, and spanning the Pacific to the far reaches of Singapore.

 

Audiences everywhere agree that Orchestra Fuego’s danceable beats bring energy and exciting entertainment to any occasion, causing people to rush to the dance floor the moment the music begins.

 

Comfortable playing to crowds that number in the thousands or at intimate social gatherings, this versatile group expertly performs in a wide range of entertainment venues from nightclubs and restaurants to country clubs and large corporate events.

And their enthusiastic fan following in Central Florida has deftly positioned them to become beloved by audiences well beyond the borders of the state.

In addition to performing live shows, Orchestra Fuego is also working on several recording projects.

 

They have released four albums Encendido, Salsa Brava, Quemando La Pista, and our newest album, “Vengan Todos A Bailar.”

 

They are also currently producing their fourth music video.

Orchestra Fuego has won best Latin Song of the Year at the Elite Entertainment Music Awards and has been nominated for Best Latin Album at the Independent Music Awards.

 

“We really enjoy performing and watching others appreciate our music,” shares Marcus, “and we are eager to bring our sound around the world.”

Marcus Hernandez Musical Director and Founder  Composer, pianist, and Salsa aficionado, Marcus Hernandez was born with an affinity for Latin music that can surely be traced to the very molecules of his DNA.

 

Growing up in the boroughs of New York City, he was heavily influenced by two local Latin greats: the Grammy Award-winning pianist Eddie Palmieri and Puerto Rican Salsa legend Willie Rosario.

 

Their distinct styles cultivated his love for Salsa which led him to learn and master the piano at a young age.

 

In his early years as a musician, Marcus studied under Oscar Hernandez and Gilberto Colon, and more recently with Arturo Ortiz, who was the musical director for the Ricky Martin Band and Victor Romero who has played piano for almost all the top Latin Artist.

 

Hernandez himself emerged on the New York City Latin scene during the late ’70s when the Salsa movement was at an all-time high.  A major highlight of his New York career was forming the Salsa group Fuego ’77.

 

The band recorded its first album of the same name, Fuego ’77, under the Alegre label, a subsidiary of the famous Fania Records, and Hernandez composed and arranged eight of the ten songs on the album.

 

Fuego ‘77 became an in-demand supporting act opening for mega Salsa artists such as Celia Cruz, Johnny Pacheco, and Hector Lavoe.

 

The band’s resume included performances at all the top Manhattan Salsa venues including The Corso, Ipanema, Casa Blanca, Casino 14, and the iconic Copa Cabana.

As his career flourished into the 1980s, Hernandez continued performing and working with various popular Latin artists such as Adalberto Santiago and Rafael de Jesus.

After taking a break from performing to focus on a business career, Hernandez moved to Florida in 2005 and found a tropical, steamy paradise ripe for the simmering sounds of Salsa.

 

His new surroundings provided inspiration for his current project, Orchestra Fuego, which has become one of the most sought out Salsa groups in the Central Florida area.

 

And after more than forty years on the Salsa scene, Marcus Hernandez is more enthusiastic than ever about composing his own original music and sharing his lively and refreshing arrangements of classic Salsa songs with audiences worldwide.

 

Special Recognitions:

Orchestra Fuego recently won best Latin song on the Akademia Music Awards

Orchestra Fuego won best Latin Music Video on Making Music Magazine

Orchestra Fuego winner of 2018 Best Salsa Song of the Year on the Atlas Elite Entertainment Awards.

 

 

Mobile Version

Green Knucle Material - Queen of Dragons

Green Knuckle Material

 

Green Knucle Material - Queen of Dragons

Green Knucle Material – Queen of Dragons

 

ARTIST NAME: Green Knuckle Material + Danny Evans

 

SONG TITLE:  Queen of Dragons

 

RELEASE DATE: 4/12/19

 

GENRE: Alt Pop Rock

 

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In the year 4000 George Kilroy Marten, the universe’s last hope, faced off against his arch enemy The Huntress, Master of Dark Folk witchery who sought to devour the cosmos.

 

During their battle she sent him back in time, splitting his essence into 5 separate entities and thrusting them to the year 2016. Those 5 entities went on to become Green Knuckle Material.

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Interview with YDK: Lead Singer and Acoustic Guitar.

 

Discuss your composition and melody.

“Queen of Dragons” is composed as a mixture between a rock ballad and a modern pop song.

 

It utilizes a catchy melody in the hook that sticks with the listener after hearing the song for the first time.

 

The music itself starts off with a pretty acoustic guitar riff with open notes that give the song a medieval vibe.

 

It eventually builds into a high energy rock song in the chorus and maintains the energy throughout its entirety.

 

The best way to describe the music of this song, in the words of Michael Ravenda also known as Big Mike, is “a wall of guitars.”

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State the name of your producer and elaborate on the song.

The name of our producer is Michael Ravenda. Throughout the recording process, his ideas and insights were instrumental in pushing the music into the most unique direction possible.

 

In addition, he also played a major role in the writing process, both lyrically and in musical composition.

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Discuss the lyrics of the song.

The lyrics discuss the narrator’s frustration as he searches for love.

 

The term “Queen of Dragons” comes from the pop culture HBO TV show “Game of Thrones.” In the song, this term is used to describe the ideal girl, since, up until the last season, most people would agree that the ideal, perfect woman personified was Daenerys Targaryen also known as the Queen of Dragons.

 

Throughout the song, there are numerous other references to the show, all designed to tell this story of the quest for love.

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Elaborate on your music career.

All members of Green Knuckle Material have their eyes set on making it big in the music scene. In the short time, the band has been together, we’ve played some of the biggest venues in New Jersey and are looking forward to eventually touring full-time to make a living.

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Brief us on how you are reaching fans with your music.

The main way we reach fans is by playing gigs and Spotify. Social media is also important in creating relationships with fans and advertising our music as well as show dates.

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Discuss your motive behind making music.

We couldn’t stop if we tried. It’s part of us. We play and write music because we love it.

 

However, our goal is to spread love and acceptance to the world through our music.

 

We want to create meaningful music that can help fans feel close to us.

 

In addition, we want to share our views and experiences with the world as well.

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Discuss your songwriting.

The songs already exist. We just pull them out of the musical dimension and put them onto paper.

 

The lyrics and melody are already written before we even have the idea for the song, but it’s the work and creative process that allows those pieces to come to fruition in the form of Green Knuckle Material.

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Elaborate on your work and achievement so far in your music career.

We’ve played some of the best venues in New Jersey, including the Stone Pony and Starland Ballroom.

 

We’ve also made a huge impact in the New Brunswick music scene.

 

One of our most proud achievements is winning the 2019 Stone Pony “Rock to the top” competition.

 

In addition to this, we’ve also had the privilege of opening up for major acts such as Badfish, Ballyhoo, and All Time Low.

 

We have other large support slots to look forward to with a headlining show at the Stone Pony following our third DIY tour later this year.

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Tell us your opinion on using rhymes dictionary or writing software to develop lyrics. 

They are probably helpful, though we’ve never actually used any of these methods.

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Discuss the music industry.

It’s the toughest industry out there to make it in. Everyone is good and almost everyone works hard. It just comes down to who continues on through all the strife. Our favourite saying is that in terms of the industry, “there’s a lot of room at the top; it’s only the bottom that is crowded.”

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Elaborate on how you prepare yourself for a recording session.

We practice the songs over and over again until everyone is satisfied with their parts, and overall composition and sound.

 

Once the songs are written to everyone’s like, we are ready to schedule studio time where the parts are truly perfected.

 

After recording, we usually come up with a bunch of other ideas for the songs, so we end up implementing them into the live performance.

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Brief us on your preference in terms of tempo as in up-tempo, mid-tempo or slow tempo.

Our band is best known for being high energy, and we definitely prefer up-tempo over anything else. Speed and power are the major key elements of our music. (Pun intended)

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Discuss your shows or live performance.

Our live performance can be described in one word: energy. We like to hit the crowd with an explosive set that grabs their attention and never let us go. We want the crowd to feel our music and experience it with us as it unfolds in front of them.

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Share your press release and reviews with us.

We’ve had a lot of press release coverage, including Makin Waves magazine, a recent article in the Aquarian, and much more. Usually, the reviews are positive.

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Send a message across to your fans and supporters.

Many of our fans have been with us since the very beginning. Knuckleheads are the best fans out there and without them, we wouldn’t be GKM. What we’d like to say to all the Knuckleheads out there is that you’re all amazing and you make all the hard work worthwhile. We hope you all know how unique and beautiful you are and how much we love and appreciate every single one of you.

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Tell us what makes this song unique from others.

This song is unique because not only is a rock ballad combined with a pop song, but it includes two high energy hip-hop verses as well as a dueling guitar solo and a saxophone. It really doesn’t make sense how the song works, but it works, and it works well.

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Tell us the themes of most of your compositions. 

We like to create meaningful music. We’ve written songs about addiction, Alzheimer’s, broken hearts, love, acceptance, appreciation, hard work, and many other subjects. What’s truly amazing is we’re able to create this music by successfully merging rock, rap, pop, punk, jazz, blues, reggae, and numerous other genres.

 

Mobile Version

Gorran – Easy For You

Gorran – Easy For You

 

Gorran – Easy For You

Gorran – Easy For You

 

ARTIST NAME: Gorran

 

SONG TITLE:  Easy For You

 

RELEASE DATE: 07/06/2019

 

GENRE: Pop

 

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Gorran grew up in a very musical family, his father is a classical composer and Head of Composition and Contemporary Music at the Royal College of Music, and his mother is an editor at Gramophone magazine.

He has been writing and producing songs since the age of 13, but it was at The BRIT School that he found his sound and began to take writing seriously. Feeling inspired, he would write songs on his phone on train journeys to and from college.

 

Since leaving BRIT in summer 2017, Gorran has been writing, recording, and producing his original pop tracks, as well as refining his exceptional live show. He recently opened for KT Tunstall on her UK tour, including a performance at the London Roundhouse to a crowd of 2500.

 

Combining elements of dance, R&B, and hip-hop, Gorran produces contemporary pop with dark undertones.

 

His passion and flair for music were evident from a young age and during his time at the prestigious BRIT School (alumni including Adele, Amy Winehouse, and Rex Orange County), Gorran developed his distinctive sound and dynamic live show.

 

Since graduating Gorran has been writing and recording with industry professionals to produce original, bold, and gritty pop tracks. His debut single, ‘Easy For You’, was released on June 7th this year, with more original tracks to follow shortly.

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Discuss your composition and melody.

Very early on in the process, I made the conscious decision that the upbeat style of the instrumental would stand in contrast to the sad lyrical content.

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State the name of your producer and elaborate on the song.

A young producer called Drew James worked on the track with me. I had a clear vision for the production of the track, so I was heavily involved in this process, as I am with the production of all of my songs.

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Discuss the lyrics of the song.

The song is based on what was going on in my head after my long-term girlfriend cheated on me. We tried to save the relationship, but I constantly found myself questioning why it was so easy for her to get over what she’d done to me.

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Elaborate on your music career.

I grew up in a very musical family and have been writing music and performing my whole life.

 

I discovered my sound while I was at The Brit School, and since graduating I’ve been writing and recording my original music with industry professionals.

 

Recently I’ve been focusing on developing my live show, and I had the amazing opportunity to open for KT Tunstall on her UK tour earlier this year. Performing at the iconic London Roundhouse was such a great experience.

 

I’ve just released my first original track ‘Easy For You’, and have more coming in the next few weeks. It’s still early days, but the response has been really encouraging so far, and I’m excited to see how things progress over the coming months.

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Brief us on how you are reaching fans with your music.

At the moment I feel very connected to my fans, speaking to them directly on social media regularly. I think it’s important to have that personal connection with fans, as they are the ones who will ultimately have the power to take my music to the charts and they will be the ones filling up venues.

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Discuss your motive behind making music.

I want to be in a position where I can be touring the world with my music, to crowds that know and love my songs. I want to be known for my songwriting and to have a life-long career as an artist. A personal goal of mine is to at some point in my career write a truly timeless hit.

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Discuss your songwriting.

I wrote my first song at 14, but it was at college that I really realized my love for songwriting.

 

I met Drew James online in 2016, and he went on to produce ‘Easy For You’ with me, which was around the time I felt I really started to find my sound.

 

From then on, almost every song I’ve written has felt like it’s in the ballpark of the sound, and I’ve simply been building from there.

 

I love to write. It’s liberating, and such a personal feeling, which is what makes sharing your songs publicly such an interesting thing.

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Tell us your opinion on using rhymes dictionary or writing software to develop lyrics. 

I think it can do no harm to use these tools every once in a while, as long as you’re fully aware of the story you’re telling in a song and you don’t stray from that and start using words without putting thought behind them. There should still be meaning in the words, no matter where you pluck them from.

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Discuss the music industry.

The music industry is constantly changing, and keeping up with this is both exciting and challenging!

 

When I first started writing music as a teenager I never dreamed that I could self-release, but streaming has totally transformed the way we produce and consume music.

 

I love that I can get my tracks out directly to listeners without so many barriers in the way.

 

The challenge is making yourself heard in such a huge ocean of new music!

 

I am interested to see what happens next – how technology will continue to transform the music industry, and how the industry will respond.

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Elaborate on how you prepare yourself for a recording session.

The majority of the vocals on my records at the moment are recorded in my bedroom, so generally, it’s just wake up and get to work!

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Brief us on your preference in terms of tempo as in up-tempo, mid-tempo or slow tempo.

I couldn’t say I have a preferred tempo, whatever the specific song needs I give to it. I don’t exclusively prefer one tempo over another at all.

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Discuss your shows or live performance.

I recently opened for KT Tunstall on her UK tour, including a performance at the London Roundhouse to a crowd of 2,500, which was an incredible experience.

 

At the moment I play my songs, which are predominantly electronic in the recordings, acoustically. I love that the acoustic set-up provides more intimacy and that the songs are presented in their most raw form. I think this has a great impact on the audience.

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Send a message across to your fans and supporters.

Thank you to anyone who’s feeling my music so far. This first song only scratches the surface of my sound and I can’t wait to share more with you.

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Tell us what makes this song unique from others.

There is aggression in ‘Easy For You’ that I feel has been slightly lacking in pop music generally in recent years. There is also a great deal of vulnerability in the lyrics that I think will resonate with people.

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Tell us the themes of most of your compositions.

I wouldn’t like to box myself in to only writing about specific themes all the time – my music is constantly evolving, and what I’m saying in my songs is too.

 

However my first three releases all center around the deterioration of my relationship with the same girl.

 

The songs all came to me very naturally, and they are released chronologically, to tell the story of the breakdown of our relationship.

 

Mobile Version

Mungo's Hi Fi + Eva Lazarus + Max Romeo - Babylon Raid

Mungo’s Hi Fi – Babylon Raid

 

 Mungo's Hi Fi + Eva Lazarus + Max Romeo - Babylon Raid

Mungo’s Hi Fi + Eva Lazarus + Max Romeo – Babylon Raid

 

ARTIST NAME: Mungo’s Hi Fi + Eva Lazarus

 

SONG TITLE:  Babylon Raid

 

ALBUM TITLE: ‘More Fyah’

 

RELEASE DATE: 19th July (Album)

 

GENRE: Reggae

 

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Interview with Tom Tattersall

 

Tell us your opinion on creativity and originality.

It is very rare for artists to be completely original. For me, creativity is the process of identifying elements that you like within other music and other parts of life and blending them together in a way that represents yourself and what you want to express.

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Tell us the beginning of your passion for music.

I used to have piano lessons when I was young and one day I got bored with practicing the sheet music I’d been given. I started messing about and came up with a rock n roll riff of my own. I realized that I didn’t always have to play other peoples music but could make up my own stuff! Then I became fascinated with synths and bought my first synth when I was 13.

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Elaborate on how you make sure the quality of your sound is high.

I use a studio which I designed and built myself and put a lot of thought into the sound treatment to make sure every mix is as balanced as possible. We try out new tracks on our sound system and DJ gigs before we release to check the sound and most importantly the reaction of the crowd!

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Tell us how you get ideas to develop your songs.

I produce many styles of reggae and other bass music, from ska and rocksteady to dancehall and dubstep. I might hear another track that inspires an idea or a vocalist who I’d like to work with.

 

If I’m producing a track for a particular vocalist I research their other tracks and their style and try to make a track that I feel will fit. Often, once I’ve recorded a vocal I make some changes to the instrumental to work around the vocal.

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Discuss your music background.

I started playing music when I was 9 or 10 and had piano lessons. At school, I was in a couple of bands. In the first band, we played mostly covers of indie and rock tunes then when I was 16 I joined another band that played jazz and funk.

 

Also while in school I got hooked on using a basic music program on an Atari computer and started borrowing synths and other equipment to take home in the holidays. I started buying records and with one turntable I would record multitrack mixes with backing tracks and scratching routines.

 

I moved to Glasgow in 1994 and formed a band with some friends playing all kinds of styles from Latin to psychedelic rock.

 

I also set up my first electronic studio in my bedroom first with only a drum machine and a multi-track recorder and then bought keyboards and other stuff when I could afford it. I used to perform under the name ‘Algorhythm’ and played live sets of electro, house, techno, and dub.

 

I then met my friend Doug and we started Djing together as the ‘Dub Dentists.’ I began to focus on producing mainly Dub and Reggae and around the same time we started to build a sound system and called it Mungo’s HiFi.

 

We started a monthly reggae club night in a Working Men’s Club in Glasgow.

 

In 2005 we started our record label ‘Scotch Bonnet’ and released tracks that I was making.

 

We gradually expanded the studio and label and started working with more vocalists and other producers.

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Discuss your music process.

I often get musical ideas when I am out walking in the hills in Scotland. I don’t think too much about it and try and let ideas flow naturally. I record ideas on a voice recorder and take them to the studio and make a quick sketch of the idea. I listen to the sketch outside of the studio, for example in my kitchen or while driving and see what other ideas I can come up with to build up the track.

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State five hit songs and name the artists.

Nina Simone – My Baby just cares for me

 

The Jimi Hendrix Experience – Purple Haze

 

The Beatles – Sgt Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club

 

Damian Marley – Jamrock

 

Rihanna – Work

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Tell us how you entertain the audience during a live performance.

I play a wide selection of music that encompasses what we do. I try to show that I’m enjoying myself on stage and connect with the audience.

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List the name of artists that have a similar sound to yours.

OBF

 

Prince Fatty

 

Numa Crew

 

Coki

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Discuss how you think your music is impacting your fans.

Hopefully, it is blurring the borders between genres and showing the influence that Jamaican music has had on our culture.

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Tell us how you master your songs after production.

Sometimes I master tracks myself using high-end plugins; sometimes we use an external mastering company to do it.

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Discuss how you get your songs to digital stores.

We use a digital aggregator.

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Discuss how to generate income through music.

In our experience, playing gigs is the biggest source of income but it goes hand in hand with having a steady output of releases. Building a catalog of tracks gives income from streaming and publishing.

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Tell us your piece of advice to a new artist.

Find someone with experience to guide you! Believe in the music you make and don’t compromise too much to other peoples’ ideas of what you should be doing.

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State your favourite radio station.

BBC Radio 1Xtra.

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Go into details on this song.

Eva Lazarus recorded the vocal for us as a dubplate on a classic reggae instrumental. I felt it was a strong vocal and wanted to build a new instrumental for it. We then had a request from a multimedia theatre show called Kid_X to provide music for the soundtrack to their show. They were able to fund a video for one of the tracks and we decided to use More Fyah.

 

We decided to make the track and video about a futuristic dancehall scenario where people could send their avatars to a virtual sound system session.

 

Mobile Version

Blackkid – Hello Yellow

Blackkid – Hello Yellow

 

Blackkid – Hello Yellow

Blackkid – Hello Yellow

 

Artist Name: Blackkid

 

Song Title: Hello Yellow

 

Album Title: Afrika Reunite

 

Release Date: 13/05/2019

 

Genre: Afro Pop

 

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Elijah known as ‘The Black Kid’ was born in Limpopo and bred in Westonaria west of Gauteng.

 

The Black Kid is an Afro-Pop musician, he has a gospel single called ‘LOVER OF MY SOUL’ and he is currently working on his first Afro-pop album entitled “AFRICA REUNITE.”

 

The new project AFRICA REUNITE is reminding our African community about the liberty to being themselves, including their natural ability that thousands of people across the globe wish to have yet they cannot because it within an African man’s nature to do such things. Just to astonish you on the word “African” ‘Afr’ i- its raw while ‘can’- is ability.

In simple terms, the album is made out of raw talent and inspiration to help an African child to fulfill his/her dreams as well show off that raw talent they were born with…

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Tell us what your fans are saying about your music.

Lately, I have been discovering that my music is unique and it feels unique and to anyone who is their first time to hear my music, the first thing that comes to mind is the zeal to hear more because it’s catchy. It’s unique and fun.

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Tell us the factors you consider in choosing a song as your favourite.

Rhythm, dynamic, and melody.

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Tell us the names of producers you will collaborate with if you have the chance.

Black Coffee.

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Tell us the names of the songwriters you will collaborate with if you have the chance.

Kwestar and Casper Nyovest.

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Tell us your favourite TV show and state your reason.

My favourite TV show The Ellen show – it’s fun and exploring and V Entertainment – it’s where artists have fun.

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Tell us your best mood to create a song.

Feeling good, when I don’t feel sad because I have to relate to what I write about at that time so I have to be flexible.

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Tell us your interpretation of fame or success.

Fame to me is the level whereby a number of people have an expectancy of something from you or hope for. Success is when you have achieved a goal accomplished to end.

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Tell us the names of artists you will collaborate with if you have the chance.

Kwestar.

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Tell us about your experience performing on stage for the first time or recording in the studio for the first time.

Performing and recording for the first time, these two are the worst and the best. The first time I was recording in studio I was so excited but also scared that I won’t miss the tune or note or make mistakes at all, the same applies to performance I get scared and excited at the same time and I was shaking at first but then within a few minutes of engaging with the crowd I became really fine.

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Tell us how you approach songwriting.

It starts with the song title because I have to know what I am really talking about. Then write a story down then select how to structure and make a chorus and then find a melody for it.

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Tell us your opinion on blending genres or experimenting with sound.

I believe that as an artist you need to experiment and develop your unique sound. My music is a blend of Afro and pop while it is so unique.

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Tell us how you deal with rejection.

Well, rejection is always there in life and I tell myself that not everyone will like you or what you do and whenever I get rejected I just walk away though it hurts but rather stay away.

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Tell us how you record your vocals.

Well, I take it, step by step, meaning I take the verse first, the bridge if I have, the chorus and last verse.

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Tell us the software you used mostly for recording.

FL Studio.

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Discuss the selling of CDs and selling of digital files through digital stores.

Well quite honestly I haven’t sold CDs but I do sell digital based on my knowledge CDs both contribute the same but the difference will then be the fact that people use mobile phones to play music than home electronics or CDs and music can be transferred to one another and that’s the loss because the number of people that were sent the audio could’ve bought the CDs…

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Elaborate on the song.

‘Hello Yellow’ is a beautiful day song, before I could write it I needed something just to brighten up a day and I couldn’t think of anything but I remembered the advert used to play on TV back then in 2005/7 the ‘Hello Yellow’ on Sunlight Washing Powder and I remembered how it got us carried away and that’s how I got the title and I used a relationship that has been going through a lot lately and decided to celebrate their love in front of their enemies, because back then my mom would shout at us but when that advert played we would wait for that moment of Hello-yellow to say it all at once.

 

And I also used water under the bridge in a relationship of which is just small issues that can be solved or pass by and in the bridge; it’s a call for people to see how strong we have grown and how little fights cannot set us apart.

 

My last verse is just a direction of how I won’t go back to that worry or fights.

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Elaborate on your artist name and the title of the album.

Blackkid- I found this name one time when I was just thinking about who am I and I had no idea unto what am I until I read a small piece of a paper written about black empowerment and the other side had a poem written about Africans regarded as blacks with no colour and at the end it was written black children and I thought about it so deeply and I told myself I want to empower blacks and not only blacks but Africans and I came up with kid black and it didn’t make sense then I twisted to black kid and I just combined it to blackkid and yeah that was how I came up with the name.

 

Mobile Version

Loza Rose – Identity

Loza Rose – Identity

 

Loza Rose – Identity

Loza Rose – Identity

 

ARTIST NAME: Loza Rose

 

SONG TITLE: Identity

 

RELEASE DATE: 5/22/2019

 

GENRE: Electronic Pop

 

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Website

 

Tell us how you build the confidence to face the audience.

I always found myself very nervous performing in front of one person, but when it’s an audience; it is different. I think it’s different because when I perform, I’m connecting with everyone in the room. It’s like a big therapy group session.

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Tell us your weakness and strength in performance.

I have to say my strength is my voice. The way I sing and get down with my own music and vibe with the audience. My weakness is talking to the crowd because I always catch myself saying “um” over and over again.

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Discuss your songwriting.

When it comes to songwriting, I don’t always have a beat. It’s more like word vomit. When I’m feeling something, I get all these words in my head. Kind like Jenga, I have to find a way to fit all the pieces together, which is something my vocal coach taught me to do. I try to imagine what people want to feel and hone in on that thought.

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List your other skills apart from singing.

I don’t have much, but I’m not too bad at dancing. I took ballet when I was a little girl, did some recitals, but I ended up loving dancing. I’m also good at baking and connecting with people.

 

Originally, I wanted to be a psychologist before I wanted to be a singer. I decided that going for that career choice wouldn’t be the best fit for me, mainly because I don’t feel like taking in other people’s problems would be good for my mental state.

 

I think that singing works best because I can still help people as I connect with them with my music; it’s just like a therapy session.

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Tell us the most memorable moment in your music career.

I have to say going to the studio for the first time. The rush I got, recording songs back to back, you know, it felt right. I knew that is where I belong.

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Discuss your first performance.

I was about 15 years old. It was New Year’s Day, and the night before I went up to a cottage in Middletown, NY for a New Year’s Eve party. The next day I remember taking out my speaker and my mic and I started singing. People starting gathering around and I sang Whitney Huston’s “I Have Nothing”, and it felt like I was giving back to them. That’s when I knew it was the direction I wanted to head in.

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Elaborate on what you know about the music business.

If you find yourself in the right place, at the right time, it can be such a beautiful thing. There’s a very fine line between the good side, and the messed up, unfortunately abusive, and controlling part of the music industry. Even when it comes to artists’ managers, producers, labels, constantly not letting them have a voice.

 

And then there are the good parts when the management team is willing to let them speak, and expand on their creativity. I hope I continue to go in that direction because I love my management team. They really hear me out.

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List the instruments you can play.

I can play the Piano. I’m no Tchaikovsky, but I do enjoy playing. Eventually, I want to learn more about that instrument as I grow.

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Tell us how you tackle a pitch in your performance.

When I perform, and I know that a line is coming up that I have to hit a note that is hard to sing; I try to find the right moment before, take a quick breath in, and tackle that note. Breath is everything.

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Tell us how you build your melody.

As a lyricist, it’s a little difficult to write melodies. However, if I really feel a song I can hear it in my head before it comes out. Then I keep working on it until it sounds the way I want it to. When I started out, I couldn’t build melodies, but now it’s easy for me since I practiced improvisation and writing music in general.

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Describe your live performance and recording in the studio.

It’s pretty much the same when it comes to connecting with your fans. The pain, happiness, and soul in your lyrics are just some things I think about. The difference is that when I’m recording, I’m in a box, whereas on stage I’m free, and I see my audience connecting directly.

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Tell us if you prefer using live instruments for your recording.

Depending on the song and the sound I’m going for. If I want an electric guitar, then that’s what I need. Songs are like stories with ideas, and each idea should fit the song the way the writer hears it and wants it to be.

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Tell us the feedback you are getting pertaining to your music.

The most frequent feedback I get has to be the line “you sound like a pop singer, but you also sound unique in your voice.” They’ve said it’s almost a cross between Demi Lovato and Ariana Grande, with my own unique style.

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Discuss how you record your song.

I have fruit before I go to the studio and I drink a lot of water. When I’m in the booth, I pretend I’m about to perform. I try to have fun and communicate with the studio engineer, Stephen. He’s phenomenal, and he really understands what I’m going for when making music.

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Tell us if you write all your songs.

Most of them – Some of my songs are handed over by producer, Louis. He used to be in a band, he can sing, play piano and a bunch of other instruments. So when he sends me songs there’s a sense of “this will fit your sound.” He’s great at everything. Other than that, I write my lyrics and melodies, and my producer makes them into tunes.

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State your favourite song.

Out Of Sight – It’s about building confidence and letting all the negativity go.

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Discuss the themes of your songs.

I have a few fun songs, feeling good about yourself. “Summer Daze” for example is about having fun with your friends, and being out in the sun (Buns Out!) – And some others about mental health and the feelings leading up to a breaking point. Some of them I sing about being passionate about something.

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Elaborate on your artist name and the title of the album.

Loza Rose, however, my real name is Sophia Zuniga. I hate my last name so much that I want to change it to Loza one day. It comes from my grandmother, Elsa Loza, who was also a musician, a singer, and super artistic. My album that’s coming up is called “Roses & Thorns” which will be about the contrasts between the light and darkness of life.

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Share your press release and review with us.

Loza Rose – Identity

 

About Loza Rose

Born in 2000, in Teaneck, NJ, Loza Rose started singing and playing piano at the early age of seven. She took piano lessons for two years before performing in theatre both as a singer and a young actress. This continued until her freshmen year of high school, where she changed her interest to choir full time.

 

In 2014, she took to YouTube where she sang covers and spoke about mental illness.

 

During her Junior Year, one of her videos reached 200k views within a month. This inspired her to begin composing her own music, and she did start in 2015 writing over 30 songs that year.

 

Right out of high school, Loza decided to push her musical talents to the next level. Taking independent vocal lessons and hiring a manager to push her career forward, she was signed to EAR after six months of developing her sound.

 

Loza gives credit for her lyric style and musical composition to her idols. Her grandmother, Elsa De Los Angeles Loza (known as a singer and an accomplished performer in Quito, Ecuador) inspired Sophia to appreciate music in all forms. It wasn’t until that close family member fell ill; Sophia’s drive to achieve a career in the music industry began.

 

After pursuing a life of performing at small events, Sophia created Loza Rose as her stage name to remember and honour her grandmother, Elsa.

 

Some of her other idols for songwriting and performance can be attributed to Demi Lovato, Christina Aguilera, Ke$ha, Whitney Houston, and Selena.

 

Loza Rose describes her music as “unique and inspirational” while her sound can be found in Indie Pop.

 

Her range in music, however, does not stop at just that but also can be heard in Electronic and Latin Pop.

 

She hopes to one day hear her music on local radio stations, Spanish clubs and perform at benefit concerts.

 

On November 17th, 2016, Loza Rose sought treatment at a mental hospital for self-harm. After 11 years of hurting her own body, she finally decided that it “wasn’t normal”, and was convinced by her school therapist. She was diagnosed with Obsessive Compulsive Personality Disorder, and she has been on medication since the day she was admitted to cope with her ongoing condition.

 

As a musician, she finds that songwriting is her way of escaping her difficult past. Loza sometimes hopes that her music will help those who don’t have the sense of family or have a strong tether to the world and give people the inspiration to liberate themselves.

 

Loza adds; “I want to give back to the world that same feeling that musicians give me when I listen to their music. That sense of empowerment and emotional conflict you hear is just beautiful.”

 

About The Single

The young up-and-coming Loza Rose is back with her new electronic pop single ‘Identity.’

 

The catchy track has every element to resonate with the listeners.

 

In a saturated music scene, Loza Rosa is able to differentiate herself through powerful lyrics.

 

‘Identity’ speaks about going through mental illness and the difficulties of being labeled.

 

Through the artist’s own point of view, she is able to give a story through the lyrics that leave an impact on the listener.

 

The memorable voice of Loza Rose is backed up by an electronic pop production that gives the lyrics contrast. Moreover, it goes hand in hand with the chorus making it a catchy single.

 

Loza Rose is an artist to keep an eye and ear for, as she will continue to deliver singles that will leave an impact on the music scene.

 

Mobile Version

Simon Lunche – Cherry Wine

Simon Lunche – Cherry Wine

 

Simon Lunche – Cherry Wine

Simon Lunche – Cherry Wine

 

Simon Lunche – Cherry Wine

 

ARTIST NAME: Simon Lunche

 

SONG TITLE: Cherry Wine

 

RELEASE DATE: 1/22/19

 

GENRE: Singer-Songwriter

 

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Influenced by a solo performance of Eric Clapton’s at age five, Berkeley, California, singer-songwriter Simon Lunche developed a precocious knack for guitar. Since then, he has moved on to become the youngest ever to be endorsed by Gibson, earning his name for his stylings on a Vintage ’56 Stratocaster.

 

Lunche’s newest singles are a testament to his knack for crafting rich arrangements that are not afraid to indulge in soul leanings.

Simon Lunche has packed a near lifetime of musical experience into just 20 years. As the creative force behind Bay Area-based indie act, The Blondies, he’s written and produced the band’s entire catalog and made his name as a captivating live performer.

 

Having spent the last decade as a frontman, Lunche now delivers a solo debut that brings a powerful new depth and even more dynamic vision to his artistry.

Formed when Lunche was 9 years old, The Blondies released their acclaimed album ‘Just Another Evening’ in June 2016 and toured the Western US, right around the time of his high school graduation.

 

While several of the older band members decided to focus on finishing college, Lunche opted to forego school and pursue music full time.

 

Despite having written The Blondies four LPs on his own, Lunche quickly found that working as a solo artist added a greater degree of creative freedom and sparked an unexpected evolution in his sound.

As he settled into finding his voice as a lead guitarist, Lunche conjured up a guitar lick and composition that would make its way to multi-Grammy award-winning engineer Dave Reitzas (who’s previously worked with artists ranging from Barbra Streisand to The Weeknd).

 

While working with Dave on his mixing, he met Sean Hurley (John Mayerbassist) who is currently in production with Simon on his upcoming album. At its center is Lunche’s own luscious vocals, producing lustrous guitar licks along the way that help carry the tunes forward. Rounding it up is bass from Sean Hurley, and backing vocals from Tiffany Palmer (John Mayer) and Brandon Winbush (Tori Kelly), sealing the deal on a brand of music that Lunche acknowledges as “soul pop.”

 

​Simon is known for his dynamic live performances. Audiences claim that his guitar and voice take them to another place. He has been compared to John Mayer, Jeff Buckley, James Bay, and Ed Sheeran, and his live performances are not to be missed!

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Tell us how to refine a demo to a mastered song.

I think it’s a different process for every song. And a lot depends on how well you produced the original demo. Sometimes less has to be re-recorded than other times.

 

Most of my demos have me on drums and bass, which always need to be replaced. So my first step is always calling up my favourite session players and getting them to replay the rhythm parts I’ve written.

 

On rare occasion, I may play live guitar with them in the studio if I think it will help the overall feel.

 

Across the board, I think the most important thing is not losing whatever magic the demo may have had.

 

Often times, demos are made the same day the song is written and I think that can really show in both the instrumental performance and vocal performance. If nothing else, I think it’s important to use the demo as a way of guiding myself back into whatever frame of mind I was in when I was first writing the song.

 

Even if I am replacing the lead vocal or redoing a guitar, the demo versions serve as a way or re-entering the word of the song.

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Discuss the processing involved in creating a song.

My process is sort of that I have no process. Sometimes I will hear an idea in my head and within five minutes the whole song is done and played out on a guitar.

 

Other times I battle with an idea for weeks or months before it ever clicks into something that feels finished.

 

I do not have set rules regarding whether or not I write lyrics or melody first.

 

Things happen in different ways at different times, and thus my main concern is more just to keep the pipes open so that when a song is ready to present itself, it is able to.

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Elaborate on the themes of most of your songs.

My songs of late have shared themes of love, and reminiscence of the past. These topics could always change over time depending on how I’m feeling a few years down the line, or what I’ve experienced.

 

I’m always writing something that’s real to me in one way or another. If I can’t be authentic about emotions or feelings that I’ve actually experienced then the song never comes out very good.

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Tell us your greatest musical works up to date.

Whichever one I am currently working on – I’m always making progress, and I’m always looking for ways to be a better me.

 

If I had to pick something from the past that I was particularly proud of it would be the record “Just Another Evening” that I exclusively wrote, arranged, and produced under the now dead band name, “The Blondies.”

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Tell us those behind your music process.

I am working with Aaron Sterling (Drums), Sean Hurley (Bass), and Tiffany Palmer (Backing Vocals) on my album.

 

Sean is such an amazing Bass player. He’s always making the right choice for the song and has such an intuitive feel for what I’m looking for. Aaron is the same. I can’t say enough about these musicians and their credentials speak for themselves.

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Tell us how you are handling the promotion of your music.

I have a very active social media following that I promote to as well as play shows throughout California. I am working on planning a tour to promote my music after the full album is released.

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Tell us your future goals and how you aim to accomplish.

My biggest goal will always be to be able to sustain myself enough through music that I can spend my whole life making records. I wasn’t built for a desk job, and I intend to keep working as hard as I can to be the best musician I can be.

 

I hope to keep meeting great musicians, and mentors that will help me grow, and to stay on the path I’m currently walking.

 

These songs are the most important thing in my life, and I’m going to blast them out to the whole world.

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Tell us what you think has changed in the music industry.

I think the coming of the internet has probably been the biggest change in the industry. All of a sudden anybody can release their music to the world at a very low cost. It’s a pretty great thing. I think it’s also made the market for music massively oversaturated. But all in all, you’ve got to appreciate what the internet can do for artists.

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Tell the greatest mistake to avoid while making a song.

Thinking you got it right on the first go. Maybe I feel that way because I produce my own music, but for me, it’s really important to be able to step back and as objectively as possible examine the song.

 

You’ve got to be able to ask yourself, “Does everything here have a purpose”? And I think you have to be okay cutting out a part or an instrument that may be super cool to you, but doesn’t really serve the song in the best way.

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Tell us how you boost your performance.

Live shows are always a real joy, and no two are the same. Every night I go on a different musical journey with my guitar in the solo sections of songs.

 

Sometimes you see a version of ‘Cherry Wine’ that has a 30-second mellow solo at the end, and sometimes you see a screaming 5-minute solo. It’s all based on the feeling going on within me that night. I always want to be true to that. I try to leave everything I’ve got out on the stage. At the end of the night, If I’m completely drained and ready for a 24-hour nap I know I did well up there.

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Explain the structure of the song.

There is no “right” song structure. You need to do whatever it is that suits the song you’re working on best. If that means putting a pre-chorus before a verse, you do it. If it means adding a few bars where you may not usually, you do it. I think this stuff is all about listening, and determining what’s best for the song.

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Discuss how the instruments come together for a song.

The chordal foundation of ‘Cherry Wine’ was always based around my old ’56 Stratocaster. Something about the way the neck of that guitar fits in my hands prompted me to discover the riffs that would form the song.

 

Naturally, day one of recording started with two 100 watt amps and that guitar.

 

I worked up the smoothest neck pickup tone I could, micing the amps with five different microphones that resulted in the guitar sound you hear at the start of the recording. Every other element of the track was built off of that.

 

I ended up tracking two different drummers, one in L.A. and one in Berkeley and adding in many of my own percussion elements to finally achieve the rhythmic feel I was going for.

 

The bass was played during the recording of drum kit number 2 by my friend Sean Hurley. You can’t go wrong with a player like him, and he was immediately in tune with the feel I was going for on the song. He played the part twice, and the second take was the winner.

 

The bass tone on ‘Cherry Wine’ came from Sean’s 62’ Fender P-Bass that I ran through a Versatone amp mic’d with a FET 47. This is my bass chain for almost every song on the record. It came out of trial and error by my engineer, Scott Bergstrom and I and ultimately we haven’t found anything better.

 

A LOT of time was spent working on sounds for this song. For better or for worse, I aim really high with my production. I never compare my productions to other 20-year-olds or other people in my weight class. I aim at the biggest producers in music, the Paul Epworth’s, and George Martins and I try to make something that sounds bigger. I don’t succeed, but it is this mentality that allows me to make the best thing I am capable of at the time. It is this mentality that keeps me chasing greatness.

 

After many months of recording trial and error, the track was solidified and ready for the mix.

 

‘Cherry Wine’ was the 3rd song I mixed with Dave Reitzas in Los Angeles. Dave has been amazing with all these songs, recognizing always that the emotion in them should take center stage. He’s really been able to milk my recordings for every drop of feeling in them. We spent a day doing the mix at East West Studio 3 which holds incredible history as it was the room where the Beach Boys recorded their masterpiece, Pet Sounds. I was geeking out all day. By 1:30 AM we had printed the mix through a Fairchild 670 on the mixbus and we walked out of there with the track you hear today.

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State your musical skills.

When I was 5 years old I started playing guitar in classical lessons.

 

My teacher would always get upset with me for reading the sheet music once, memorizing the part and playing it back without looking at the paper.

 

I wasn’t cut out for the rigid structure of classical training, and besides, it was really the electric guitar that I wanted to be playing.

 

I ended up cycling through quite a few teachers until about the age of 12 when I found one that I stuck with. I’ve found that aside from having a teacher, there’s equally as much to be learned from the exploration of other people’s music.

 

At times my biggest growth spurts came from playing along to other records that I loved or playing with musicians better than me.

 

I’ve learned worlds from people who aren’t even guitar players. Sometimes a piano player or a bass player is so musical with their phrasing of notes that I get better just listening to them. I can’t tell you how many times I’ve walked out of a jam session with other musicians feeling like my perception of playing had completely changed.

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Tell if you consider acting in a movie.

I did some acting as a child, but at this point my focus is music.

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Tell us how you eliminate noise in your recordings.

I make sure I am recording in an environment with clean power, and no unwanted mic bleed from streets, talking, etc. If the initial signal I’m taking from the mic is clean, I won’t ever have noise problems at later times in the recording process. So I make sure my signal is good. I do not often have any noise issues.

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List the name of artists you cherish most.

When I was younger my biggest influence was The Beatles – The foundation of any songwriting skill that I have come from listening to their records on repeat.

 

As I’ve grown and discovered more music I have also drawn stylistic influence/inspiration from Jeff Buckley, and John Mayer as well as Van Morrison and Bob Dylan.

 

I’ve often been influenced by producers as well – Predominantly Paul Epworth, George Martin, and Greg Wells. All of these people share one thing in common, whether it is by means of a guitar, a voice, a great song, or a huge soundscape, their records all feel like something so real. That’s what I’m drawn to, and that’s what inspires me – Real feeling in a record.

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Tell us how you get inspiration.

I write about my own feelings and experiences. Just being alive is enough for infinite albums worth of material.

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Elaborate on the song.

While the verses of the song quite literally dictate the happenings of a dream, the chorus is much more symbolic. I generally avoid divulging exact meanings of my songs as I think it detracts from the listeners’ ability to find their own truth in it, but I will say this… The repeated phrase, “Cherry Wine” is often mistaken as literal wine. In actuality, it is a symbol for the extraordinary, but fleeting emotional fulfillment that the narrator feels from the female presence in his dream.

 

The tragedy of this feeling in the song is the longing for the past, the relationship, and the resulting difficulty the narrator has moved forward. That feeling or memory can be seen but when the narrator reaches for it, he can never touch it; it disappears.

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Elaborate on your artist name and the title of the album.

Simon Lunche is my actual birth name. ‘Cherry Wine,’ the title of my single, refers to the memory of a feeling that is elusive and unattainable.

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Share your press release and review with us.

Press Release:

 

BERKELEY, CA (January 22, 2019) – The new soul-pop single from Simon Lunche, “Cherry Wine,” smolders with the intoxicating aroma of a crackling fire melting away the winter’s bite.

 

Its indulgent mix of silky smooth guitar licks and caramelized vocals is a hypnotizing dance between two enamoured lovers.

 

The romantic sway leans in slowly with an all-night longing gaze.

 

“Cherry Wine” was mixed by multi-Grammy award winner Dave Reitzas, features bass by Sean Hurley (John Mayer), and back-up vocalists Tiffany Palmer (John Mayer) and Brandon Winbush (Patti Labelle, Tori Kelly).

 

Lunche is a young man with an old soul that comes through in every inflection of his alluring croon. That aching passion bleeds into each note of “Cherry Wine.”

 

It glides like the caress of fingers on the skin as his Stratocaster combs its melody into a burning ember. Each refrain soothes with an overflowing cup containing jazz-driven chord progressions, a harmony-dripping chorus, and vocal flourishes that invigorate the entire circuit, again and again.

 

Lunche has packed a near lifetime of musical experience into just 20 years. Along with taking up the guitar at age five, and soon becoming the youngest endorsed artist in the history of Gibson Guitars, he’s built a vast musical knowledge which includes composing all of the instrumental parts for all of his songs.

 

His creamy, shimmering sound comes from a beautiful, Vintage ’56 Stratocaster that he spent his entire college savings on without hesitation.

 

Lunche writes from the heart and plays with his soul. When on stage, he attributes his inspiration to the common language of music that supersedes any language barriers.

 

Mobile Version

Looseleaf – Confetti

Looseleaf – Confetti

 

Looseleaf – Confetti

Looseleaf – Confetti

 

ARTIST NAME: Looseleaf

 

SONG TITLE:  Confetti

 

ALBUM TITLE: Confetti

 

RELEASE DATE: June 1, 2019

 

GENRE:  Electro Pop/Indie Pop

 

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Pride month is here and Looseleaf is celebrating by releasing their new single, CONFETTI. This catchy tune fuses electro and indie pop styles, underlined with inventive hooks that will make your heart smile.

 

CONFETTI emphasizes the importance of loving who you are while honouring past and present trailblazers who have paved the way for a more colourful tomorrow. Whether you’re gay, straight, bi, trans, fluid, or undecided…this song celebrates you because at the end of the day love is love and Looseleaf is proud of their community…

 

LOOSELEAF is Anthony Marone and Wesley Edwards. They started in 2013, writing vibes in their tiny 200 square foot apartment in Hermosa Beach, and landed in New York City for their latest creations.

 

Looseleaf mixes indie and electro-pop, infused with quirky beats and warm vocals. Their latest single Confetti celebrates pride, love, and community. Confetti is available on iTunes, Spotify, and all major platforms.

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Share your life story with us.

Our story begins in 2010, where our mutual love for music was founded in the heat of Texas during the summer within the catalogs of The Beatles discography. Still a major inspiration for our music today, we would listen to The Beatles on repeat, slowly growing a fondness for one another and solidifying our combined roots in the world of music.

 

As time passed, and our relationship flourished, we began to intertwine our personal music libraries, finding common ground in electro/indie pop.

 

Then, on the beaches of Hermosa Beach in southern California, Looseleaf was born to the tune of a ukulele. Our sound has developed and grown over the years, guiding us from coast to coast, and settling in New York City today.

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List the names of those that have supported you so far in your music career and use this opportunity to thank them.

We’ve been navigating the music industry on our own for a couple of years now.

 

Being unsigned, we’ve had the opportunity to try new things and grow an authentic brand without the permission of anyone.

 

It has been an unbelievable experience letting our closest friends and family hear the sounds our souls make.

 

We are fortunate to have an extraordinary support system surrounding us, and those who have been on this journey with us from the beginning know who they are. We are eternally grateful for their love and support, as it keeps us climbing even during the hardest of times.

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Narrate your experience while recording in the studio or while touring.

Touring is a whirlwind of an experience. While we haven’t taken our personal music on tour, we’ve been fortunate enough to have taken our careers in musical theatre on the road. Seeing the country, learning new cultures, performing, and meeting new people is something that we both absolutely love to do, and we both plan to take our music on new adventures in the future.

 

The recording is one of our favourite things to do. We have our own personal studio in our apartment in New York. The spectrum of emotions we’ve felt in the studio is enormous, as it can be time-consuming, creatively exhausting, painfully tedious, repetitive, and overwhelmingly frustrating while also being the most liberating experience we could have together. The sheer endlessness of our creative boundaries is challenging and invigorating to navigate, but once you find the right chord with the right beat with the right hook, the bliss can be all-consuming, making the process that much more worth it.

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Discuss your songwriting.

Songwriting is not a cut and dry process for us. Sometimes Wesley can write beautiful lyrics that spawn a great melody.

 

Other times, Anthony can produce an interesting beat that influences a catchy hook.

 

We have to listen to each other, and let the music find its way by bouncing ideas off one another.

 

The most important thing is to take constructive criticism and grow with the process.

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Elaborate on your future projects.

2019 has proven to be a very busy year for us with releasing our full EP and a single before the summer. We’re hoping to release at least one or two more singles before we begin developing our next album.

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Tell us what you are doing to increase your fan base.

By being unabashedly ourselves! We can only hope that the fans of our music are not only on this journey with us because they enjoy our product, but because they know and like who we are as artists and people, both inside and outside the studio.

 

We want people to know that by tuning in to our music, you are getting a look into our relationship, our quirks, our flaws- our humanity.

 

While we put all of ourselves into our sound, our music is a culmination of everyone we love, everyone we interact with, and all the beautiful people who influence us.

 

By creating a community, a world surrounding our music, we’ve had an awesome opportunity for us to get to know not only who is listening, but why they are listening too!

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Tell us that point in time you wanted to give up on your music career.

The market is saturated. Art is everywhere. The truth is that some other artists have more songs, more fans, more streams, and thusly more people who believe in them. Doubt fills our hearts often, but there is absolutely nothing in this world we would rather be doing.

 

We’d take every ounce of pain that comes with creation than sit on the sideline and watch someone else paint our world for us. To quote Anthony’s brother in law, “The joy has to be in the journey because you don’t stop living once you’ve made it.”

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Go into detail on how you make your instrumentation or melody.

Because we live in New York, the sounds of the city permeate through our walls every day. Even when it’s silent, it’s not. Because music is natural and embedded within all people, we try and listen to the sounds our emotions make, starting with one note and building from there. There is no process – it just has to come naturally.

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Tell us your complete understanding of music licensing.

With a degree in Arts Administration from Wagner College, Anthony has a full understanding of music licensing and copyright, having taken intensive courses on business law, management, and economics with a combined concentration in music, art, and theatre.

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State your favourite genre of music.

We certainly don’t discriminate on any music genre, but our absolute favourite is indie-pop. We are also huge fans of jazz, as well as classic pop music from the 50s, 60s, and 70s.

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Tell us the theme of most of your songs.

Mental health, anxiety, depression, addiction, LGBTQ+ pride, love, fear, death, acceptance so just a bunch of super light and frothy stuff.

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Elaborate on this song.

“Confetti” is an LGBTQ+ pride anthem you’ll want to shout from the rooftops! The song maintains its poise while not so gently caressing the idea of a world where being queer is not just fully accepted, but embraced and celebrated!

 

We are a proud, recently engaged gay couple who make music together and we hope that we, as well as this song, will inspire others in our community to be proud of who they are and be unafraid to light this world up with their true, beautiful colours!

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Discuss digital distribution and streaming.

Fortunately for artists, it has become increasingly easier to release music digitally to mass markets. While it at times feels like screaming into a void, the accessibility to new, influential music is inspiring and we are grateful to live in a world where artists are able to create their own opportunities.

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Tell us numerous ways that artists can boost their revenue.

Do everything possible while maintaining true to yourself and your brand.

 

Sell merch, play concerts, and get your name out there so that people know who you are.

 

There are so many tools out there to help distribute your music to the right people, and there is a world of money to be made with your music.

 

Remember to start slow, as being in this industry is not a sprint to the finish line.

 

Most importantly, remember that while generating revenue is a wonderful goal to obtain, you have to make your music because you love it. Don’t forget why you began creating music in the first place. You can’t take your money with you after your gone, but your legacy and how you impacted the world will last forever.

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Tell us your opinion on self-training and enrolling in an educational institution to study music.

We have always been self-starters and firmly believe in creating our own path to success. If there was something we didn’t understand, we found the answers ourselves. While getting an education from an institution can help lay the foundation to a successful career, it takes you to hone the lessons you learn and find your own way throughout the business.

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Go on at length on what it takes to write a hit song.

A hit song has to take the idea of familiarity and put its own spin on it.

 

You should feel like you’ve heard the song before, even if you haven’t.

 

It should sound like a moment in time you remember, or a feeling you’ve felt on a specific day.

 

It should resonate with you no matter where you are, who you are with when you need that one thing to help you transcend time and space to lose yourself.

 

It should take you to the past, present, and future all at once. It should make you dream for better days or embrace the moment you’re in right now.

 

It should be a reflection of you at your best and worst.

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State your artist’s name and elaborate on it.

We are Looseleaf. We are the pen gliding on paper. We are the brush massaging the canvas. We are the leaf blown off its branch and dancing through the wind. We are the hum of traffic in the city. We are the steam billowing off your coffee while you watch the sunrise. Looseleaf is you… elevated.

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State the title of the song and the meaning.

Our song is named “Confetti” to represent the liberation of the LGBTQ+ community and the evolving freedoms from being unapologetically ourselves – As one would throw a handful of confetti in the air to accurately depict a celebration, one can now listen to our song “Confetti” to encapsulate the same feelings.

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State the title of the album and the reason for choosing the title.

Our song “Confetti” is a single and should make you feel like you’re at a pride parade!

 

Mobile Version

Lara Smile - The Fighting's Over

Lara Smile – The Fighting’s Over

 

Lara Smile - The Fighting's Over

Lara Smile – The Fighting’s Over

 

Artist Name – Lara Smile

 

Song Title – The Fighting’s Over

 

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Apple Music

 

iTunes

 

Spotify

 

Fusing an avant-garde mix of electro/rock, Lara’s music is guitar-driven, synth-inspired and brimming with colourful layers of alt-pop.

 

Influenced by many genres of music, Lara started out writing punk and soul tunes on her guitar and all-night raves in her teens led to a love of dance music and experimenting with samples.

 

In recent years, having caught the ear of BBC and international DJs, Lara’s music has so far received extensive airplay on radio stations in the UK and across the world.

 

Lara has recently featured on the new Shed Seven album, Instant Pleasures, she’s collaborated with The Orb and she’s worked with legendary producers, ‘Youth’ and Tim Bran (London Grammar, Paul McCartney and Richard Ashcroft).

 

She’s performed at some the world’s largest venues and music festivals including The Isle Of Wight Festival and The Great Escape.  She already has four Glastonbury performances under her belt. She has supported and shared the stage with many legendary artists including Pete Doherty, James McCartney, and Jesse Wood.

 

Her debut album is now available on iTunes and Amazon, via Wonky Pop Records.

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Describe yourself as an artist.

I’m a soul, rock, indie singer and songwriter who is not afraid of trying out new musical ventures.

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Tell us the genre of your music.

Alternative Rock.

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Tell us the story behind your song.

The Fighting’s Over depicts a roller-coaster romance, with an underlying psychological tension.

 

The fictional story depicts a couple that has to come to terms with letting go of their anger. To get annoyed or angry with someone I think it means you’re allowing them to have some control over you.

 

The chorus is just saying, “Now the fighting’s over”, as in, ‘I’m letting go of any turbulence and moving on from the bulls**t’!

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List the names of blogs, radio or television stations that have supported you so far.

NME, Guardian, Its All Indie, Spindle, Joyzine, RGM, Louder Than War, BBC Introducing, Amazing Radio; it has been great getting so much support over the last few tracks and the album.

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Elaborate on your music career, experience, and future goals.

As well as a singer/songwriter I am a session singer for various bands and have worked and recorded with Shed Sever, The Orb, Youth, Jah Wobble, Alex Patterson and Steve Hillage.

 

I have toured most of the world with The Australian Pink Floyd Show for the last 8 years and we’re going back on tour to the U.S. in August – October this year!

 

I’m currently on tour with my own band in the UK and want to keep touring as much as I can. I love playing live shows and it’s the best way to visit new places.

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Brief us what inspires you to write, compose and sing.

Lots of situations and artists inspire me, I like to makeup stories and write poems and use them for lyrics. A lot of my songs are philosophical, sometimes I just write words down that come into my head and go from there.

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Tell the piece of advice you will give to an upcoming artist.

Keep on keepin’ on! Don’t give up.

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Tell us how you write your lyrics, compose, sing and record in the studio.

I usually start with a poem that I’ve got tucked away somewhere, then find a melody and match the two together.

 

Record the parts to Logic; drum beat, guitar, bass, samples, and synths.

 

Come up with ideas for song structures, and then work with the band to finish it.

 

If it’s a hit, we take it to the studio for the proper recording treatment. That’s where we put the drums and bass down – I finish the rest on my laptop at home.

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Name your favourite artists for collaboration. 

The Orb, Jah Wobble, Youth and those mentioned above of course. I’d also love to work with Karen ‘O’, James Murphy (LCD Sound system), Chemical Brothers, Alexis Taylor (Hot Chip), Josh Homme, Matt Bellamy, M.I.A, Alison Goldfrapp.

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Tell us how you will spend a million dollars.

I would probably give some to charity and spend the rest on promoting, writing, rehearsing and touring my music, that’s my first priority. I would also love to go and record at an amazing studio like Gee Jam and visit Jamaica.

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Discuss music promotion and how you are boosting your fan base.

Post regularly on all your social platforms, for me, I mainly use Instagram and Facebook. It’s a fun way to connect with your fans and find out what they are up to as well.

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Tell us how you manage other activities with your music career.

Music is my life and I get to travel. As a session singer, I get to see a lot of the world. It’s important to get a balance though; I always love to catch up with friends and family when I get home. As well as check-out other artists and get back into the London music scene when I am back.

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State your artist’s name and elaborate on it.

Lara Smiles is my real name. I decided to use my own name as even though I gig, record and develop songs with a band, Lara Smiles is my project.  I write all the songs and record the music!

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State the title of the album and the reason for choosing the title.

Well, the first single from the album was, All For You. The reason I liked it, is because the album is like a gift, something to give back to all the people who have supported me, All For You – Lara Smiles.

 

 Mobile Version

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IF YOUR SONG IS SELECTED:

We will offer a blog placement under Broadtube Music Network If your song is selected. Your song will be added to five playlists – Spotify Playlists, Deezer Playlists and SoundCloud Playlists (Broadtube Playlists and WorkSender Playlists). We can add YouTube Video to one of our Online TV Channels (Subjected to Approval).

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We will offer a blog placement under MusicFree Screen if your song is not selected. We will add your song to five playlists – Spotify Playlists, Deezer Playlists and SoundCloud Playlists (MusicFree Screen Playlists and ExtraMix Playlists).