The Buffalo Skinners

The Buffalo Skinners

 

The Buffalo Skinners

The Buffalo Skinners

 

Artist Name:  The Buffalo Skinners

 

Song Title:  Washing My Hands

 

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Sheffield band reveal topical video for new track ‘Washing My Hands

 

Sheffield’s The Buffalo Skinners are back with an educational video demonstrating their take on the official World Health Organisation hand washing steps. ‘Washing My Hands’ – the first taste of the bands’ upcoming new album – will be released digitally on 24th April, via Loose Chat Records.

 

Following on in the same style as 2019s double A-Side ‘Do What You Want/You Say Love, But You Mean Hate’ ‘Washing My Hands’ was recorded live to two-inch tape with Lee Smith and Jamie Lockhart at Leeds’ Greenmount studios. (The Cribs, Easy Life, The Vaccines.)  The song has been described by a close friend of the band (who wishes to remain anonymous) as “Catchy as COVID-19.”

 

Too soon? Too soon.

 

Greenmount studio is the proud owner of the very tape machine that recorded  The Beatles studio sessions in Hamburg in the early 60s, being one of Pete and James’ go-to bands, they recorded ‘Washing Your Hands’ with a nod to Rubber Soul wide panning the bass and drums and tracking the vocals.

 

Despite sounding like it was written with the Coronavirus in mind, songwriter Peter Seccombe says ‘Washing My Hands’ is about becoming content with the unwanted change in your life.

 

“When you’re stuck, and you can’t see no way out. The light bulb flashes above your head. You can just wave goodbye, shut the door, or wash your hands.”

 

In the video to ‘Washing My Hands’ the playful nursery rhyme sing-song style syncs with Peter Seccombe (Guitar and Vocals) delivering an enthusiastic Jamie Oliver style cookery-programme presentation, that has him demonstrating a thorough hand scrubbing, juggling bars of soap and drinking red wine. (Perhaps more Keith Floyd) …

 

The video was made one afternoon just days before the national UK lockdown was announced by Boris Johnson.  James Nicholls (fiddle, piano, and vocals) who shot and edited the video added: “We wanted to get some additional footage of Pete heading off to a farmers market, talking to vendors about their soap, but I think now that would be deemed inessential travel.”

 

Melting together the 60’s stylings of The Beatles and The Band with more modern groups like Felice Brothers, the group now have three full-length studio albums under their belts over their decade long career, the most recent of these being 2016’s ‘Cease Your Dreaming’ produced by Mercury Prize-nominated Colin Eliot (Richard Hawley, Kylie, Slow Club).

 

The Buffalo Skinners paint from a broad palette of influence but maintain their core sound through James Nicholls’ unmistakable violin playing and Peter Seccombe’s sharp British lyricism. The band are working on a fourth full-length album, which they have recently posted a Kickstarter to help fund after losing out on bookings due to the Corona Virus.

 

The Buffalo Skinners are: Peter Seccombe (guitar & vocals), James Nicholls (violin, piano & vocals) David Haynes (bass), Phil Nixon (guitar & vocals) and Miles Stapleton (drums)

 

Previous Praise:

“Packed with neat lyrical turns and melodies that recall Whitney’s debut album” – Clash Magazine

 

“Their music is painted vividly across a broad canvas, using a palette that draws easily from traditional folk and rock ‘n’ roll”

 – God Is In the TV

 

“The Buffalo Skinners aren’t a band with any desire to be pinned down to a single sound, wherever the music takes them, The Buffalo Skinners are well worth following.”

– For The Rabbits

 

“There’s a maturity and complexity to the writing”

–  R2 Magazine

 

“On the track, they push raggedy country into modern times, wrapping bluegrass sensibilities around pop’s little finger.”  -Too Many Blogs

 

PREORDER:

Kickstarter

 

 

Go into details on the changes in your life for choosing music as a career.

I was studying painting at art college and kind of dabbling with music on the side, but what I really wanted to do was learn how to make my recordings sound better, so I took a path that led me to studying just that in Scarborough. Turns out that was a good decision!

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Tell us how you will manage fame as an established artist.

Ha-ha, I don’t think that has any danger of happening.

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Let us know the greatest moment of your music career.

We met Alan Johnson from Peep Show. That was a great moment. He ended up buying a CD from us.

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Discuss your experience pertaining to live performances, gigs, shows, and tours.

Our first show was at a bar in Scarborough called Cellars. I think we used some speakers from a home stereo instead of a PA! The poster was a piece of A4 Pete had drawn a buffalo on.

 

Musically I’m sure it was a massive shamble, but we were so excited, I don’t think any of us would have noticed that it sounded awful.

 

We were paid £100 cash and at the time we thought that was an incredible sum to make from playing music!

 

Since then we’ve had the pleasure of playing abroad quite a lot and some interesting experiences we wouldn’t have otherwise had.

 

But on the flip side, we’ve also spent what feels like a considerable amount of our lives sat in the back of a van.

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Explain what you have in mind before considering music as a career.

The band was kind of born of late nights spent together getting drunk, listening to Bob Dylan bootlegs and watching music docs, we kind of just fell into it and didn’t consider much else career-wise!

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Name the artists that have influenced the world.

Well… blues music seems to have been the basis of rock & roll, which is where we take our musical cues from, so… Muddy Waters and co for sure.

 

Chuck Berry introduced a more aggressive electric guitar sound that featured in rock music for the next 60 years.

 

The Beatles are the biggest influence in so many ways, they kind of wrote the rulebook for bands!

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Discuss your moment of rejections as a musician/artist and how you cope and move on with your career.

Early on, in the band we had many cases of the trail going cold with labels, agents and managers, etc. but we always stuck to our guns and kept on doing what we wanted to do. I think if you’re doing that then you can’t go wrong.

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Tell us the most negative comment you have ever received.

We once had a residency at a place in York called The Black Swan, which is apparently ‘the most haunted pub’ in the area or something….

 

We had just finished our set and were chatting with the audience outside when a guy asked Robbie ‘So how did you find out about this group then?’ apparently unaware he had been watching him all night.

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State your artist’s name and elaborate on it.

The Buffalo Skinners was named after Woody Guthrie’s ballad of the working man’s revenge.

 

In the song, the Buffalo drover doesn’t pay his cowboys, so they leave him for dead. We thought it was a good message to send out to people booking us for gigs…

 

When we named the band, we were heavily into Bob Dylan and anyone who gets into Dylan can’t help being stung by his enthusiasm for Woody.

 

Cate Downey - Boulder

Cate Downey – Boulder

 

Cate Downey - Boulder

Cate Downey – Boulder

 

Artist Name:  Cate Downey

 

Song Title:  Boulder

 

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Name the artists that have influenced you so far.

Some of the Artists that influence my writing include Maggie Rogers, Queen, Alec Benjamin, The Beatles, Billie Eilish and so many more!

 

For me, I think it’s important to draw influence from a variety of genres and styles.

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Mention the name of the artist you can regard as the “Greatest Of All Time.”

The Beatles for sure. They wrote over two hundred songs that were all about love that were all catchy and unique at the same time.

 

The music from the Beatles is music that has really stood the test of time through several decades and that is something that I will always admire and strive for.

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Discuss composition.

I wrote the song “BOULDER” in one day with producer and fellow classmate Alton Sato.

 

Before going into the session with Alton I was sifting through some song ideas on my phone and found the line, “I heard you went back to Boulder.” I wrote that line after hearing that one of my friends from high school had moved back to our hometown after dropping out of college. It was something that I hadn’t expected to happen and I kept having the thought “is he happy now?” As soon as I wrote it down, I knew it was something that I wanted to write a song about. Once we came up with the intro, I started singing those lines over the loop and wrote the rest of the song shortly after.

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Share your press releases and reviews with us.

Turtle Tempo

 

Global Pop

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Elaborate on this song.

I’m currently studying songwriting at a new music production school, the Lillehammer Institute of Music Production and Industries in Lillehammer, Norway.

 

Here we are put into groups every week and are given the task to write, record, produce and submit a song by the end of the week…

 

My friend and fellow classmate Alton and I made ‘Boulder’ as part of one of these assignments. When we first got the initial idea for the song on Monday of that week, we both fell in love with it, which is a big part of why the song progressed so quickly.

 

We also had a lot of the same ideas and visions for the song and both wanted it to be more out-of-the-box, so when it came to production it was a pretty easy process!

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Rate social media and tell us the platform that works best for you in promoting your music.

Instagram works best for me! You can find me @catedowney or here Instagram

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State the areas that need improvement in the music industry.

Right now, we are living in the digital age of music which is both a great new advantage for musicians and a huge crux.

 

This digital age has made it easier for independent artists like me to be heard which is wonderful.

 

But it has also lowered the number of income artists and songwriters get for their songs.

 

I think the industry needs to drastically improve the way that musicians and especially songwriters are paid for their work on streaming platforms such as Spotify and Apple Music.

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Explain how you are getting your songs to stores and getting it to fans.

I have been self-releasing through platforms such as Distrokid and Cd Baby.

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Tell us how you prepare yourself for a live performance or show.

I try not to rehearse exactly what I’m going to say during the show.

 

I have found that leaving a set mostly unscripted allows me to be more genuine in the delivery. I do rehearse the set before the show until I feel that I have it memorized. I want to make sure people are getting to see and hear what they paid for!

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Tell us your opinion on frequent releasing of singles or just an album in a while.

As a listener, I prefer singles that lead up to an album instead of a constant string of singles. I am a sucker for the anticipation of an upcoming album.

 

While we are living in what some may call the “ age of singles “ I still love albums because I think albums allow artists to be more creative and artistic because not every song has to be a “hit” and they allow listeners to digest the music and the artist more than singles do.

 

I hope to see more album releases by major artists soon!

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Mention the name of the artist you will be glad to see the live performance.

I would absolutely love to see Queen in concert. I think that their live performance, especially Freddie Mercury’s stage presences would be something that I would be honoured to witness.

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Tell us the themes of most of your songs.

I have always tried my best to be open and honest in my songs. Most of the themes in my songs center around love/heartbreak as well as mental health. Because I started off writing in the folk genre, I would say many of my songs have storytelling aspects as well.

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Discuss your recording.

The production of the song brings out a lot of its character.

 

The song was produced by my friend and fellow classmate Alton Sato.

 

We both went into the session wanting to be experimental in the production and I think you can hear a lot of the experimentation in the final recording.

 

We were originally inspired by the song “Dirty Af1s” by Alexander 23…

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Tell us how boring or exciting the music career can be.

A career in music can be a lot of things but I can tell you for sure that it’s never boring.

 

I am constantly on my toes both because of both the excitement and the fear of it all.

 

It can be a nerve-cracking career at times, but it is also the most rewarding.

 

Being able to do what I love for a living is the most amazing thing and although it’s an untraditional career path I can’t see myself doing anything else. And while yes, this career path is untraditional.

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State your artist’s name and elaborate on it.

My artist’s name is “Cate Downey” which is my real name. Because my songs are so personal and minimalistic it would have felt ingenuine to go by another name.

 

 

I think using my real name keeps the music open and vulnerable.

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State the title of the song and the meaning.

The title of the song is “Boulder” which is the name of a mountain town in Colorado about thirty minutes from where I grew up.

 

I have always wanted to write a song about Colorado, and I knew that this was the song and the story that I wanted to tell.

 

Romel + Sweet Billy Boy

Romel + Sweet Billy Boy

 

Romel + Sweet Billy Boy

Romel + Sweet Billy Boy

 

Artist: Romel + Sweet Billy Boy

 

Release: Mind Blown

 

Label: Grafton Recordings

 

Genre: Pop/Funk

 

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“Romel is an artist who has a unique approach to his sound”

  • Band Camp Diaries

 

Having played to sold-out clubs in Coventry, whooped up the crowds on the floats at Notting Hill Carnival and recently supported Burna Boy, UK based Grafton Entertainment afro-pop artist Romel comes with his latest release, Mind Blown featuring Sweet Billy Boy.

 

Produced by Slic Vic (currently producing Tinie Tempah and signed to Tinie’s Imhotep/Sony ATV label), plus Kansas City-based Matthew Boda (part of the US music production house JTL Group), new single Mind Blown originally came about as a freestyle jam when working with Slic Vic at Pirate Studios – a place where many top artists have worked including BRIT & NME Award winner Kate Nash. Once the track was bangin’

 

Romel invited a friend and fellow singer Sweet Billy Boy (who’s been enjoying support for his own work recently from BBC Three Counties DJ Edward Adoo) to spit some verses to complete the production.

 

On the making of the track, Romel says “I was not meaning to write a song like Mind Blown but it just poured out of me in a wave of positivity. This was after spending a fair few years of not working with the right teams, but then things started to go well, and working with Slic Vic was part of that transition.

 

The spontaneity is really infectious, and at this point in time I’m in a perfect space with the songs flowing nicely”.

 

Mind Blown is Romel’s fifth single release and follows three singles from last year: Tonight, Summertime and Paradise, which between them, picked up strong support on UK regional stations plus rave reviews in Flava Mag, Vents and other online publications.

 

Raised in London and of Nigerian descent, Romel started his musical journey rapping at various open-mics and studio sessions, until a producer heard his voice and suggested he sing instead, changing the course of his style completely.

 

Taking inspiration from the likes of Khalid and Pharrell Williams, Romel eventually started working with Grafton Entertainment and toured Nigeria with Grafton & MTV Base Africa alongside artists Mr 2Kay, Ill Bliss, Tha Suspect, and Jaywon plus MTV Base presenter Ehiz.

 

Otherwise, Romel has also featured in videos for Davido’s hit song IF (which won Best Pop Single and Song Of The Year at Nigeria’s Headies Awards), Wondering by Mo ft. Chip plus Chicken Curry by Mr. Eazi ft. Sneakbo & Just Sul.

 

Outside of music, Romel appeared in Bengali movie Bhaijaan Elo Re, which was the fastest Bengali movie soundtrack to hit a million views in 24 hours. He’s also had cameo appearances in the short film Lucid, plus the BBC comedy show Famalam.

 

The year 2020 looks to be the best one yet for upcoming afro-pop artist Romel…

 

Raised in London, Romel grew up listening to an eclectic mix of music, before taking his first steps into performing, originally as a rapper.

 

One producer advised him to move into singing after hearing his voice, changing the course of his style completely.

 

Romel got his first taste of touring with Grafton Entertainment and MTV Base Africa in 2014, before releasing his debut single ‘Good Guy’ in mid-2016.

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Tell us how you develop your sound and style to make it different from other musicians.

I don’t know but for some reason, songs come to my head and I just try to develop the song in a way that it appeals to me. And when I try to make it, I just do it my way.

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Tell us your opinion on the way new artists are coming up and the frequent release of songs.

It is interesting; it gives everyone a chance, but good songs also get forgotten easily. And you can easily get lost in the crowd these days.

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Tell us about your experience as a musician/artist.

It has been a journey of failures and Triumph, I had to learn everything myself, which means I had to make a lot of mistakes.

 

I’ve performed everywhere from pubs to bars when I started out. I remember going out to beg DJs to play my song and all. And I would never take those days back because they helped me value where I am today.

 

It was even when I met my Grafton records years ago that helped put me in the right direction and taking me on my first tour that changed a lot for me.

 

One of my funniest experiences was when my dad threatened to kick me off stage when I told him I was performing because he wanted me to go to the University ha-ha, but when he got there he saw me performing and I had the club dancing and screaming. So, he changed his mind and started telling people around me that he was my dad ha-ha.

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Tell us your opinion on streaming and digital download of songs.

If you’ve ever given out CDs before you will appreciate the digital streaming side of things. I think it’s good, but I think streaming is more effective because plays still count even years later, unlike downloads.

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Tell us your goals and plans.

Like what I call myself “The Prince of Pop” I want to live up to that name. I want to create my own lane where I can’t be compared with anyone. Awards are not really my things but if it comes it comes.

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Tell us five current artists that are your favourite.

Ha-ha, Easy! Burna Boy, Calvin Harris, Jax Jones, Mark Ronson, Dua Lipa.

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Tell us your favourite song up to date and share the link.

At this moment I have “Don’t Start Now” by Dua Lipa on repeat, can’t get enough of it. It is even the soundtrack of my dreams ha-ha.

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Tell us your dream and hope for the future.

I have always had this dream of performing in one of the biggest award shows and giving them the best performance, they have ever seen, and it’s going to happen.  I just don’t hope but know that in the nearest future I would be given the recognition I deserve.

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Tell us what has changed in the music industry.

I think the music industry is more business than art now. So, people focus on what’s trending other than trying to make something original.

 

An example is sometimes you meet a producer or Record Label and they say they want a song like this or that, so you go into the studio thinking about what you want the song to sound like rather than just letting it flow.

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Tell us your opinion on television/radio stations playing the same songs from established artists and giving little chances to independent artists.

It still falls to what I said about the business side of the industry taking over.

 

It’s a food chain so you must work extra hard to be seen which is better so whenever you get your chance you can value it more than when it is handed over to you easily because of your talent.

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Tell us the challenges independent artists are facing and how to tackle them.

I think it’s all about funds to run the best campaign to get noticed, but sometimes it’s not all about the funds it’s also knowing the right place to spend the funds to get good results.

 

We’ve all lost money trying to get noticed which is not too bad because labels too have lost money investing in the wrong artist and songs too, so it is fair, but just harder since for an independent artist, funds are limited, and before you can raise the money to try again people would have moved on from you since it is a fast industry.

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Share your press releases and reviews with us.

BBC Northampton Hit, Miss, Maybe

Graffiti Vibe

 

Nova Music

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Tell us your opinion on using social media to promote music online.

I think it doesn’t only give artists the chance to promote their music but also gives you the opportunity to create how you want to be seen.

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Tell us about your music career.

I have just been riding the wave. Everything is all progressing; I just let my music lead the way.

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Tell us what still motivates you to go on with your music career.

To be very honest, I know I am good at what I do, so I believe very soon I would get what I deserve.

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Tell us about you as a person.

I am a very weird person who likes weird things ha-ha.

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Elaborate on the story behind the song.

I was just telling a story of having enough of being played and being told what to do, but that I’m doing fine by doing things my way.

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Tell us the process involved in making this song.

I never had a song like Mind Blown in mind when I started making the song. I just got to the studio that day with the producer Slic Vic (who is the producer of Top Winners by Tinie and Not3s) and I just told him I wanted a pop-funk song and he just started working on it and I just came with the “Oh I can’t deny it, Tanana Tanana…” and that was it. I just put everything together and in less than two hours we were done.

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State your artist’s name and elaborate on it.

I go by the name Romel, which is my actual first name because I tried to go for something cooler than Romel. But there’s nothing cooler than Romel.

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State the title of the song and the meaning.

The title of the song is ‘Mind Blown’ and it simply means something surprising that your brain can’t understand. Which is what I’m about to do.

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State the title of your upcoming album and the reason for choosing the title.

I haven’t chosen a title yet which I would like to keep a secret until then.

 

Giudi – Sleeping Boy

 

Giudi - Sleeping Boy

Giudi – Sleeping Boy

 

Giudi – Sleeping Boy

 

ARTIST NAME: Giudi

 

SONG TITLE:  Sleeping Boy

 

RELEASE DATE: 18/02 /20

 

GENRE: Alt Pop

 

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One of the most creative artists currently in music Alt Pop star Giudi combines music with fashion and visual arts, featuring issues such as sustainable Fashion and Diversity in society.

 

She has toured across Europe, much in demand as a featured performer at many international fashion events as well as music festivals also working with many international fashion designers.

 

Before becoming a solo artist in 2017, Giudi’s music journey included fronting a rock band and even managing to find herself in the Final of Czech/Slovak X Factor as well as getting the Silver Award for new artist at the 2018 Czech Music Awards.

 

Now signed to the UK label Minimal Surface, Giudi has been busy recording a new album set for release in May 2020.

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Explain how to overcome a writer’s block.

For me, reconnecting with nature works, going to the woods, visiting my favourite mountain views.

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Tell us the tricks behind making a hit song.

I would say that the real magic happens when the universe gives you touch, it’s like blowing wind and happens only if you are ready and bright and catch it.

 

For me, an authentic feeling and a real story behind it are always essential for a great song. After all of this, there needs to be of course great production and a sound like edible stardust on the top of the muffin.

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Tell us how you get feedback for your demo before working on it.

If I need to pick tracks to finish from my demos to record, I’ll play them to my producer or I do some A&R consulting with my label Minimal Surface, but at the end of the day it’s always my choice, I need to feel that I want to do that song and I have something to say.

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Explain your recording experience in the studio.

I prefer older, smaller studios with a cozy atmosphere. Where I can just cut off from the rest of the world, be lost for a day and live for the moment. Like this, I can really enjoy the process.

 

Most of these studios I used to record are underground, but my dream is to record somewhere in the middle of nowhere by the forest with beautiful panoramas, mountains, and lakes; I would just leave my soul in such a place.

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Tell us how you compose.

I spend a lot of time in an airplane or travelling in the car, so the best choice for me is Garageband or Gadget Le app on my phone and after sending it directly to my producer or putting it into my computer and tighten it up in Logic, for example adding some guitars or better vocals and harmonies.

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Tell us if you add effects to your vocals to sound better.

It depends on what suits each song. I enjoy the contrasts so usually in verses I like a dry and natural voice, and in the chorus, I play with all sorts of reverbs, distortions or even harmonizers.

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Tell us the best streaming platform to get new fans.

The biggest rush of fans always comes every time I appear on TV, they usually go to my Instagram and YouTube first.

 

Also, obviously Spotify, its discovery and algorithmic playlists are great for the musicians to be discovered by the audience.

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Tell us your opinion on music education.

Music education gives way to more options for one’s career.

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Discuss the shooting of a commercial music video for a song.

The visual part of the creative process is very important to me. It’s just the way I get closer to my visions for the track and it opens a new dimension…

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Tell us how you relate with other artists.

It’s 2020 and I can say that almost every single day I discover new artists, there are really a lot of amazing new artists, and that is always an inspiration to try to make even better music.

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Tell us if you can collaborate with an artist of a different genre.

Sure, I can, hopefully I will do more. I consider myself a ‘genre-fluid’ musician so I really enjoy playing with different genres.

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Explain how to finance a music project.

One of the options is to build up a cool and authentic image, then you can find some sponsors.

 

You can start a collab with some cool brands or music organizations. Play shows. Sell merchandise. Make good music and people will find you and want to get involved, the internet has made it so much easier to get yourself out there.

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Tell us how to generate income from a musical work.

One part of the income you can earn by touring, live shows and selling your merchandise.

 

Another from streaming platforms. It’s also important to be signed up to rights organizations, that collect money for you when it’s played live or on the radio.

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List the name of organizations you know can be helpful to new artists.

I think in the UK you have PRS, we have OSA, which collects money for artists when they perform.

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Send a message to your fans

“Let your light shine out.”

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Explain the process involved in recording a vocal.

So, the vocal part of the recording process is fun, but sometimes it depends on different circumstances that can slightly change the process.

 

If I am rested, in the right mood or it depends also on the woman cycle because it affects the vocal cords.

 

There are so many factors that can make a good vocal, but it is important to sing out your true feelings. When you can sing your soul can speak.

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Elaborate on the song.

‘Sleeping Boy’ is the story of a young boy who lives a stereotyped life.

 

Time to time he meets completely openminded people, from whom he felt freedom.

 

He starts to dream about his transformation and free himself from these shackles.

 

In the music video, I wanted to demonstrate, through contemporary dance, the pressures of society and mental health issues.

 

We were shooting in the Prague Metro and the main actor was a talented dancer and queer model Matej Psenicka.

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Elaborate on your artist name and the title of the album.

My friends in Italy started to call me Giudi, the Italian version of my name and since that time it seemed to stick.

 

My first album is going to be called “The Fountain” – the symbol of joy and peace.

 

The water represents the energy in each level, the eternal nature of this mystical dimension and the infinite nature of its source. There is only one source and it’s endless.

 

A fountain also has different floors and levels – like my musical taste as well. I consider myself like “genre-fluid” musician.

 

Rollin Rosatti - Surrender

Rollin Rosatti – Surrender

 

Rollin Rosatti - Surrender

Rollin Rosatti – Surrender

 

Artist Name:  Rollin Rosatti

 

Song Title:  Surrender

 

 

 

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Rollin Rosatti is a soul artist from Memphis, Tennessee.

 

He draws his inspiration from the historic sounds of the southern delta, bringing to light a mixture of blues, roots rock and gospel.

 

The vintage sound and feel of his hometown of Memphis influenced him.

 

Travelling to his origin is an important aspect of his creative journey in creating his art.

 

World Goes Round - Big House

World Goes Round – Big House

World Goes Round - Big House

World Goes Round – Big House

 

Artist Name:  World Goes Round

 

Song Title:  Big House

 

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A bunch of ridiculously hedonistic people live it up in a big mansion high on a hill, while down below the world is burning and choking on filthy polluted air. Nero is fiddling while Rome burns. These hedonists, in their ‘Big House’, are carefree while the rest of the world suffers.

 

After visiting the Amazon in Peru, Brazil and Venezuela, vocalist Frank Musker had seen first-hand the damage caused to the Amazon by the greed of the West. Hence the line ‘In the time it takes to sing this song, another thousand acres will be gone.’

 

At the time ‘Big House’ was written in the 1980s, it was a couple years before the Berlin Wall came down and the concerns of refugees fleeing from behind the Iron Curtain is also voiced in the song: ‘Well there’s a man in East Berlin, all he wants is a ticket on a westbound train.’

 

It is poignant that a song written three decades ago sheds light on precisely the same issues we face today – the refugee problem has only got worse, as has the vast destruction of the Amazon.

 

​In fact, ‘Big House’ feels even more relevant now than it did then, because of the likes of Extinction Rebellion, David Attenborough, Greta Thunberg etc. Only now are people really starting to take note as these issues are in the mainstream of public and political debate.

 

The song was written as a wake up call thirty years ago. It’s time to wake up now.

 

More!

It’s 1989 in Los Angeles – four friends create an album which will only be heard for the first time THIS APRIL 2020.

 

‘Big House’ is the first release from the long-anticipated album by World Goes Round

 

About thirty years ago record producer Tommy Vicari (Taste of Honey, Billy Idol, Prince) recorded and produced an album with Frank Musker, Elizabeth Lamers, Jeff Hull and Marty Walsh – four good friends who were hot songwriters, singers, and musicians working at that time in the LA music scene of 1989. They called themselves ‘World Goes Round.’

 

Between them they had either written for, sung with or played on records by a string of major artists and producers like Linda Ronstadt, Queen, Chaka Khan, Brenda Russell, Jeffrey Osborne, John Denver, Supertramp, John Fogerty, Quincy Jones, Arif Mardin, Air Supply – the list is too long to quote in full.

 

Lyrics:

What kind of damn do you give?

Do you know how the other three quarters live?

You say that you do but you don’t have a clue

 

Sing – oh weh oh weh oh weh oh,

 

Oh weh oh weh oh

 

You can see it on the streets in your neighborhood

What you mean? We never had it so good

 

Living in a big house – up on the hill

We’re all living it up while somebody else – pays the bill

Well it’s a sweet life – as long as it lasts

Living in a big world – but it’s shrinking fast

Living in a big house

Living in a big big house up on the hill  (let me in)

 

Well there’s a man in East Berlin

All he wants is a ticket on a westbound train (ya see)

It’s not the same everywhere but I guess you don’t care

 

So we do the dance – take it for granted

You tell the truth – they don’t understand it

 

In the time it takes to sing this song

Another thousand acres – will be gone

 

Living in a big house – up on the hill

We’re all living it up while somebody else – pays the bill

Well it’s a sweet life – as long as it lasts

Living in a big world – but it’s shrinking fast

Living in a big house

Living in a big big house up on the hill

 

Real life… You can have it – you can keep it to yourself

You can feed it to the sharks – I don’t wanna know

We can only – help you if you don’t need help

Oh no no no – Sorry!

 

Living in a big house – up on the hill

We’re all living it up while somebody else – pays the bill

Well it’s a sweet life – as long as it lasts

Living in a big world – but it’s shrinking fast

Living in a big house

Living in a big big house up on the hill

 

Save me save me save me save me

 

Matty Ride - Lower Case Love

Matty Ride – Lower Case Love

 

Matty Ride - Lower Case Love

Matty Ride – Lower Case Love

 

ARTIST NAME: Matty Ride

 

SONG TITLE: Lower Case Love

 

GENRE: Vintage Pop

 

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Originally hailing from the Pacific Northwest, Matty Ride grew up in the very stomping grounds and hometown of Bing Crosby. It’s there that his love for the great singers of the American Songbook such as Nat King Cole, Sinatra and of course Bing Crosby, took hold.

 

Now based in Nashville, Matty Ride recaptures the spirit of the American Songbook through his original ‘Vintage pop’ compositions.

 

His clever rhymes, tongue in cheek topics, and witty lyrics showcase an urbane sense of style and playfulness.

 

Ask Matty Ride to describe his music and he’ll tell you with a laugh, “I’m just making the type of music your grandparents made your parents to.”

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Go into detail on why you decided to choose music as a career.

I’ve always loved music from a young age, and I came from a pretty musical family.

 

Both my dad and my grandpa played, as well as lots of singers in the family, so it was something that I feel was passed on to me.

 

I studied International Business and Spanish in college, but I always knew as soon as I had gotten my degree I was jumping back into music.  And that’s what I did, I headed off to Nashville and been here ever since making music.

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Brief us on the feedback you are getting from fans on your music.

The feedback has been positive.  I think a lot of people like the fact that the music is very different from other stuff people are doing these days.  It catches people by surprise because they hear the music and it reminds them of a bygone era.  That’s what I love!  I’m not trying to reinvent the wheel with my music, just my own original songs in the vein of the American Songbook as if it continued on into today.

 

Some people have mentioned that they think the music is “timeless” or “classic.”  That to me is a really encouraging compliment.

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Discuss the relevance of social networking to music.

It’s crucial.  I think in order to succeed in today’s music environment you must be putting your music out in the social realm.

 

The downside is there is so much music out there to compete with, but the positive is that the traditional gatekeepers that would allow your music to be heard by the public don’t play as big of a role anymore.  Anybody can put their music out there now for the whole world to hear……… possibly …….hopefully…

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Tell us how you record your song.

We filmed the video for my song “Lower Case Love” in Ocean Way Studio A in Nashville where I recorded my upcoming project, that I will be releasing as singles and EPs throughout this year.

 

The way we have the studio set up in the video is pretty much how we recorded all the songs during those sessions, including “Lower Case Love,” which was mostly live.

 

I wanted to try and capture that live performance energy, which is something that so many great artists I love from the 1940s/50s were doing at that time in the studio.  There wasn’t any overdubbing in the recording process.  They would set up all the musicians in the same room and hit record.

 

I always told myself, if I was going to do this project, we had to do it the right way, the way it would’ve been done, and that was with all the musicians recording live in the same room.

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Tell us the story behind the song.

Hollywood sells us on instant romance, but love is a slow burn.  I wrote this song as a tongue in cheek way to say, take it seriously, but seriously…. take your time.

 

So, for all those feeling the pressure of finding love, I say, ‘“Only time will tell if it’s ‘love’ with a capital “L”, but for now the lower case will do.”

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State your musical skills.

I mostly play guitar and piano, but I also play some bass and various other instruments enough to record a little on them.

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Tell us how long it takes to complete a song from the start.

Every song is completely different.  There is no magical formula for inspiration or completion, so it’s hard to say.  Some songs take 15 minutes, and others take 2 years.

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Go into detail on how you develop your lyrics and melody.

Well, for many of the songs on my project, including “Lower Case Love,” I usually start out with a phrase or tagline that I want to write the song about.

 

I often will keep a notebook or notes on my phone of phrases that I might hear in conversations or read somewhere, and then I go from there.

 

 

I tell my family and friends to be careful about what they talk about with me in conversation because it might end up in my song lyrics.

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Discuss your music in full detail.

It’s basically throwback music to a bygone era.  I write original songs in the vein of the American Songbook.

 

I love the great Jazz/big band singers like Nat King Cole, Bing Crosby, Sinatra, Ella Fitzgerald, and those are some of my big inspirations.

 

I’m aware those are terribly high bars to aim for, but those are what I want my music to aspire to.

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State your five favourite genres of music with reasons.

Jazz: for the chords and musical arrangements

 

Hip Hop: for the beats

 

Soul: For the pocket and feeling

 

Rock: For the energy

 

Acoustic: For the chill nature.

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Discuss your rehearsal.

The band is always changing sizes depending on the venue of the upcoming gig, so it all depends.

 

 

Usually, rehearsals are tricky to coordinate with such a big band but quite necessary to make all the musical arrangements that go into my songs.

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State your favourite musical instruments.

Guitar, Piano, Bass.

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Describe the chemistry between you and your fans during a live performance.

I have fun and I hope that comes across.  I think it does.  They really like watching the big band play through all the arrangements.  I think people appreciate the live nature of the instrumentation.

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Discuss your personality in full detail.

I’m a pretty chill guy off stage. I joke and say I’m an introvert with above-average social skills.

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Discuss your music career.

It’s a slow grind.  Sometimes it’s hard, sometimes it’s happy, but it’s always worth it.

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List your musical work.

I’m just starting out this new artist stuff as Matty Ride, so this is the beginning, so come along on the journey with me and let’s find out!

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Share your memorable experiences with us.

Anytime I’m making music with my super talented friends in Nashville!  Those are my best memories.

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Share your press releases and reviews with us.

Nashville-based crooner, Matty Ride is back with new music! The first of many singles to come, “Lower Case Love,” an upbeat and playful record and music video, was released on February 14, 2020.

 

When asked about the inspiration behind this upbeat and playful track, Ride says:

 

“Hollywood sells us on instant romance, but in reality, love is a slow burn. I wrote this song as a tongue in cheek way to say, take it seriously, but seriously… take your time. Because the quicker you get it, the cheaper it is.  And the cheaper it is, the sooner we move on to something else.

 

But love is a four-letter word spelled T-I-M-E, and time is the currency of love. Where you invest your time, there your heart is also. So, for all those feeling the pressure of Valentine’s Day, I say, ‘Only time will tell if it’s ‘love’ with a capital ‘L’, but for now the lower case will do.’”

 

Matty Ride recaptures the spirit of the American Songbook through his original ‘Vintage pop’ compositions.

 

 

His warm crooning vocal style, paired with his up-tempo big band arrangements and sentimental ballads reflect these inspirations of yesteryear and give a nod to the modern-day likes of Harry Connick Jr, Michael Bublé and Jamie Cullum.

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State your artist’s name and elaborate on it.

Matty Ride is my artist name.  It’s a nickname I’ve had since I was younger.

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State the title of the song and the meaning.

The song is called “Lower Case Love.”  It’s a playful song about not rushing love but giving it time.

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State the title of the album and the reason for choosing the title.

It’s a single release. But it will be put out on an upcoming EP with some other original tunes!

 

Rene Byrd – Born Again

Rene Byrd – Born Again

 

Rene Byrd – Born Again

Rene Byrd – Born Again

 

ARTIST NAME: Rene Byrd

 

SONG TITLE: Born Again

 

DATE: 10th February 2020

 

GENRE: R&B Pop

 

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The latest artist to bring a fresh new take on the soul and pop genres is the talented singer and songwriter, Rene Byrd. A driven musician with a powerful voice, her heartfelt lyrics are set to touch listeners across the globe.

 

Rene Byrd’s passion for singing began from a very young age when she participated in numerous talent contests namely an inter-college competition based in London which nurtured stars like Daniel and Natasha Bedingfield. These successfully placed her as one of the top talents in the UK.

 

At the age of 14, Rene joined a band as a backup vocalist, paving the way for her career in the music industry. A star was born.

 

Rene is third generation West Indian and she comes from a religious and musical background.

 

Her father was a music producer and her uncle is a Gospel singer, now internationally known as ‘Bishop John Francis,’ whose choir sang for HRH Majesty the Queen at the Royal Variety Show. John Francis also had a gospel TV show broadcasted on Channel 4, called ‘People Get Ready.’ Rene recalls that it ‘was a regular occurrence to see my uncle on TV and he inspired me to sing. His voice is amazing!’

 

‘One of my most vivid memories as a child was being side-stage at an open-air concert in London. I watched Sade, Sting and Tracey Chapman perform and it blew me away. Something inside made me run on to the stage and grab the mic and spoke to the crowd. Thankfully security just let me be then guided me back to my seat and from that day it was a clear sign that the stage was my home.

 

Through my experiences and observation of others in love, sadness, hope, and joy my first album was born. It’s surreal being an artist. Not one day is the same and there is so much to consider writing good songs that connect with your audience, your image, and your performance… the list is endless.

 

 

I believe in hard work and dedication and I’m involved in all aspects of my brand; from overseeing the final cut of my songs to the artwork on the CD.’

 

Some of Rene’s past performances and guest appearances include a show at the world-famous Elstree Film Studios, the TG Foundation’s charity event featuring Lady Gaga’s designer Vera Thordardottir, Haute Couture Fashion Week in Paris and ’Live at Delancey Street, Performance for BET America with Traci Ellis Ross for her show ’Read Between the Lines.’ An electric night with Rene Byrd at Annabel’s Private Members Club in Mayfair London. Her performance at the National Art Gallery for the Prime Minister of Lithuania accompanied by band members that work with George Michael and Emeli Sandé.

 

 

Roy Francis (Roy Francis Productions) will work to promote Rene in both the UK and American markets; they have been responsible for producing shows and appearances for acts such as Michelle Williams (Destiny Child), Mary Mary and Trey Songz. Tez-lee Rene’s younger brother, UK’s answer to Usher has also performed alongside Rene and produced numerous tracks for her album.

 

Rene has recently become involved in ‘Teens Unite’ the charity founded by Karen Millen OBE and is an ambassador for ‘The Nelson Mandela Children’s Fund.’

 

She recently got involved with Target Ovarian Cancer Charity to help to create awareness and aid fundraising. She works with Rochay Elite who provides intelligence and services to the Ultra High Net Worth and Super Rich consisting of the UK & Global Rich List in the Luxury Sector.

 

 

Rene Byrd has teamed up with numerous inspiring international businesses to help endorse their brands through her image. Among these brands are Fashion Fair Cosmetics part of Johnson Publishing USA; they publish ‘Ebony Magazine and Jet the most successful African American lifestyle magazines, Sonata Luxury Lingerie line as featured in ‘Vogue’ Katherine Elizabeth (London-based Milliner who designed for Dita Von Teese), Luxury shoe designer Aruna Seth as worn by Pippa Middleton at the marriage of HRH, Save Your Soles, Convopiece showcasing innovative and unique watch brands with exquisite luxury, La Diosa London based Luxury Jewellery who have designed pieces for Oprah, Michelle Obama and HRH Duchess of Cambridge, Aiisha Ramadan Dubai based designer and her style consultant.

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Tell us your source of inspiration. 

I am inspired by my life and the observation of others. The journey of life has many twists and turns highs and lows; my greatest source is watching life unfold. I also come from a musical family.

 

My father was in a band that was signed to RCA Records in the 1980s and my uncle is internationally known as ‘Bishop John Francis,’ whose choir sung for HRH Majesty the Queen at the Royal Variety Show.

 

My uncle had a gospel TV show broadcasted on Channel 4 called ‘People Get Ready.’ It was a regular occurrence to see both my father and my uncle on the TV, so naturally, both inspired me to sing.

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Discuss how you develop your music style. 

I grew up listening and watching some of the most iconic artists of this era to name a few; Michael Jackson, Whitney Houston, Billy Holiday the list is endless.

 

I will literally sit and watch and copy the sound, the mood their vocals which would sometimes bring me to tears, their talent was overwhelming and displayed total excellence.

 

My musical background and family had great influence on how I developed my music style, it was a regular occurrence to hear R&B, Soul, Gospel, Funk, Latin, Reggae, Jazz and Pop on vinyl, which gave me the opportunity to be exposed at a very young age to the very best music has to offer.

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Elaborate on multi-genre music. 

My understanding of multi-genre music is music that doesn’t fall into one music category; so, an artist’s song could be both rap and pop and folk for instance. I love this as music is self-expression.

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Tell us the best means of reaching fans. 

The world is much smaller, thanks to the invention of the Internet and especially the explosion of social media.

 

Social media was a god-sent for me to engage in real-time with my fans on a global scale. I must admit as new technology moves so fast; this can be hard to keep up with the newest trend.

I decided to stick to social media platforms such as Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter, these have been my biggest ways to connect and reach fans all around the world.

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Discuss the process involved in launching a musical career.  

The music industry is not for the fainthearted, so you must be extremely thick-skinned to navigate the very competitive landscape.

 

There is no hard and fast rule but have a great song that you believe in, think about what message you want to covey, your story, your audience, your image.

 

Put together a team of people you can trust, so they can help with the numerous roles required to help launch your career.

 

Find great producers to help create your musical masterpiece, a manager to help with your representation, locate venues and opportunities to perform/gig.

 

Network like crazy, it’s not what you are, it’s who you know! Remove any trace of ego learn how to take constructive critic this industry is ruthless, so you must learn this early on in your career.

 

Perseverance is key there will be many disappointments and rejections but never let this stop your drive and focus; many of the most successful artists in the world were rejected but now they are multi-million selling artists.

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Tell us how to develop a lyric to a full song. 

I usually start with a story then a melody and then a hook – a catchy chorus.

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Tell us how you come up with a melody. 

I find a melody that works with the story for a fast song, the melody will usually have movement. If the song is a ballad (slow song) the melody is relaxed and soothing.

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Tell us your ideal type of recording studio.  

Homely environment, preferably near water, beach or river, with a chef, bar and sleeping quarter, total bliss.

 

The most advanced technical gear and equipment and enough space for a band or orchestra, a control room and vocal booth.

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Describe the factors you consider in a good song. 

Strong melody, great hook and memorable…

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Tell us how you impact your listeners with your songs. 

I write and sing songs from the heart, sharing my experiences and observation of others in love, sadness, hope, and joy.

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Tell us how you interact with producers and music directors. 

I work with some amazing producers and very talented music directors.

 

I just let creativity flow organically. There is something that happens when the mood is right, a connection between you and the producers that moment which takes your breath away.

 

The best music is created when off the cuff, real and in the moment cosmic, heavenly out of this world.

 

My main producers are my brothers and cousin, so the family connection has even more impact there, is an element of trust and safety knowing they want the very best for you.

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Tell us how you feel after the completion of a song. 

I usually cry when I listen to the final mix, I have a feeling of excitement and a sense of relief knowing I can move on to the next part of the process.

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Tell us your worst song and state the reason. 

I am my biggest critic so sometimes when I listen back to a recording, I will literally pull it apart. I want my offering to be the very best version of myself.

 

I would say my worst song was when I first started to write, I listen back to them now and cringe, as they were not my best, they lacked the fundamentals of a great song. Thankfully I am much better now.

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Tell us what you will change in your music. 

Music does not stand still; it is like a circle. I want to do my best to stay current, innovative, and honest in my music.

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Tell us what is special about this release. 

It was a long journey to get to this release with many obstacles and blocks. This release and the amazing positive global support made it all worth it and the support has been priceless.

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Tell us about your future goals. 

Complete my album, release more music and start touring.

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Tell us how you overcome obstacles. 

You have one life and whilst you are here on this earth you must do what makes your soul come alive.

 

I would be lying to you if I said this career path is easy, but nothing worth having comes without many trials and tribulations. You will face great moments and hard rejections, but all those things are designed to make you stronger, wiser, and more determined to succeed.

You must train your mindset to be positive and see every opportunity good or bad to grow. Be prepared to give this life your best shot.

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Elaborate on the song. 

A cover song rendition of the classic song originally performed by Billy Preston and Syreeta, ‘Born Again’ tells the story of new beginnings and feeling complete through love and romance.

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Elaborate on your artist’s name and the title of the album. 

My artist name ‘Rene’ which is my legal middle name and means ‘in French ‘Born Again’which is the title of my new single, call it destiny! My second name is ‘Byrd’ like a bird that sings in the trees; my name is ‘Rene Byrd.’

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Share your press release and review with us.

Boardroom to Stage:
Rene Byrd Releases Her New Single and Music Video For ‘Born Again’

 

Rene Byrd is the latest R&B/Pop songstress whose vocal talent has invited the attention of associates of the legendary Quincy Jones.

 

Rene has performed at some of the most talked-about international venues and on behalf of a European Prime Minister.

 

Rene Byrd comes from a corporate background, which funded and elevated her exciting musical career from the boardroom to stage.

 

With her unique voice and engaging live performances, Rene has been creating a social media buzz with an online video that amassed over 50,000 views.

 

Rene’s new single ‘Born Again’ is a heartfelt rendition of the classic song originally performed by Billy Preston and Syreeta.

 

The cover is a title track from the forthcoming album which is due to be released next year.

 

The single is a fusion of salsa and mid-tempo R&B sounds produced by the TJN Music team.

 

‘Born Again’ has a beautiful vocal performance that has captured the interest of audiences in the UK and USA in a short space of time; the single is already receiving rave reviews from radio stations in its initial circulation.

 

The debut single ‘Born Again’ tells the story of new beginnings and feeling complete through love and romance.

 

The lyrics are passionate and honest, and Rene portrays this through her performance as an artist.

 

The accompanying music video directed by Chas Appeti provides warm, soft visuals to bring the story to life.

 

Rene brings her love of luxury fashion to the screen in haute couture; reminiscent of the Rene Byrd brand in its entirety.

 

The pre-release date for the single and accompanying music video is set for the 9th December 2019 with the official UK/Ireland release date on the 10th of February 2020.

 

The Jess Novak Band - Treat Me Right

The Jess Novak Band – Treat Me Right

 

The Jess Novak Band - Treat Me Right

The Jess Novak Band – Treat Me Right

 

ARTIST NAME:  The Jess Novak Band

 

SONG TITLE:  Treat Me Right

 

ALBUM TITLE: Fireworks and Fairytales

 

GENRE: Pop, Rock, Soul

 

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Jess Novak takes no prisoners. With a fiddle on fire, powerful vocals and a fierce band behind her, this pop, rock, soul-pumped group from Syracuse…

 

Known for their energy, superb musicianship, engaging songwriting and ability to win any crowd, this is a band on the rise.

 

Having touched audiences across the country – from Burlington, VT to Key West, FL to San Diego, CA – and with Novak playing more than 250 dates annually, the sound gets tighter with each show.

 

Jess Novak (violin, guitar, vocals, piano, percussion, looping) works with Byron Cage (Tommy Castro, Joe Louis Walker, Otis Taylor) on drums; Anthony Saturno (Atkins Riot) on electric guitar, Jabare Mckinstry (Chris Ames Band) on bass and Gavin George (Strange to Look At, BSG) on drums to create a powerhouse sound, often with Nick Fields on trumpet.

 

Novak’s work is being played on radio stations worldwide (WTYT 960, D.C. Coast to Coast, Women of Substance Radio, IndieOutbreak) and written about at home and across the ocean.

 

Novak has played such prestigious rooms as The Cutting Room (NYC), The Saint (Asbury Park) and Nectar’s (Burlington, VT), opened the 23rd Annual Chenango Blues Festival (with headliner, Ronnie Earl) and performed with groups and artists including Devon Allman, Tas Cru, Jimmy Hall, Ghost Town Blues Band and members of Butch Trucks and the Freight Train Band.

 

Novak released her solo debut album, “Bad Habit”, in December 2013.

 

Her group, The Golden Novak Band, released their self-titled debut album in August 2014 and their follow-up, “Rodeo”, was released in October 2015.

 

The Jess Novak Band released “Inches from the Sun” on November 5, 2016. The album won a Syracuse Area Music Award for Best Pop in March 2017.

 

The band released a live album (Jess Novak Band Live at the Nelson Odeon) in June 2017 and released “Fireworks & Fairytales” in November 2017.

 

On December 31, 2018, Novak released “Fear is the Cage. Love is the Key.” a double-album featuring members of JNB. In October of 2019, Novak released “Rise” with Ben Wayne. The four-song EP features tracks recorded in Nashville, TN with some of the best in the business, including guitarist Jeff King, producer Bill Warner and songwriter Kirsti Manna.

 

Novak has played with projects spanning Ladies Night at the Palace (an all-women show) to Vinyl Albums Live to BeatleCuse, providing a strong musical background, easily adaptable to any situation or genre.

 

She’s been nominated for Best Female Vocalist in the Best of Syracuse competition four times and won the award in 2018.

 

She placed third in the 2016 Country Showdown sponsored by WOLF 92.1FM.

 

Her work spans hip-hop beats to throw-back soul to straight-up pop making for music that engages any listener.

 

Novak was also the cover girl for Syracuse Woman Magazine in September 2016. See it all here.

 

Novak also won the Indigo Productions Songwriter Series in Syracuse for her song “Rat a Tat” in July 2018.

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Tell us your source of inspiration.

Life inspires me. Every day I find myself writing songs in my head based on a word I hear, a conversation I have, a movie I watch. There are so many stories to tell, so I feel constantly inspired all the time.

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Discuss how you develop your music style.

There are a lot of people I admire who can play songs just like they hear them. When they go to cover a song – they do it exactly like the original. I think that’s amazing – and something I can’t do. I can’t help but reinterpret everything I hear.

 

So, my style is based on my constant reinterpretation of everything. All the artists I love the most, idolize, want to be like – I feel like I’m just a reinterpretation of them, so my style is a big mix of characteristics drawn from so many places. The result is a style that’s all mine and I love that. Love it or hate it – it’s distinct and that’s what I want.

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Elaborate on multi-genre music.

I’m bored by albums that sound like one continuous song and so many artists are like that. Often, it’s because they’re encouraged to get a style and stick exactly to that, so fans know what they’re getting. That makes some sense as people like what’s familiar – but as a listener, I think it’s incredibly boring.

 

So, multi-genre music brings pieces of all different types of music and finds a way to make them work together and complement each other. This is especially at work in my band because everyone comes from a wildly different background.

 

My favourite part of making an album with them is the time we sit down, and everyone adds something, and the result is at least five different genres slammed together. You can’t duplicate that. It’s the energy of many people mixed together. I love it so much.

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Tell us the best means of reaching fans.

Being genuine. This comes across on all platforms. Whenever I post something, it’s because it’s important to me and I feel it’s necessary to share it. That’s usually pretty effective in reaching my fans.

 

Likewise, getting out and pounding the pavement is also effective. And when I do and I’m face-to-face with fans – I’m genuine and that’s still the best way to connect then, too. It’s easy to get caught up in the “most effective” platform, but really, I don’t think it matters. I think it comes down to what you’re sharing and how real you are whether it’s face to face or on any of a hundred social networks.

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Discuss the process involved in launching a musical career.

Endless work. Endless determination and tenacity. The process begins when someone tells you you’re good. Then you start playing, creating, being encouraged and you think it’ll just snowball into whatever you want. In some ways it does, or it did for me. Once the ball was rolling, I knew it wouldn’t stop. But it’s fuelled by my work ethic.

 

As you grow as an artist, in what you create, you have to grow as a businessperson, marketing professional, social media manger, booking agent, everything. The process is never-ending and limitless.

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Tell us how to develop a lyric to a full song.

You start with an idea. You have something to say. So, then you start deciding on how you want to say it. Will you tell a story, speak in metaphors, etc. Whenever I get stuck on a song, I just go back to beginning – what am I trying to say? What feeling am I trying to get across? I think if you stick to that, you’ll have better success.

 

I also feel the words and chords need to match, so that helps inform the lyrics. You’ll feel how things fit with the chords, the meter, and it usually comes together naturally. I think the more forced it is, the more you can tell. I’m always about being real.

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Tell us how you come up with a melody.

That usually just happens. When I have something to say, I have a mood in mind. That mood dictates the chords, the scale. Then you start trying melodies within that to build the song. Maybe there are people who do it in a more precise, mathematical way, but I’m all about letting it flow out of me.

 

I think we’re just vessels made to communicate something a little bit beyond us.

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Tell us your ideal type of recording studio.

If I could build it – I would want a huge room, preferably in a cabin in the middle of the woods where it’s totally peaceful and quiet.

 

I’m a big fan of recording live, but with isolation if possible, so a big room, with glass walls, so the band can see each other.

 

When you play live, that’s the energy. It’s the way everyone reads each other but can also close their eyes and feel the music, too.

 

And to be fully in the music, I need to be away from the bustle of life, so being away in the woods is like a dream for recording. In the woods – or at the shore in the winter when it’s peaceful and dead and you can go stare at the ocean anytime you need to restart.

 

For me, recording is intense. You need a place where you can really work and a place where you can really detach. For me, that’s nature – and ocean or woods/mountains are the best for it.

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Describe the factors you consider in a good song.

Soul. I don’t care about the style, the kind of lyrics, the instrumentation, the form, none of that.

 

The key to a good song, to me – is purely about if you can feel it and believe what the artist is communicating.

 

I’m a fan of very clear lyrics, but it isn’t necessary. For example, I love Gwen Stefani. So much of her early No Doubt songs are straightforward, and I love that. You can tell that she means it.

 

But I also love Conor Oberst and Bob Dylan who have very poetic ways of communicating things. And again – you can feel it – in the words, the delivery and the music.

 

I think once a songwriter gets rid of the notion that you need a certain formula to have a great song – the better you’ll be.

 

I have four-chord songs that kill every time. Then I have songs, I think, that are very in the Bob Dylan vein – that don’t have as much success.

 

The idea of a “good song” is difficult to describe because everyone has a different interpretation of that.

 

But I think if you’re real and communicate your soul – you’ve got it.

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Tell us how you impact your listeners with your songs.

Music has been such a gigantic part of my life, it’s overwhelming to hear how my songs affect people.

 

I’ve had lots of fans tell me the songs got them through a situation or they can’t stop listening to it because it strikes a chord with them.

 

I’ve had people tell me they’ve cried listening to some of my songs or performances. They FEEL something, which is all I’ve ever wanted to do – help someone feel something.

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Tell us about your working experience with producers and music directors.

I’m all about collaboration so I love working with producers and directors.

 

I love hearing the creative input of other people. It’s invigorating to me and I love it when I start with one idea and it transforms into something bigger and better.

 

Robyn Stockdale, who has done a lot of my album artwork, is a great example of this. I will give her the seed and she will make it bloom into a whole garden. That kind of collaboration is amazing.

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Tell us how you feel after the completion of a song.

Proud, but also aware that it’s just the beginning. I feel that songs are like kids. You have them, create them, and then they keep changing – becoming themselves. It’s amazing to see.

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Tell us your worst song and state the reason.

I’m critical of so many of my early songs because to me, now, I feel like they lack direction. I didn’t think them through enough to fine-tune certain aspects.

 

But, incredibly, some of them are STILL my most asked-for songs! So, it’s hard to say they’re bad when people still love them. That’s also why my answer to what makes a good song was so broad. You never know! And different things resonate with different people. As long as you’re being genuine, I think you’re onto something.

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Tell us what you will change in your music.

There is inevitable growth in my music all the time. You can’t help but keep learning new things and interpreting life.

 

I’d like to get more comfortable on guitar to expand what I can do instrumentally, and I think that will change my songwriting, as it has in the past. Every time you learn a new chord, a new instrument, you make another leap. It’s fun when that happens, like the beginning all over again.

 

So, I hope to keep growing and that will change what comes out musically.

 

I also hope to keep expanding my topics. It’s easy to write about yourself at the beginning – it’s what you know best. But it’s fun to expand that and write about books, characters, the world, imaginary situations to express an idea, etc. as you get better at communicating ideas.

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Tell us what is special about this release.

This song was inspired by Anna Kendrick’s Cup Song. Everyone kept asking me to play it and eventually I realized – it’s just words to a beat. I can do that.

 

So, I wrote this song when I was feeling a little mistreated by a potential boyfriend. It was my warning to him. The rest of the song was, again, the brilliance of asking my bandmates to contribute what they felt.

 

I remember Anthony, my guitar player, picking up a beer bottle when we played it at a gig and blowing into it. I freaked out and knew we had to add that to the song in the studio. It’s amazing how those brilliant little ideas come together. You have to trust your team. When you do – everyone gets better and the songs benefit.

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Tell us about your future goals.

I recorded in Nashville last year and I’m hoping that will help bring some new traction to my career.

 

Music is all about networking. I don’t need to be a household name, but I do want to share my music on a bigger level, play more shows to quiet, listening audiences, tour further, etc. I write music to be heard, so I want it to be heard on a greater level.

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Tell us how you overcome obstacles.

Music is one of the most infuriating businesses because there are absolutely no guarantees. There’s no ladder and when you stay long enough or work hard, you don’t just move up. And sometimes you watch people much newer, younger or maybe not as good as you fly beyond you.

 

The only way to overcome all of it is to stick to your belief in yourself and not give up. Every time I feel upset or frustrated, I use it as motivation to get better and work harder. I view every obstacle like it’s gasoline on my fire – not water.

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Elaborate on the song.

I feel like women are taught to tolerate more than they should have to…

 

This song is a declaration to be treated right. It’s also a warning – “don’t stand a chance, I start a fight.” It’s saying not to underestimate me and that I realize, “you’re full of (sh)it, just like everyone else.”

 

I’ve found myself in a lot of situations where the man thinks I won’t catch on to whatever the game is that he’s playing or that even if I do, I won’t call him out on it. Wrong.

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Elaborate on your artist’s name and the title of the album.

The Jess Novak Band was a natural move from a previous band I had that used two last names from the group. I didn’t want people to get confused when I changed the name after that member left, so I kept it as simple as possible.

 

The name of the album, “Fireworks & Fairytales” is two of the song titles put together. The two songs speak directly to one another, so I thought it was a cool way to draw attention to both. I also loved the imagery that came with that and the wings on the cover demonstrate that fairytale aspect.

 

Jamie LeRose - Princess Cray

Jamie LeRose – Princess Cray

 

Jamie LeRose - Princess Cray

Jamie LeRose – Princess Cray

 

ARTIST NAME:  Jamie LeRose

 

SONG TITLE:  Princess Cray

 

ALBUM TITLE: Princess Cray

 

RELEASE DATE: November 18th, 2019

 

GENRE: Pop

 

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Jamie LeRose is an up and coming female pop singer on a rise to the top with her powerful, stylistic vocals, charismatic performance, and inspiring life story.

 

Massively influenced by Lady Gaga, the now 19-year-old singer began performing when she was just three years of age. Often being teased by the other kids for her love of music, Jamie has continued to persevere in her goals to become a famous singer.

 

From a crowd of 100, Jamie has worked her way up to performing in front of 30,000 people, at NJ Pride Fest 2019.

 

Now working with some of the biggest names in the industry, gaining a large following on “Tik Tok”, and following the release of her debut single ‘Fame’, Jamie LeRose is a name the world is going to be seeing a lot more of very soon.

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Tell us how to refine a demo to a mastered song.

Mixing is key. By mixing the vocals and track, you can take a demo and make it finished sounding. Take a step away, then come back and re-listen. Don’t say something is finished after your first time mixing it. Listen to it on different types of speakers.

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Discuss the processing involved in creating a song.

There is not just one way to write a song. Everyone has a different process.

 

For me, I come up with a topic/title and I write it down. I then see a visual art that goes with it.

 

For instance, my song “Simon Says”. I saw a visual of a girl, dressed as a puppet, being controlled by strings. The strings represented society controlling people. I then put the visual with the title and my song “Simon Says” became about people doing what Simon says (society being Simon) to fit in and wanting to rebel.

 

I then work with a producer on making a track that fits the visual art of the song and I wrote a melody over it.

 

 

For the lyric, I write down ideas, that fit the song and form them into lyrics.

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Elaborate on the themes of most of your songs.

I don’t like songs that are so “literal”. I try to make songs that are so different; they’re intriguing. All my songs’ titles are weird and stand out, make you want to listen to figure out their meaning. They all have performance in them from theatrical tracks to grand melodies.

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Tell us your greatest musical works up to date.

My song “Princess Cray” has all the qualities of a great song. I’m proud of its captivating lyrics, catchy melody, danceable beat, theatrical yet current track, and powerful vocals. I have only released three songs, but have many songs coming out very soon.

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Tell us those behind your music process.

I am the largest part of my music process, but I don’t do it all alone. I come up the song idea, title, lyrics, melody, and track vibe.

 

My producer, “Richard Keller” mixes and produces my songs. I’ve worked with some other producers in the past, but Richard is my main guy!

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Tell us how you are handling the promotion of your music.

After joining an app called “Tik Tok”, I gained 360k followers and 10 million likes in 3 months. I promote my music in Tik Tok videos on my page.

 

Also, I hold competitions where my fans have to watch, like, and comment on my music videos to win a follower or facetime. My Tik Tok is my main source of promotion. Just recently I had wild posting done around Manhattan as well.

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Tell us your future goals and how you aim to accomplish.

Since I was a little girl, I’ve dreamed of being a pop star. My big goal is to get a record deal and get my first number one song. I will accomplish that by growing my numbers online and writing songs every day.

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Tell us what you think has changed in the music industry.

The music has changed. The music today lacks, feeling, art, real vocals, and emotion. Everything is about the same topic, just something to dance to, or is filthy. People are just putting out songs to make money and fans.

 

Artists should be putting out music that makes them feel something, makes the audience feel something, but that’s so rare now. Real instruments are barely used in music as well! It’s crazy.

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Tell the greatest mistake to avoid while making a song.

Never write a song with the goal of it being a hit. Just write.

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Tell us how you boost your performance.

I boost my performance by having confidence. When I step on a stage, I flaunt confidence.

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Explain the structure of the song.

There is no set structure to a song, but the most common is two verses, two pre-chorus, a bridge, and three choruses. The chore structure of a song is the melody.

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Discuss the relevance of instruments to a song.

Instruments behind a song can change the whole feel of a song, they make the feel of the song complete.

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State your musical skills.

I am a singer, songwriter, and producer.

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Tell if you consider acting in a movie.

Acting has always been a big part of my life. I incorporate acting into all my songs and performances. I would love to one day act in a movie, a leading role of course.;)

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Tell us how you eliminate noise in your recordings.

You make sure it is very quiet in the studio. Then, if there’s a noise behind your main vocals, you hit “Noise Removal.”

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List the name of artists you cherish most.

Since I was 7 years old, Lady Gaga has been my most cherished artist, my idol. I also love Ariana Grande, Miley Cyrus, and Melanie Martinez.

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Tell us how you get inspiration.

I’m very inspired by anything weird and different. I just dig deep into my mind and think of the most different thing I can write about.

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Elaborate on the song.

I was lost, as an artist, for a while. One day, I excepted who I was. I couldn’t just write a song, there had to be a character, a performance, a story. So, I came up with the idea of a crazy, yet hot character, and I wanted to tell her story through music. The first part of her story was her knowing she’s crazy and expecting it. That’s how “Princess Cray” was born.

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Elaborate on your artist’s name and the title of the album.

My artist name is my birth name. I always love my name. The title of my album describes the character who’s a story I’m telling in every song.