Bard Edrington V - Espadín

Bard Edrington V – Espadín

Espadín by Bard Edrington V and The Palm in The Cypress

 

 

 

 

 

Bard Edrington V - Espadín

Bard Edrington V – Espadín

 

 

 

 

 

ARTIST NAME:  Bard Edrington V

 

SONG TITLE:  Take Three Breaths

 

ALBUM TITLE: Espadín

 

RELEASE DATE: April 29, 2019

 

GENRE:  Americana

 

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Anghami

 

The journey begins in Tennessee, where Bard was raised.  Returning home to the south for three years, he digs deep into the music that influenced him there, Appalachian Mountain music (Rendezvous Duel, Southern Belle) and Delta Blues (Spread my Wings, Riverside Blues, and Mississippi Flows).

 

He takes those influences to Mexico where he lived with his family for a year, playing music with his wife to earn a living.

 

The culture of Mexico, from stories of the simple farming lifestyle of the Mezcaleros to the exuberant emotions of Mariachi horns, soak into “Gold and Black Mare” and “Take Three Breaths”, while “Mango Tree” simply rejoices in Mexico’s succulent tropical climate.

 

“Take Three Breaths” carries the listener on a journey south down the Camino Real.

 

Bard leaves Santa Fe to move his family to a small fishing village in the state of Nayarit.  The travelers dive across the border to get sideswiped in Sonora, pay bribes in Mazatlan, and pass a 40’ tall Virgin Mary in Sinaloa.

 

The anchor of the album, Espadín, takes place deep in the heart of Oaxaca.  There, you can smell the smoke from the wild agave piñas as they cook in the ground.  The traditional transformation of wild agave into distilled mezcal is told in the title song “Espadín.”  Follow the Mescalero to his hidden spot “where the espadín grow wild for twenty years or more.” The anchor of the album is found in this song when Karina Wilson’s solo quartet emerges “like sweet water from under the mountain”. Boris McCutcheon’s coaxing of melodies out of the mandolin takes the listener deep into the arroyo.

 

Bard returns to New Mexico, his heart home, to tell the stories of other travelers who tried to bridge the worlds of “back home” and the new frontier in “Painted Pony”, “Gold and Black Mare”, and “Rendezvous Duel”.

 

In “Rendezvous Duel” the narrator, Kit Carson, comes back to visit his wife and sits down to tell her all his stories and then asks to hear hers.

 

“Maidenhair” comes out from deep in Slickhorn canyon along the San Juan River in Utah, where canyon wrens sing the song of falling rocks and maidenhair ferns’ green, silky leaves spill out of cracks in the earth.

This is the life once explored by pioneering people of the 19th century, deep, slow travel where worlds met and cultures integrated.

 

Bard keeps this pioneering spirit alive and documents it in sound.

 

In Espadín, we travel to new lands and experience new possibilities through the eyes and inspiration of this sincere and enormously creative artist.

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Explain how to overcome writer’s block. 

A simple answer is to seek out inspiration.  But sometimes the inspiration is there but the words are not.  My technique is to find a melody or chord progression that evokes an emotion, and then continue to play it, sometimes days, until it pulls the lyrics out of me.  Usually, the inspiration comes quickly.

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Tell us the tricks behind making a hit song.  

The truth – If you are true to what you believe, then it’s a hit.  It might not get a million YouTube views or whatever is deemed a “hit” these days, but it can be a hit in the eyes of the writer – And, making the song easy on the ears and easy to jump right in and follow.

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Tell us how you get feedback for your demo before working on it.

I record all of my demos on the GarageBand app on my iPhone.

 

When I’m starting to write a new song I might have three versions of it recorded on my phone and spend a couple of days listening to them as I drive around.

 

I like to get the song in my head so that I can continue to work on it even when I’m not around my instrument.

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Explain your recording experience in the studio.

It differs.  On “Espadín” I tracked multiple songs with just myself and the drummer in the room. We set it up so that there was some bleed, to give the live feel.  Recording with just the drummer is nice because I don’t have to think about what the fiddle player or bass player are doing.

 

I just lock in on the rhythm and do my part.  It gives me more space to focus on my vocals and guitar parts.

 

“Take Three Breaths” was recorded like this.  Then we added all the other tracks to the original live recording.

 

I go into the studio with a template of an idea for a song and then sometimes that gets thrown out the window.

 

I let the other musicians do what they are good at – If they are inspired by the music than it comes out naturally.

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Tell us how you compose.

By feel – Nothing ever gets written down.  My songs do the composing for me.

 

When I write a new song it’s very evident what the instrumentation will be on it.  The hard part is not adding too much.

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Tell us if you add effects to your vocals to sound better.

Sure, reverb and echo – Kind of the standard.

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Tell us your opinion on music education.

I wish I had some.  Sometimes I hear musicians who went to music school are amazing players and composers, but they have no soul to their music and no grit.

 

And then I hear educated musicians who have it all and have blended the soul into their ability to play whatever note they want.

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Tell us how you relate with other artists.

I keep competition amongst other artists out of the picture.

 

I want to connect with them on a musical level and share inspiration and techniques.

 

I play with a lot of musicians here in Santa Fe, NM.  I like to mix up my band so that nothing gets stagnant.

 

I want fans to not know what to expect when coming to see me live.

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Tell us if you can collaborate with an artist of a different genre.

Absolutely – That’s what’s great about music.  It’s a language with lots of different dialects.  But sometimes you don’t have to know the dialect to be able to communicate.

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Explain how to finance a music project.

Work my ass off in my day job.  I don’t do crowdfunding. I’m not into asking people to donate money to me so that I can make an album.  I’ll ask you to buy it and support me that way.

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Tell us how to generate income from a musical work.

I wish I knew.  Right now I just play gigs and record and encourage people to come to shows and support me.

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Explain the process involved in recording a vocal.

Some songs are easier to sing than others and I can nail it the first take.  Other songs, depending on how it’s recorded, we will do a few vocal takes.

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Elaborate on the song.

“Take Three Breaths”

 

In 2016 my family and I moved to a small fishing village in Chacala, Mexico.  We lived and worked there and our sons were in a local school.  It was an amazing cultural experience for us all.

 

When we moved there, a friend and I drove down the 1,500 miles from New Mexico.  Along the way, we had many experiences.

 

We got sideswiped just across the border in Sonora, paid a bribe to a cop in Mazatlan and then once we arrived in Chacala we hit the tequila and wrote ‘Take Three Breaths.’

 

This is the most produced song on the album.  The production of the music was such that I wanted to capture the dramatic chaos feeling we had during the trip.

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Elaborate on your artist name and the title of the album.

Bard Edrington V is a family name.  Bard means a poet and a keeper of stories.  The music I make is based around the meaning of the Bard.

 

Espadín is a type of agave that is native to Mexico and is used in the process of making Mezcal.

 

Mobile Version

Mercy John - Don't Leave Me Now

Mercy John – Don’t Leave Me Now

Mercy John – Don’t Leave Me Now

 

 

 

 

 

Mercy John - Don't Leave Me Now

Mercy John – Don’t Leave Me Now

 

 

 

 

Mercy John – Don’t Leave Me Now

 

As with many musicians, Mercy John’s music has been heavily influenced by the place in which he grew up. Both his childhood experiences and his countryside roots have made him the person he is today. Unsurprisingly, there are local flavours that can be identified within the body of his work. However, despite his Dutch roots, many of Mercy John’s songs also contain elements that are reminiscent of the works of Tom Petty, Bruce Springsteen, and Ryan Adams. So how is it that the music of Mercy John has been influenced by these big names?

 

In addition to writing lyrics in his hometown on the outskirts of a small village, Mercy John has spent some time writing songs in Nashville, Tennessee. ‘Maybe the place where I grew up is good soil for Dutch Americana’, says John, born on the day that The Netherlands was hit by the toughest blizzard in the history of the country. Having been raised in the middle of the Dutch no-man’s-land, he gives a glimpse of his formative years: ‘my entire childhood I watched out over the fields and played in the woods nearby. I was raised, rather protected, far from the big world outside. With a lot of time and space to play music, by the age of twelve, I was already rehearsing with a band in one of the barns on our property.’

 

The remote and protected environment of Mercy John’s childhood experiences instilled within him a sense of wanderlust – a dream of engaging with the unknown and unfamiliar, a yearning for adventure in the world beyond his immediate horizon. Yet now that he is older, he has come to realize that home is where the heart is, and that the world is perhaps too complex to ever fully comprehend.

 

On his new album ‘This Ain’t New York’, released by Butler Records in February 2017, Mercy John describes his world of fears, sadness, happiness, and love. Mercy John recorded the album with his band and producer Gabriël Peeters in Uncle Gabe’s Sound Studio. In the first week after the album was released ‘This Ain’t New York’ has collected some really great reviews and was selected as CD Of The Week on Dutch national radio NPO Radio 1.

 

His first album, Five More Days & A Matter of Somewhere (released as John Henry) received positive reviews and was applauded by critics within the genre. Willem Jongeneelen (BN De stem, OOR) called it ‘A heck of an Americana album from Dutch soil’. Following the release of this album, Mercy John played several venues across The Netherlands. Highlights from the album were aired on Radio 1, Radio 2 and 3FM.

 

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Natalie Jean and Levi Moore

 

ARTIST NAME: Natalie Jean and Levi Moore

SONG TITLE: The Letting Go

ALBUM TITLE: The Letting Go

RELEASE DATE: February 14th, 2018

GENRE: Country/Americana

 

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Natalie Jean is an award winning, multi-nominated singer/ songwriter performer. She is also a Voting Member in the Recording Academy (GRAMMYS). Natalie Jean is a versatile performer and singer. She sings many genres, such as Jazz Pop, R&B, Blues, and Dance. She can also sing in French, Spanish, English, and Creole. Natalie Jean is mostly influenced by artist such as Lena Horne, Celine Dion, Billie Holiday, Nina Simone, and Ella Fitzgerald. She has performed at many venues in the MD/DC. She also has performed in LA, New York, Nashville, and North Carolina. She also appeared on WPFW, a Jazz station in Washington DC. She has been nominated over 60 times for her music and has won many awards. Most recently, Natalie Jean was the Gold Medal Winner in the 2017 Global Music Awards for Female Pop Vocalist for her song “L’Amour a L’Infini. In the 2017 American Songwriting Awards, her song “Red Room-The Remix” won in the Dance category. World Artist of The Year (Multiple Languages) winner in the 2017 Josie Music Awards, Bronze Medal Winner for her World Album “Haiti Mwen Renmenw”in the 2017 Gobal Music Awards, and Best World Song “La Pe” – in the Clouzine International Music Awards. Also, her song “Red Room – The Remix and Se Kanaval are a finalist in the 2017 UK Songwriting Contest. Her song Lan Nuit No Tounin Lougarou is a Semi-Finalist in the 2017 UK Songwriting Contest. Most recently, her song “Smoking Ke Fan” was a finalist in the 2018 International Acoustic Music Awards, “The Letting Go” nominated in the 2018 Atlas Elite Entertainment Music Awards for best country song, and “The Letting Go” Best Americana Song in the 2018 Clouzine International Music Award, and a Silver Medal in The Global Music Awards for Country Song. She was also nominated in the 2017 OWMR Music Awards for Best World/Global Fusion Album and People’s Choice.  She has released five albums thus far. The first released in 2013 a pop/jazz album, called “Obsession,” second released in 2014, a Jazz album called “Natalie Jean,” and a French Pop/Dance album called “Lecons D’Amour,” released in 2015. Her 4th album “Unafraid,” was released on July 8th, 2016. Her new album “Haiti Mwen Renmenw” was released on July 14th, 2017.

 

 

Tell us your view on old and new school music in terms of preference.

I love old school music better. I like artists like Nina Simone and Janis Joplin. I believe that the old school music was more about how it made the audience feel, than trying to be the biggest star. I find that with today’s music, artists are trying to be more of stars, than creating music that will actually make the audience feel. I create music so that the audience can relate to something. I create so that there is a deeper understanding and so that someone’s soul can be moved.
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Tell us your most memorable day as an artist.

My most memorable day as an artist would be performing at the Schermerhorn Symphony Center in Nashville, TN for the 2016 Josie Music Awards. I was able to perform my French song “Mon Ange” (which is one of my favorites to perform). I also won two awards that night, which made it an even greater night.

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Share your press release and review.

Natalie Jean is a very rare kind of vocalist.  Winning recognition across the most diverse of musical genres and quite comfortable performing in English, French and Creole. Levi Moore is an upcoming talented Country artist.  In exciting news, Natalie Jean and Levi Moore have recently dropped their new single “The Letting Go,” and fans old and new couldn’t be happier.

 

February 14, 2018

Natalie Jean and Levi Moore are excited to announce the much-anticipated release of their Country single, titled, ‘The Letting Go.’ The song is a co-write between Michael Peloso and Natalie Jean.

Produced by Alexi Von Guggenberg, is readily available for purchase nationwide at the iTunes Store, Amazon.com, Google Play, and various digital online stores.

 

“Music aside for a second, the songwriting is where things get personal – where things connect in a more intimate and communicable sort of way. Natalie Jean’s smooth and gentle voice offers up the first verse – a certain delicacy that contrasts effectively with the thick drum line and the somewhat manic or anticipating guitar part. Her voice falls into the mix like another instrument, brightening things up, enhancing the ambiance. It’s only really when you get to the satisfying resolve of the hook that the lyrics really start to take shape in your mind. The second and third times you listen you pick up on way more about the sentiment and the underlying ideas. It’s an inspiring song, learning to move forwards is important – to get over and get on with things. The song hits with impact, it’s powerful, and this concept is well represented.”

 

“The set-up of one voice for the first verse and another for the second is not all that common in modern music. It works best when there’s a noticeable contrast, a clear cut set of differences that lay out the two leading characters and their sides of the story or their input. Levi Moore’s voice adds a gorgeous new dynamic to an already enjoyable and calming piece of music and writing. The two artists together offer so much passion and skill that their performances are mesmerising. The detail throughout this entire release is beautiful; it’s a carefully crafted single that has been so well captured that you can listen on repeat and not get tired of the unfolding mightiness and magic.”

– Stereo Stickman

 

“The song binds a beautiful tale of unforgettable love and the strength it bores into the mind and soul of a human body. This track flows over a logical explanation of feelings and relationship which is sure to inspire many young hearts. The audio quality of the song is quite high with keen attention given to making the song enjoyable for the audience.”

 

“Brilliantly penned down by Michael Peloso and Natalie Jean, this track, ‘The Letting Go’ is truly a masterpiece by Natalie Jean and Levi Moore. With so much talent and passion merging on a single platform, this track is already a memorandum in the world of amusing harmony.”

– Skope Magazine – Natalie Parker

 

Natalie Jean is an award winning singer/songwriter performer and a dynamic artist who grew up loving music.  She enjoyed singing with her Haitian father, Guy Robert Jean – who was also an artist. She writes for many genres, which would include Jazz, R&B, Dance, Pop, Country, Rap, Heavy Metal, Contemporary, etc. She can also sing in French and Spanish.

From 2014-2018, Natalie Jean’s songs have received over 60 nominations and several wins, including the American Tracks Music Awards,  Artists in Music Awards, LA Music Awards, The Indie Music Channel Awards, The Indees, American Songwriting Awards, Hollywood Music and Media Awards, The International Music and Entertainment Association, Australian Independent Music Awards, the Akademia Music Awards Josie Music Awards, International Music Video Underground, International Songwriting Competition, Australian Songwriting Contest, Global Music Awards, Libera Music Awards, Wammies, World Wide Music Contest, Hollywood Songwriting Contest, and UK Songwriting Contest.  She was named one of the Top Five Vocalists in the Singer Universe Vocalist of the Month for June 2014. Most recently she was awarded the Gold Medal in the Global Music Awards for Female Pop Vocalist, for one of the songs currently on the album, titled “L’Amour a L’Infini, which is a co-write with Lyssabelle. Also, she won Best Dance Song, in the American Songwriting Awards for her song, “Red Room – The Remix”. She also won Best World Artist (Multiple Languages) in the 2017 Josie Music Awards. As well as being a Finalist in the 2018 International Acoustic Music Awards in the Folk Category for her song “Smoking Ke Fan,” which was written by Natalie and her father.

 

Inspired by Lena Horne, Celine Dion, Billie Holiday, Nina Simone,  and Ella Fitzgerald, her beautiful voice and melodies will surely leave you wanting for more!

 

 

 

Levi Moore, is a country singer/songwriter out of Savannah, GA. He writes what he feels and sings from the heart; influenced early on by the great songwriters of lore, like Gordon Lightfoot and Jim Croce.

While having always craved the presence of music, he began creating music late, teaching himself to play guitar in the second half of my five-year college career, using music as a balance between football practice and midterm exams. Having been a storyteller and writer since elementary school, songwriting was a natural progression.

 

After 3 years, he left the oilfield to become a full-time musician, moving to Savannah, GA and plunging headlong into the coastal fray. After having been nominated for Male Vocalist of The Year in Modern Country at the 2017 Josie Music Awards, He is diligently working, gigging throughout the week, writing more than ever, and preparing to cut and release the first album this winter.

 

Michael Peloso is a New Jersey-based lyricist/songwriter who writes undeniably touching, honest lyrics with a sense of simplicity that are uniquely all his own. Other primary influences include Tom Waits, Bruce Springsteen, Fleetwood Mac, Tom Petty, Carole King, James Taylor, Natalie Merchant, Hall & Oates, Jude Cole, Ed Roland and Darius Rucker…Just to name a few of many. Michael collaborated with Natalie Jean. “Please Don’t”, a Josie Award nominated R&B track was released in 2016, and is a featured single on Natalie’s “Unafraid” album. The duo released “Alive” on June 30, 2017. “Lost & Found” is scheduled to be released this fall.
Most recently, “The Letting Go” won for best Americana Song in the Clouzine International Music Awards and is nominated in the Atlas Elite Entertainment Music Awards for Best Country Single.

 

 

Be sure to check their live in upcoming shows near you.

 

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Website

 

 

Levi Moore

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Michael Peloso

Website

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Tell us how you protect your singing voice.

I try to drink a lot of water and tea. I am also an aerobics instructor. So, I try to keep warm as much as possible.

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Tell us the major reason you are into music.

I come from a musical family. My father, Guy R. Jean, is a famous Haitian singer. My aunt Sandra Jean was part of the first all-female band in Haiti, called Riske. Growing up, I knew I wanted to do something with music. The main reason I am in music, is I like the way it makes other people feel. I like the fact that I am able to make a difference in someone else’s life.

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Discuss creativity and originality in music.

I think that in the current music industry, one must be creative, original, and versatile. It is not enough to want to be like an artist that you admire. You must bring something new to the plate. I love original music. I love the fact that someone has taken the time to create something out of the box and/or something that is real. I am not a fan of over produced material. I like it raw and natural. In order to stick out in this music business, you have to be original and show them something that has not been done before.

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Tell us your plans pertaining music.

I plan on promoting my latest the single “The Letting Go” with Levi Moore. I have performed on a couple of other artists’ albums. So, I will be helping to promote those. I am gigging. Hoping to release some more singles.

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Tell us the secret of success.

I believe the secret to success is to be true to who you are as an artist. I think that is extremely important. One big important lesson to remember is that music is subjective. One group may like a song, and another may not. The goal is to believe in yourself and go with your gut. Don’t let anyone try to change you.

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Tell us how you become a musician.

I was going through some personal experiences, while living in NYC, and it prompted me to write poetry. It prompted me to start writing songs about my experiences. I sent a demo out to a couple of places. Tate Music Publishing contacted me and they helped me with my first CD, “Obsession”. Working with Tate didn’t pan out, so I started researching on how to submit music on the internet and was able to make a lot of progress with my music.

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Tell us what makes you happy and sad on this project.

I was happy about being able to work with my co-writer Michael Peloso. He is an amazing lyricist. I was also happy to be working with the amazing Levi Moore. He is an up and coming Country artist. The sad part about working on a project is all of the promoting that you have to do. It is a lot of work. I find that the Country/Americana genre is a hard one to tackle. Country has changed in regards to its sound over the decades. So, it was interesting to see where the song was being placed.

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Tell us your point of view on rape and sexual harassment, and how to eradicate it.

Wow. I think both men and women need to be strong. Sexual harassment is something that I believe everyone goes through. I think that we should not tolerate it and if it happens, it definitely should be reported. Rape is about power and taking away power from the victim. I think that we should all be careful in situations that we put ourselves in and we should report the rape immediately when it happens.

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List the people that assisted in making this song.

Michael Peloso is the co-writer, Levi Moore is my duet partner, and Alexi Vom Guggenberg is my music producer.

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Tell us how you get financial support to run your music career.

I do everything myself. I work two jobs. Last year, I was able to get a Grant from Maryland State Arts Council, which really helped a lot.

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Tell us the genre of your music and the reason you went for this genre.

I actually do many genres. From Pop, Dance, World, R&B, Contemporary, Blues, Jazz, etc… I decided to go for Country, because it best suited what I wanted to accomplish with the duet. Also, because I wanted to go for a genre that was best suited for Levi Moore.

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Tell us if you prefer to write your own songs or you prefer to write with professional songwriters.

I do prefer to write my own songs. There is something really intimate about writing your own experiences on paper.

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Tell us if you prefer to produce your songs or you prefer to work with reputable producers.

Alexi Von Guggenberg has produced my last four albums. He is awesome. So, I would prefer to work with reputable producers.

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Tell us the story behind this song.

I wanted to do a duet. So, I contacted Michel Pelsoso and asked if we could write a song together. Then, I proceeded to ask Levi Moore, if he would sing it with me. The song is basically about letting go of the past and be able to move toward the future.

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Tell us your favourite brand of microphone.

My favorite brand of microphone to use would be the Sennheiser. It brings out the best sound for my voice.

Natalie Jean

 

Natalie Jean is an award winning, multi-nominated singer/ songwriter performer. She is also a Voting Member in the Recording Academy (GRAMMYS). Natalie Jean is a versatile performer and singer. She sings many genres, such as Jazz Pop, R&B, Blues, and Dance. She can also sing in French, Spanish, English, and Creole. Natalie Jean is mostly influenced by artist such as Lena Horne, Celine Dion, Billie Holiday, Nina Simone, and Ella Fitzgerald. She has performed at many venues in the MD/DC. She also has performed in LA, New York, Nashville, and North Carolina. She also appeared on WPFW, a Jazz station in Washington DC. She has been nominated over 60 times for her music and has won many awards. Most recently, Natalie Jean was the Gold Medal Winner in the 2017 Global Music Awards for Female Pop Vocalist for her song “L’Amour a L’Infini. In the 2017 American Songwriting Awards, her song “Red Room-The Remix” won in the Dance category. World Artist of The Year (Multiple Languages) winner in the 2017 Josie Music Awards, Bronze Medal Winner for her World Album “Haiti Mwen Renmenw”in the 2017 Gobal Music Awards, and Best World Song “La Pe” – in the Clouzine International Music Awards. Also, her song “Red Room – The Remix and Se Kanaval are a finalist in the 2017 UK Songwriting Contest. Her song Lan Nuit No Tounin Lougarou is a Semi-Finalist in the 2017 UK Songwriting Contest. Most recently, her song “Smoking Ke Fan” was a finalist in the 2018 International Acoustic Music Awards, “The Letting Go” nominated in the 2018 Atlas Elite Entertainment Music Awards for best country song, and “The Letting Go” Best Americana Song in the 2018 Clouzine International Music Award. Also she is nominated in the 2017 OWMR Music Awards for Best World/Global Fusion Album and People’s Choice.  She has released five albums thus far. The first released in 2013 a pop/jazz album, called “Obsession,” second released in 2014, a Jazz album called “Natalie Jean,” and a French Pop/Dance album called “Lecons D’Amour,” released in 2015. Her 4th album “Unafraid,” was released on July 8th, 2016. Her new album “Haiti Mwen Renmenw” was released on July 14th, 2017.

 

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YouTube

Judy Blank

 

State your reason for choosing music as a career.

I’ve always had an interest in people who were brave enough to pursue unusual careers. Acrobats, dancers, actors, singers; I never knew exactly what I wanted to be as a kid, but I was pretty certain I wasn’t going to be sitting behind a desk from 9-5. When I started writing my first songs and playing around town for a little bit, I soon realized I was doing something truly special: addressing people’s feelings, meeting talented & interesting people, and exploring the world all at the same time. To me, that’s a dream job. Also, with a career in music, you’re never done learning! There’s no ultimate goal for me. I just want to keep improving myself while I try to enjoy every second of the journey.

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Tell us how you write the lyrics to your song.

Sometimes good song lines accidentally find me. I can be watching a b-movie on Netflix when one of the characters says something that keeps ringing in my head. A funny line, a quote, just a pretty way of saying something, or a saying I’ve never heard anyone use for. I write it down in my phone or in a notebook and usually have an idea for some kind of melody for it. I obviously pause Netflix and start humming the melody, while trying to fit in the syllables of the line I like. Then, I let it sit for a few days and the rest of the song kind of evolves around that first, main idea that usually turns out to be the chorus. But I do scribble down a LOT of different rhymes before I’m finally happy, haha.

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Tell us about your life outside the music world.

I live in Utrecht, a charming little city in the Netherlands. There are many cool coffee places I like to go to. My favorite one is Blackbird coffee & vintage, a 70’s-inspired place on the canal with the sweetest owners in the world. You can find me there on the regular catching up with my friends. Utrecht is a lovely city to come home to when I’m not traveling. I really like skiing and snowboarding. There’s something about the crisp mountain air that makes me feel brand new every time I go. Oh, I’m also a songwriting teacher at a young artist academy called Herman Brood Academie. And believe it or not; I’m in the hip hop department!

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Brief us about your music career.

When I was 14, I believed I was a cool skater girl and started singing in a band called ‘Boobytrap’ with friends from school. We covered Green Day and Red Hot Chili Peppers songs. We were so cool. Gnarly. But nobody knew I was actually taking piano classes and writing sad sorry songs about my miserable teenage life. I started writing more regularly and playing more shows as I grew up, and when my debut album came about in the Summer of 2014, I had the pleasure of playing at some of the biggest festivals in the Netherlands with my band at the time. All of a sudden we were playing North Sea Jazz festival, Lowlands fest and Pinkpop. In the fall that followed, I did my first club tour, played a lot of radio & TV shows and supported artists like Macy Gray & Maria Mena. But as the album momentum slowly died, I ended up in a bit of an identity crisis. I had no idea who I was and definitely no clue of what I wanted my songs to sound like anymore. I didn’t feel connected to the songs on the album anymore, and nothing came out of my hands when I wanted to write something. And most of all, I didn’t feel like playing the piano when I didn’t need to. I was ready to give up on pursuing a career in music in general when I started traveling. I ended up in Lake Charles, Louisiana, where I picked up a guitar and started playing every day. My inspiration slowly came back; I started writing simpler folk based songs, and tried them out at open mics around town. When I came home after that trip, I never touched the piano again. A year later I supported my favorite band of all time, the Wood Brothers in a sold out LantarenVenster in Rotterdam. I met up with the lead singer, Oliver Wood, in Nashville, where I was just being a total tourist, a few months later. He showed me the studio where they had recorded some of their albums: Zac Brown’s Southern Ground. I immediately fell in love with the place. I went back to record my next album there exactly one year later. And now the first single is out and I’m currently trying out all my new songs on while being on the road with Scottish singer-songwriter Daniel Docherty. Life’s cool.

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Elaborate on how you come about your artist’s name.

I think my parents thought it was a cool name; they gave it to me when I was born.

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List your five favourite music videos with reasons.

Johnny Cash – Hurt. It’s just gorgeous, so real, and so human. Johnny Cash is my hero.

 

 

Matt Maltese – As The World Caves In. It’s a surreal video that feels 100% real to me. Way to go.

 

 

Nick Mulvey – Cucurucu. I can just look at this forever. Thank God for slo-mo.

 

 

Ben Howard – Keep Your Head Up. This made me wanna be IN the video. Vibin’!

 

 

Justin Timberlake – Say Something. I couldn’t keep my eyes off the screen while watching this.

 

 

It’s just so great. And when the choir comes in… chills. All in one take. Who does that?!

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Tell us your source of inspiration.

Traveling. Nashville. People. Heartbreak. Aggravation. Netflix. More heartbreak.

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Tell us your impression on dealing with paparazzi.

I love pizza paparazzi. It’s the best.

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Elaborate on the A-Z process of this song.

The first line of the song, ‘How many times do I need to fix myself?’ had been stuck in my head for a few weeks. Then one day, I was driving in my car, singing, the rest of the verse and half a chorus came out. I was on my way to a friend’s house for a social visit and I remember just not being able to get that melody out of my mind. I picked up a guitar and started writing at the kitchen table on a Friday night, with all my other friends in the room, getting drunk. I ended up going to the attic to record a Garageband demo of the song on my iPhone; I was already hearing some backing vocals in my head so I just had to lay them down. I had almost everything done, except for the lyrics to the bridge part. When I flew back to Nashville a few weeks later to record the second half of my new album, I remember being a little frustrated because I hadn’t been able to come up with that teeny tiny bit of text. I was really amazed by the stuff bassist Joe Dickey, drummer Andrew Peebles and guitarist Ethan Ballinger laid down in the first place. But then I started tweaking the lyrics with a little help from my producer Chris Taylor. Some of the things he said and the pictures he saw that he described just got my inspiration mojo going again. I remember him saying something about driving to the west coast, and then the ‘’I’ll be riding shotgun’’- part came to me. The bridge part wasn’t finished until an hour before I recorded the vocal track for that song. Isn’t that crazy?

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Tell us what you have on the way for your fans.

Well, my fans are in for a treat. My second studio album will be out in September this year, and before that, there will be a few singles out on Spotify for them to binge on. I’ve never been more proud of anything I did or made, so I’m super excited to share it. I’ve never been more honest and more personal in my songwriting, either. In a way, that’s kind of freaky, but I do believe being honest has improved the songs in many ways.

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List the names of those that have supported you so far.

Over the past few years, I’ve gotten some sweet words from a lot of people! I don’t remember all of them and I don’t want to put them on the spot, but there’s one really special thing blues grandpa Seasick Steve said about me during his show at North Sea Jazz festival that still rings with me today:

“This young girl sang some songs that made my heart drum. If she was anywhere around me, I’d go see her every night.’’

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Tell us your opinion on the use of auto-tune.

This puts me in an awkward position, since I’m teaching at a hip-hop academy. I’m not supposed to say this, but… I hate it. Hate it. There’s nothing about auto-tune that affects the way I listen to music in a positive way. In my opinion, it takes out the life of a voice. Ugh. Sorry pupils! (I think they’ve always known how I truly felt, anyway).

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Tell us your opinion on quality and quantity in terms of releasing songs.

I haven’t released anything new in four years, simply because I wasn’t happy with what I was making and not sure what I wanted to sound like at all. If I would have released songs in the meantime, they wouldn’t have been near as good as they are now. I’m glad I waited and can now show the growth between the two albums. But I won’t deny I had to totally rebuild my momentum again. There’s something to say for both ways of doing it, I guess.

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Tell us your opinion on comparing music career to non-music career.

The other day, I went to a nail salon I go to, to get my one fake nail done for guitar strumming (it’s like having a plectrum attached to your index finger. Try it if you’ve never done it, it’s heavenly). The lady who was fixing my nail started questioning me about my music career. Many people do. While buffing my nail like a crazy person, right after she had heard me out completely about all the things I had done so far, she asked me this: ‘’But I can’t imagine you making a living out of that, right? Isn’t it all just for fun?’’ It killed my vibe. So bad. I felt so aggravated when I left that place. What on earth gave this lady the right to even talk to me like that? After everything I just told her about all the effort and dedication I put into my music career? Even the shiny new nail couldn’t cheer me up. But as I was biking home, I realized something vital. People who are not pursuing a career in music will simply never truly understand it. And that’s as much a curse as it is a blessing.

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Tell us your opinion on categorizing music into genres and sub-genres.

I think I would like to start a new genre called ‘great songs’. It would definitely make things a lot easier. But seriously; I’m a Dutch girl singing Americana songs. How would you call that? Dutchicana?

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State the genre you hate most with reason.

Death metal. Screamo. Everything that involves grunting. I just honestly don’t get how that turns people on. For real. Intense forms of audioterrorism.

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List your five favourite movies with reasons.

  1. The Lobster

This movie is so perfectly weird. I watched it in my favorite movie theatre in my hometown and it left me feeling completely awkward. Such a funny concept.

 

 

  1. Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri

Such great acting. Ugh. Too good to be true. The main character is so badass and yet so vulnerable, it just gets me.

 

 

  1. Dumb & Dumber

Cracks me up every time. I watched this movie with my dad a gazillion times as a kid and it never gets old. Jim Carrey is my favorite and he always will be.

 

 

  1. The Shining

Oh, that tension. It just kills me. And I love it. Here’s Johnny!

 

 

  1. The Broken Circle Breakdown

If a movie can leave this happy dog feeling depressed for a week, it’s doing something right. Right? This is the most touching movie I’ve seen in all my life. I wrote a song from the perspective of the main character when I was in my sad sorry state. It’s called “Unbroken” and it will definitely be on the new record.

 

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State the official date of release.

March 2, 2018.

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State the links to your stores and website.

 

Website

 

Instagram

 

Facebook

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State the title of the song and the meaning.

Sweet, Sweet Mary Jane. We’ve all come across her one way or the other. She’s tempting and always dressed in green. You’ve met her.

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State the title of the album and the reason for picking the title.

My life was a big mess when I made my previous album, “When The Storm Hits”. I feel like now, four years later, that storm has died down. I’m now finally ready to greet the “Morning Sun”. It’s still early, I’m still young and there’s a lot I got left to learn about life, but it’s a sun. A morning sun that’s about to rise.