Tarzanaland – Calling 901

Tarzanaland – Calling 901

 

Tarzanaland – Calling 901

Tarzanaland – Calling 901

 

ARTIST NAME:  Tarzanaland

 

SONG TITLE:  Calling 901

 

RELEASE DATE: 2019

 

GENRE: Country

 

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Tarzanaland is an American country duo consisting of vocalist Kelly Kidd (from Houston, TX) and multi-instrumentalist Thomas Gallmeier (from New York, NY).

 

The young band emerged in Los Angeles late 2015 after several years of starting their careers in honky tonks (the Podunk Poets) and on the dance floor (Mot & Krid).

 

Both had met several years before when Kidd had asked Gallmeier to drum in a new project. He agreed and together they went on to sign a songwriting/production deal with Grammy-winning producer Glen Ballard.

 

Kidd is most known for fronting and touring with the traditional country band The Podunk Poets all over the U.S. and making appearances at country music festivals including STAGECOACH.

 

Gallmeier’s unique songwriting/production releases have landed him on several European charts.

 

Combining Kidd’s and Gallmeier’s unique musical experiences, their music has been tagged as a pop-country – transitioning from the traditional country feel to their own hybrid modern sound and lyrical focus about cutting loose, forgiveness, political satire and personal evolution.

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Tell us how to refine a demo to a mastered song.

Get your performances sorted, make sure that everything works together with the way you hear it. Sometimes it helps to have a producer who gives you a different perspective. Get the best mix you can and also the best mastering you can. Most of all; be authentic.

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Discuss the processing involved in creating a song.

One way is to come in with a melody and start building a chord structure that supports that melody. In the meantime, we probably already came up with a lyrical idea that then keeps developing as we go along.

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Elaborate on the theme of most of your songs.

We sing about relationships, civil rights and equality and even environmental issues. Whatever inspires, worries or enrages us at any given moment, might end up in a song.

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Tell us your greatest musical works up to date.

We are proud of our singles, Leave Her Wild and Hold Your Fire.

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Tell us those behind your music process.

We do most work within the band. Sometimes we bring in additional musicians and of course, we do have a full live band.

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Tell us how you are handling the promotion of your music.

Social media is the thing these days. And of course playing live, touring, which we are about to begin.

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Tell us your future goals and how you aim to accomplish.

Touring – We are in rehearsal and will be looking for a booking agent.

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Tell us what you think has changed in the music industry.

Everyone wants you to be successful already. No one is willing to develop an artist anymore.

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Tell the greatest mistake to avoid while making a song.

Write from the heart. There’s no formula for a hit song.

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Tell us how you boost your performance.

Playing live is a great opportunity to connect with the audience. We are performers and feed off each other’s energy and enthusiasm.

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Explain the arrangement of the song.

Calling 901 is a more traditional pop/country song with an intro, verse, pre-chorus, chorus, and bridge.

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Discuss how the instruments come together for a song.

I think this song started on acoustic guitar. Then we developed a drum groove, recorded bass and additional guitars and the added vocals.

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Tell if you consider acting in a movie.

Yes, Kelly, our lead singer has been involved in acting.

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Tell us how you eliminate noise in your recordings.

Digital recording is very quiet, to begin with. Our studio has an isolated ground circuit that helps eliminate unwanted buzzing and noise.

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List the name of artists you cherish most.

The Beatles, Hank Williams, Willie Nelson, Shania Twain.

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Tell us how you get inspiration.

Life offers all the inspiration one could wish for.

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Elaborate on the song.

Calling 901 is about what happens when the love you give isn¹t strong enough to keep someone close – Realizing that one cannot win over a heart that is destined to be someplace else.

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Elaborate on your artist name and the title of the album.

Our studio is in Tarzana, CA. the neighborhood the Tarzan stories were written in. Calling 901 was inspired by calling 911.

 

Mobile Version

Cody Joe Hodges - House of the Rising Sun

Cody Joe Hodges

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Cody Joe Hodges - House of the Rising Sun


Cody Joe Hodges – House of the Rising Sun

 

 

 

 

 

ARTIST NAME: Cody Joe Hodges

 

SONG TITLE:  The House of the Rising Sun

 

RELEASE DATE:  2/11/18

 

GENRE:  Country

 

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Cody Joe Hodges was destined to be a performer.  The first time he took the stage was at the age of five, while on a family vacation.

 

At the time, his parents thought he was playing video games when suddenly, they heard the band announce that someone from the audience had requested to sing a song.

 

Five-year-old Cody took the stage and sang “Amarillo By Morning”, and the rest is history.

 

 

Cody Joe Hodges’ music has been described as “real country”, influenced by some of the country greats from the late 70s and 80’s – George Strait, Merle Haggard, Johnny Cash, Waylon Jennings, and Willie Nelson (just to name a few).

 

With his thrilling, high-energy performance, it is rare that you will find someone that reaches across the aisle to both the old and new generations, but Cody Joe Hodges does it every time.

 

Cody Joe Hodges’ voice ranges from silky smooth to raspy seduction.

 

Cody Joe’s sound is something out of the past, and his writing style of the here and now.

 

Cody Joe Hodges started playing music at an early age, but it wasn’t until his senior year in high school that he became serious about his art.

 

Cody Joe wrote his first song, “Daddy’s Dream”, his freshman year, while living in the dorms at Texas A&M University.  Not long after graduating from Texas A&M in 2006, the young talent spent a short stay in Nashville.

 

Afterward, deciding to “get away from music” and move back to Texas and join the Army. While in the Army, (duty station, Fort Carson), he was playing music on a street corner in Colorado Springs with a homeless man, when he was discovered by an Army affiliate.   He was then asked to audition for the group “Harmony in Motion,” a vocal ensemble based out of Fort Carson, Colorado.

 

After auditioning, they extended an offer to join them, and Cody Joe began traveling across America playing for large entertainment venues.

 

Upon discharge, his dad had a talk with him about a career in the power line business as a lineman. This sounded like something exciting and also a great opportunity to draw upon for songwriting, so he joined the energy field in 2010.

 

At the same time, he started a band called “The Linemen”, and released his first album in 2012.

 

In the spring of 2013, Cody Joe decided to exit out of the power line business and focus energy on his music as a solo artist, along with whatever plans God had for him. So far it has paid off, being awarded the 2016 Male Rising Star by the CMA’s of Texas.

 

Cody Joe lives life on the road, constantly touring and trying to get his music heard.

 

He currently resides in Nashville.  From humble beginnings, Cody Joe Hodges brings the drive and determination to attain National results.

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Tell us how you arrange your song.

This is one of the first songs that I ever learned.  One day I was playing around with “Amazing Grace” and I started singing it with the “House of the Rising Sun” melody.

 

My wife loved it, and once I played it in front of the band, my steel player suggested I add it to the middle of “The House of the Rising Sun”, which we had been playing out.  It had a great response, so we decided to record it.

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Discuss how you fix a tempo for your song.

Fortunately, I am surrounded by great musicians.  If I feel a song is dragging, normally I just let the drummer know and we get it back on track.

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Elaborate on multi-genre music.

This song is the first song that I’ve released that I would consider multi-genre.

 

My music is typically considered a “real country”.  This cover of “The House of the Rising Sun” is kinda a stretch to even call “Country” in my book.

 

It kinda lends to a more Americana, singer-songwriter or adult alternative genre.  I am definitely a country boy, but this shows my rockin’ countryside.

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Tell us the best means of reaching fans.

I am on Facebook every day, so the best way to reach me is through Facebook.

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Discuss the process involved in launching a musical career.

It’s a long process!  I have been gigging since 2002.  Of course, I started out gigging as a hobby, but in 2013 I made the decision to pursue music as a career.

 

It’s a struggle and a lot of hard work.  We have found that we tend to do better when we’re on the road, so we have been touring nationwide for the last several years.

 

I recently received a residency gig in Downtown Nashville, so I’ve been spending more time home (in Nashville), playing gigs and focusing on my songwriting.

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Tell us how to develop a lyric to a full song.

As I mentioned, we spend a lot of time on the road.  While traveling, there might be a destination that we visited, a person we met, or a story we hear that inspires us to write.

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Tell us how you come up with a melody.

The only way I can explain it is God.  Sometimes I will get a melody in my head, and I have no idea where it came from.  Then I’ll start playing it in a write (songwriting session), and someone else will add to it.  It’s actually a pretty cool process.

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Tell us your ideal type of recording studio.

Well, I’ve recorded in some of the best studios in Nashville and I’ve recorded in several home studios in Texas, Nashville, and Oklahoma.  I think the studio itself is less of a factor than the producer or engineer is in the final recording.

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Describe the factors you consider in a good song.

Does it have a good melody, a good message?   How does it make you feel after you listen to it?  Is it easy to understand, and can you dance to it?

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Tell us how you impact your listeners with your songs.

I try to put a positive message in every song I write.  It seems these days we are inundated with negative news, I would like to think my music creates an escape from the negative and makes someone’s day a little brighter.

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Tell us how you relate with producers and music directors.

I’ve met some great people along the way.  We have toured the nation doing radio interviews and meeting music directors and DJs, and it’s amazing to see how similar we all are.  There are some music directors that will be my forever friends.

 

As for producers, everyone I have worked with has been exceptionally talented.  I think finding the right producer is kinda like dating – there are all kinds of great, talented producers out there, it’s finding the one that will be the BEST for you and your music.

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Tell us how you feel after the completion of a song.

I rarely sit down to write without completing the song.  I know if I leave something unfinished, the likelihood of me coming back to finish it is slim to none.

 

Now, there are some songs that when I complete them, I know that I will need to come back and make a few changes.  Normally, I figure that out right before I cut the demo.

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Tell us your worst song and state the reason.

I don’t know about “worst song”, but my most disappointing song was when I first tried to release a song to radio off of my “Cody Hodges & the Lineman” CD.  I was ill-advised about what song I should release, and who I should use to promote it, so I ended up wasting a lot of money.  To make matters worse, the song I released had the name of my ex-wife in it.

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Tell us what you will change in your music.

I feel like when we are on the road, sometimes I pick up sounds that are kind of reminiscent of the area.  For instance, I wrote a song in San Francisco and it has a kinda singer-songwriter feel, I have another one that we just wrote that has a kind of bluegrass feel with a mandolin-sounding guitar lead.  Of course, writing with other songwriters, you kind of pick up things from their background as well.

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Tell us what is special about this release.

This is the first cover song that I have released.  It is also the first single that I have released that is not considered “real country”.  This song really showcases my vocals, and I wanted to release it just to show my diversity as an artist.

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Tell us about your future goals.

We have a lot of material that we’ve been stockpiling, looking for the right opportunity.  While I am proud of my past releases, I am excited about the material yet to be published.  I feel the writing just keeps getting better, and we are creating a sound that I can consider “my sound”.

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Tell us how you overcome obstacles.

Keep going.  I believe things get really hard before things get really good, so keep going – it’s about to get good.

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Elaborate on the song.

This is an updated version of an old classic.  It has kind of an eerie intro, with a major crescendo after the first few lines.  While this is a long song, it captures the listener’s attention with all the changes, stops and variances.

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Elaborate on your artist name and the title of the album.

Cody Joe Hodges is the artist name, and the single is “The House of the Rising Sun.”

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Mobile Version

Chelsey Danfield - Bathtub

Chelsey Danfield – Bathtub

 

 

 

 

 

Chelsey Danfield - Bathtub

Chelsey Danfield – Bathtub

 

 

 

 

 

Chelsey Danfield – Bathtub

 

ARTIST NAME: Chelsey Danfied

SONG TITLE:  Bathtub

 

ALBUM TITLE: At the Time

 

RELEASE DATE: 4-5-19

 

GENRE: Country

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Hot off the release of her second full-length album “At the Time”, it’s safe to say that this is the time for 26-year-old singer/songwriter, Chelsey Danfield.

 

Originating from her family’s cash crop and hobby farm in Maidstone, Ontario, Chelsey draws inspiration from her rural roots to create honest to goodness alternative country music, “I realized quickly growing up that country music told my family’s story. It was who we were and what we did.”

 

Compared to the likes of Mary Chapin Carpenter, Bonnie Raitt, Stevie Nicks, and Alannah Myles, Chelsey has cultivated a sound that incorporates elements of current and classic country, rock, blues, and a pinch of pop.

 

Debuting at the age of only 6 years old and continuing throughout her high school years, Chelsey played predominantly throughout Ontario and parts of Michigan both as a solo act and later on in experimental punk bands.

 

In 2012, while working as a guitar and vocal teacher in the sleepy lakeside community of Belle River, Ontario, Chelsey was introduced to Billboard  Hot  100  #1 hit producer and former Iggy  Pop/David   Bowie lead guitarist Stacy  Heydon, kick-starting her professional career.

 

Their collaboration has led to an EP release “All We Ever Do” in winter of 2017, her debut album, “Cowboy”, in spring of 2017, and her most recent release, “At the Time” on AMG Records.

 

Over the span of her 20 year career, Chelsey has performed all over Canada and the US, sharing the stage with acts like Kenny Chesney, the Zac Brown Band, Little Big Town, Dwight Yoakam, Mark Chesnutt, Lone Star, Justin Moore, and Blue Oyster Cult…and has no plans on stopping there.

 

From the red sands of Prince Edward Island to the heat scorched earth of the Mojave Desert, Chelsey brings a presence to the stage that commands the kind of attention that spans multiple genres and unites her audience in the shared woes of the overworked, underpaid and broken-hearted.

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Discuss your recording experience with your producer.

Recording albums with my producer has always been a really great experience. Especially during mixing, he really pushes me out of my comfort zone. At this point, we’ve been working together for so long that it’s old hat.

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Discuss what comes first and last while creating a song.

I generally start with a phrase that I like or a story that I want to tell. That generally leads to some rough guitar work and then it naturally flows from there. I’ve never been able to write just the music or just the lyrics first.

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Tell us the piece of advice you will give to a new artist.

Especially when you’re first getting started, play wherever you can, whenever you can. I have a really vivid memory of playing a homeless kitten and cat fundraiser with my first band when we were trying to get onto the scene. We got paid in cupcakes.

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Discuss your worse experience in the music business.

Even the worst experiences turn into learning experiences. I know that seems trite but it’s something I’ve learned to kind of embrace.

 

There are a lot of gigs where your music is a weird fit for the crowd or you’re just having a hard time connecting for whatever reason.

 

I’ve taught myself to enjoy those shows because I’m really playing for my own enjoyment.

 

I find I can really listen to the music I’m making and appreciate it by taking a step back and thinking about the lyrics that I’m singing and the story I’m telling.

 

You can almost form your own little bubble where you’re untouchable.

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Tell us how you deal with rejection.

The history of rejection as part of the human experience has always sucked and will continue to always suck hah. Whether it is rejection from someone you love or a record label. It sucks to put everything you are out there and get shot down but it’s the risk you take to make advances. Dare greatly.

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Tell us what you are doing to impact the people around you.

To impact the people around me, I’ve always tried to represent myself musically in a way that is true to who I am.

 

I used to teach guitar lessons to little girls and it is still a priority for me to give them a strong female role model that doesn’t take any crap.

 

Even though I haven’t taught in years I still try to not use “big swears” or over-sexualized things because I want them to listen to it and be proud.

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Tell us the music that makes you happy.

I mostly listen to older pop and rock-based stuff; Paul Simon, Elvis Costello, Tom Waits, Fleetwood Mac, ABBA (makes me insanely happy), Talking Heads, Donovan, Dire Straits, that sort of thing. More current stuff would be Primus, Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds, and Gogol Bordello.

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Tell us how you make instrumentation to your song.

I wish I could say that I’ve had years of technical/classical training that contributes to my instrumentation but I haven’t. I usually just noodle around until something sounds right which usually means inadvertently ignoring keys and proper counts.

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Tell us how you feel when you sing and your fans sing along to your song.

Like I’ve accomplished the goal of writing music in the first place – The best part of writing music and having people enjoy it is having that opportunity for connection i.e. connection to total strangers.

 

I think my understanding of this comes from being a regular concert-goer.

 

Hearing your favourite song and singing it back to the person that wrote it really provides a unique opportunity for spontaneous and simultaneous reciprocation.

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Tell us the goals you aim to achieve when creating a song.

I want to connect and I want to make music that people can either already relate to or music that they incorporate into their own story. I want to write that song that people drag their bashful boyfriend onto the dance floor to dance to or the one they turn on when they need to deal with and get through some sort of sadness they have in their life.

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Discuss your approach to writing.

Voice memos are my best friend. I turn off the radio when I’m driving and I force my brain to come up with something.

 

I sing random lines and tap rhythms on the steering wheel until something jives.

 

That then turns into a cringy voice memo that I have to sort through and make sense of after.

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Tell us how you plan to develop a unique music style.

I think that having diverse artistic influences and not forcing myself to just write pop or just write country helps me to develop a unique music style.

 

I don’t sit down saying, “okay I need to do a dancey country song”, and the songs largely write themselves if the intent isn’t forced.

 

I write when I’m on top of the world, I write when I’m depressed, and I think writing to complement my emotional state leads to the natural synchrony in the song and subject matter.

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Tell us how to record a song. 

I think to a lot of musicians, the recording process seems intimidating.

 

A lot of my stuff stays as a really basic voice memo recording on my phone up until the day it makes it to a studio session.

 

I’ve been extremely fortunate to work with super professional and skillful individuals in the studio so that’s forced me to step up to the plate and bring everything to the table as soon as we’re recording.

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Tell us if you are collaborating with other songwriters or you write alone.

I always write alone. I’m very easily distracted so when I sit down with other people, it usually gets off track within seconds and spirals out of control.

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Discuss your experience with fans.

Some of the best fan experiences I’ve had have come from the release of the song “Cowboy” and I’m excited to see what connections come out of the new album.

 

I’ve had so many people come up to me with tears in their eyes sharing similar experiences they had had with loved ones.

 

That song has given me so many beautiful and intimate moments with total strangers, many of which I stay in contact with on a regular basis.

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Discuss your experience with booking gigs and shows.

Booking gigs can be frustrating. You deal with a lot of characters (some good and some bad).

 

It’s a tough balance between gigging enough to get out there and still have enough time to develop your sound and write your own material.

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Tell us if you consider a song placement in TV or Film.

Absolutely, I think a lot of my music is really mood heavy, making it a good fit to accentuate emotionally charged cinematic moments.

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Elaborate on the song.

‘Bathtub’ was written as the female counterpart, not surprisingly, to Johnny Cash’s Cocaine Blues.

 

There are too many “wrecked your truck” or “took your dog” revenge songs so I liked the idea of a traditional 50’s house-wife type just completely losing it, killing her cheating husband and fleeing to Mexico to become a drug lord.

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Elaborate on your artist name and the title of the album.

Chelsey is my actual first name. Danfield was invented to have something kind of close…

 

“At the Time” was chosen as the album title and title track because as I was getting the tracks together, it felt like each song was tightly linked to a very specific time or chapter in my life.

This album really chronicles a lot of the events and people that shaped my idiosyncrasies.

 

I feel like what we become is largely due to the people we encounter and regardless if we’re aware of it or not, we pick up a little piece of them and incorporate it into the fabric that makes up who we are.

 

Mobile Version

Big City Cowgirl - Every Time

Big City Cowgirl – Every Time

 

 

 

 

 

 

Big City Cowgirl - Every Time

Big City Cowgirl – Every Time

 

 

 

 

 

 

ARTIST NAME: Big City Cowgirl

 

SONG TITLE: Every Time

 

RELEASE DATE: January 19, 2019

 

GENRE: Country

 

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Discuss your personality.

Growing up in New York, I’m a tough cookie. Sometimes I can say something and it comes across wrong because I have a very strong personality.

 

I am assertive, strong-willed, and totally type A. I have a playful and funny side too, and I love to laugh.  I am respectful of all people, and friendly. I am honest, practical, considerate and hard-working.

 

Oftentimes I find myself overextending myself to be helpful to those who ask for help.

 

I also try to be upbeat and positive. I filled my work space with all positive affirmation wall-hangings so that anyone who enters feels the favorable energy of the room, and that typically sets the tone of my interactions.

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Discuss your existence as a musician. 

I am an active songwriter who records about 2-3 songs a year. Although songs come to me at all times of the day and night, I try to dedicate time to do music every single evening.

 

I find it extremely helpful to listen to all types of music in my quest to develop interesting ideas for songs. I listen carefully to the things that people say and all the things that happen around me because there are valuable song titles and ideas everywhere.

 

I gravitate to creative people and welcome ideas to better my craft.

 

I play guitar well enough to put down my ideas for music, but I’m certainly not going to win awards for guitar proficiency. I really picked up the guitar as a means to share my ideas although I would love to find the time to become much better at it.

 

I seek out people’s input regarding my songs. For instance, I like to share my creations with co-workers and other non-musicians to get the public’s perspective on what I’m doing right or doing wrong.

 

Having music in me is like a blessing and a curse.  It’s a blessing always – but the curse side is when you love music and write music, your soul is longing to be doing that one thing above most other things all of the time, and unless you’re a mainstream artist who is making tons of money from music, it isn’t feasible to spend most of your time engaged in musical endeavors.

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Tell us the benefits and drawbacks of choosing music as a career.

I took a break in music to get a law degree, get married and start a family. When my daughter was just an infant, she had an affinity for music and I realized that I could balance my personal life with my love of music and desire to pursue a music career.

 

When you choose to work towards a music career, your lifestyle changes because you have to forfeit some time with your family and friends. You also have to prioritize your time in other ways. It can take a toll on your family because your family has to understand that sometimes you have to be in another room writing music, or at the studio recording and so forth. They have to listen to the writing stages where songs are being created.

 

For non-musicians, that can be annoying sometimes, because you are playing the same song over and over again, making changes, when they are trying to watch television and so forth.

 

There are also financial changes because you are spending money on music that could be used for other family purposes. You need supportive people around you or else you can lose relationships along the way.  I am blessed to have a family that encourages me on a daily basis.

 

It takes time, patience and perseverance, as well scheduling changes. Even my dogs are “all in” as they like to sit around me when I am writing songs.

 

The benefits of choosing a career in music are personal fulfillment, an opportunity for personal expression, a way to affect people and their emotions, making a contribution to the music community, and changing people for the positive through song.

 

The drawbacks are long hours, unpredictable schedules, uncertain results, financial risks, issues with trusting people in the music business, sorting out scams, and figuring out what is the proper way to proceed in terms of career goals.

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Tell us how you will manage fame as an established artist.

Being a bit older and having life experience, I think I will manage fame just fine.

 

I would keep my healthy habits, maintain a schedule, try not to take criticism too seriously, have close friends do reality checks on me to make sure that I remain the same person I was before the fame, keep as much of my private life private as I can, and interact appropriately with fans and other persons with whom I deal.

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Elaborate on the storyline of this song.

‘Every Time’ is a song that I wrote after a fight with my husband.

 

The first draft of the song was very different from how the song exists now.

 

Originally written in anger, the song is actually an anthem supporting marriage.

 

The lyrics talk about how even though your partner may drive you insane sometimes, you would still choose them again and again because they are the right fit for you.

 

Every married person whom I let listen to the song before it was released told me they could relate to the song.

 

After it was released, I got the same feedback from people who heard it.

 

The song takes you through the thought process of a person who has been married for a while. I like to say that it’s about “real life marriage.”

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Share your press release and reviews with us.

Big City Cowgirl is not your average country music singer / songwriter.

 

She blends her urban upbringing in Brooklyn – along with the eclectic musical tastes ingrained in her, and encouraged, by her parents – to create her own distinctive country music sound.

 

Sometimes twangy, sometimes gritty, sometimes sounding a little too New Yawk in her songs, she credits her sense of eccentricity and playfulness, coupled with how a song’s mood strikes her when she is writing it, as to how she sings each song.

 

“I never know who’s gonna come out of me,” she laughs, “and I go with it.”

 

Regardless, her raspy, notable voice is undeniably recognizable in every tune.

 

Big City Cowgirl’s love of music dates back as far as she can remember.

 

She acknowledges that she doesn’t follow the mainstream – she writes from her heart and soul – whatever comes naturally – and hopes that she makes her musical mark.

 

Her aim is straightforward – to make a positive difference in peoples’ lives through song.

 

To that end, she says that her greatest desire is for her songs to become a part of the soundtrack of people’s lives.

 

“I won’t stop making music because it’s cathartic for me,” she says candidly, “and if what I write resonates with people that’s a win / win for me.”

 

Case in point – her most recent song entitled EVERY TIME.

 

“It’s a song about how marriage really goes down,” she laughs, “and everyone who hears it has told me that they can relate.”

 

A self-proclaimed anomaly, Big City Cowgirl credits her inspiration as being everything she experiences on a daily basis.  She certainly has a lot of material from which to choose.

 

“My experiences run the gamut so the motivation for my creativity is everywhere,” she explains, “By day, I have a very rewarding job in the legal profession and by night, I am a mom, a wife, a friend, a songwriter, and just about everything else to everyone else.”

Big City Cowgirl resides in New York with her husband, her daughter and her four dogs.

 

She is a supporter of animal rights, and making the world a better place for future generations.

 

She believes in God, her country, dreams coming true, and living life with a sense of purpose.

 

“I’m just having fun, she exclaims, “But in a responsible way. If that makes any sense – Isn’t that what life is all about?”

Big City Cowgirl expects 2019 to be personally and professionally phenomenal.

 

As she puts it, “I am truly blessed in every way and I count those blessings every day.”

 

REVIEWS

“Big City Cowgirl is true to her persona, hailing from New York and making old-soul cowgirl tunes that would impress even the most die-hard of old-school country fans…Her high-pitched, raspy and vibrato-heavy voice creates a sound reminiscent of classic women in country before her like Loretta Lynn and Dolly Parton.”

 – Crank It Country, Conner Fersner

 

“Big City Cowgirl’s voice and musical stylings are a throwback to when the music ran the business – The kind that elicits smiles and leaps of joy. She forges real feelings that leave you reeling, not the Hallmark greeting card trifles or the chauvinistic posturing that characterizes so much of today’s country music. No, friends, this is the real deal – well written, well played, and well sung.”

– Soundlooks, Jeena Johnson

 

“With a voice that has the strength, range, and beauty along the likes of Carrie Underwood, Grace Slick, and Stevie Nicks…Big City Cowgirl has a very dynamic vocal delivery and sustains many defining factors that make her stand out with a very captivating and charismatic aura.”

– Artist Reach, Justyn Brodsky

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Discuss the changes in your life as an artist.

I have been writing lyrics and melodies since I was a little girl. I was always expressing my feelings and experiences through songs.

 

As I got older; different styles of music and experiences shaped me to become how I am today as an artist.

 

The older I get, the more versatile I have become and the more open I am to ideas.

 

I used to co-write tunes, but when I wrote one on my own, I was married to the song the way that I wrote it.

 

Now, whether I’m co-writing or not, I am more flexible about the end product.

 

I also don’t have to be the center of attention. I remember being in a band and I was the lead vocalist. The Bassist wanted to sing a song, and I was opposed to it, and felt threatened and insulted by it.  Today, that would never happen. I appreciate everyone’s contributions to a song and I can sing a duet or share a stage with someone because it isn’t a competition, it’s a community.

 

The bottom line is that I know that I’ve improved as a songwriter and as a person.

 

As far as changes in how other people view me, it’s always fun to have people contact me about my songs – people that I don’t know.

 

Also, I recently had someone sing one of my own songs to me while I was commuting on the train, which was fun.

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Explain what you have in mind before considering music as a career.

I thought about the impact it would have on my life, my family, my friends, my lifestyle and my finances.

 

I also thought about how the music business is a hard business and I knew that I would have to deal with accolades as well as plenty of rejection.

 

I also thought that I wanted to have an effect on people and become a part of the soundtrack of their lives.

 

Music is cathartic for me and it makes me happy when I am creating it so it was really great when I discussed it with my family and they were totally on board.

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Discuss your experience in life. 

I grew up in Brooklyn, New York and wrote songs as far back as I can remember.

 

I had insomnia as a child and would stay up at night writing songs.

 

I joined bands playing all styles of music. I even created an East Coast / West Coast female dance music duo with my best friend, Mimi Rossi!

 

I worked in nightclubs, which was fun, because I got to be around people who wanted to have fun, and I got to be around music.

 

I also spent time in bars listening to bands. I just soaked it all in.  Eventually, I focus on starting a family and establishing a career in law.

 

Then I realized that you can never take a break from music because it will always call out to you.

 

After my daughter was born, I decided to pursue music again. Music is fulfilling to me, but I do have to say that my career in law is fulfilling as well as I am able to help people navigate difficult situations.

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Name the artists that have influenced the world.

From my perspective, some of the artists that have influenced the world are Madonna, Michael Jackson, Sting, and Bob Marley.

 

Since I do country music, I’d like to mention a few artists who are country that have influenced the world as well. Those are Bob Dylan, Johnny Cash, Dolly Parton, Waylon Jennings, Merle Haggard, Willie Nelson and Loretta Lynn.

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Discuss your moment of rejections as an artist and how you are able to cope and move on with your career.

I have had accolades and I have had horribly crippling rejections.

 

The music business is tough and it’s controlled by certain people who dictate what is hot and what is not.

 

I write my truth and I don’t really care about whether or not it will be widely accepted in the business.

 

If you don’t believe in yourself and your talent, you will be sucked under the muck.

 

The general public is made to believe that only the tastemakers know what good music is.

 

If a song is played enough times on the radio, people will start to like it.

 

My songs are played predominantly on internet radio, and some terrestrial stations, but I am not being played on mainstream radio right now.

 

When I have experienced negative comments, I’d be a liar if I didn’t say that it had an effect on me.

 

No matter how positive you are and no matter how many great things you hear about your music, it’s that one comment of rejection that will totally stop your breath.

 

I get past rejection by remembering that everyone has an opinion so it’s just one person’s opinion.  And especially when someone’s opinion doesn’t matter to you, it shouldn’t count. I guess the fear is that the person knows more than you do or they will have some influence about how others think of you.

 

When you do the craft, you have to just do it and do it for yourself first and foremost. So I get through rejection by reminding myself of these types of things.

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Tell us the most negative comment you have ever received.

I submitted one of my songs for a critique years ago and it got trashed. I can’t remember what the comments were – because I’ve probably blocked them out of my head – LOL – but it really crushed me and it took me time to recover because I doubted my whole ability to write songs.

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Elaborate on the song. 

The song was recorded at Dare Studios of Long Island with my long-time producer, Mike Epstein.  It’s a little bit of a family affair. Mike plays various instruments. On Every Time, he played bass guitar. His wife, Hillary Epstein, sang background vocals on the track. His brother, Rob Epstein, played keyboards on the song. Skip Krevens plated guitar and pedal steel guitar, and Mike Sapienza played drums.

 

Aside from three of the musicians playing on the tune being related, all of the musicians have played on a number of my tunes and so it always feels like family when we are recording.

 

It’s a no-judgment zone and I am open to all ideas. When we all get together after I first pen a tune, it’s a beautiful thing how the song starts to fully form with all instruments.

 

All of the musicians who record with me are seasoned cover band and studio musicians.

 

All of these musicians have a wealth of talent, and have a keen sense of what I want out of a song.

 

It was no different with Every Time. After the song was fully produced, recorded and mixed, it was sent to Nashville, Tennessee to be mastered by Steve Corrao at Sage Audio.

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State your artist’s name and elaborate on it. 

I write and record under the name Big City Cowgirl. I chose the name Big City Cowgirl because I think it explains my core being.

 

I’m a girl who grew up in New York who loves Country Music and all things country.

 

I chose the name so that it would be reflective of my urban upbringing along with my country music heart.

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State the title of the song and the meaning.

The title of the song is EVERY TIME.  Its meaning revolves around the fact that relationships may not be perfect, but you get through the good and the bad together.

 

Despite moments where you feel overwhelmed and want to walk out the door, people build lives together and that is something to be admired and cherished.

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State the title of the album and the reason for choosing the title.

This song was released as a single. I released an EP entitled City Zipcode, Country Heart a while back, and since then I have been releasing singles. I chose the album title, City Zipcode, Country Heart, because once again it was indicative of my life in New York, but love of country music, and desire to move to the country.

 

Mobile Version

Halloway Road – Get The Girl

Holloway Road – Get The Girl

 

 

 

 

 

 

Halloway Road – Get The Girl

Halloway Road – Get The Girl

 

 

 

 

 

 

Holloway Road (Jack Cooper and Rob Gulston) are one of the most amazing new duos in country-pop music.

 

Having had extensive radio support from the BBC, Chris Country and Downtown Radio in the UK, and WSM-AM in the USA; over half a million streams for their music to date; and sharing stages with the likes of The Shires, Lindsay Ell, American Young and more, and many major festival appearances including AEG’s high profile Country to Country & Country Music Week events and the first ever The Long Road Festival.

 

National media coverage to date has included Vice, Country Music Magazine, Maverick, and The Daily Mail…

 

With support from fans worldwide and three iTunes Top Five EPs to date, success in a growing international country scene looks like an inevitable part of the Holloway Road story.

 

Late in 2017 the duo completed their first full band headline tour, documented in the video for standalone single ‘Under Cover’ and in part inspiring the follow up track ‘No Place’ about the experience of being an artist on the road; and during the summer of 2018 they came back to Nashville to record their third EP ‘Broke’, which is available to stream / download now, with a huge response from fans and over 100k streams within the first few weeks of release.

 

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Mobile Version

Ronald Dorsey - Cost Me A Bottle of Jack

Ronald Dorsey

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ronald Dorsey - Cost Me A Bottle of Jack

Ronald Dorsey – Cost Me A Bottle of Jack

 

 

 

 

 

ARTIST NAME: Ronald Dorsey

 

SONG TITLE: Cost Me A Bottle of Jack

 

ALBUM TITLE: Cost Me A Bottle of Jack

 

RELEASE DATE: February 28, 2019

 

GENRE: Country

 

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Discuss your music career.

I started singing in church at age 9. I played and sang in various bands throughout the years, work on songwriting, and here I am today, with a new hit single, “Cost Me A Bottle Of Jack.”

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Brief us on how to impress fans during a live performance.

I love acoustic performances with just piano or guitar along with my voice.

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List the names of your biggest supporters.

My producer: Mike Griot

 

My duet partner: Margeaux Davis

 

My friends and family.

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Discuss your experience as an artist.

It’s been fun and enlightening along the way. Everyday encounters furnish me with food for songs.

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Tell us the biggest mistake you have ever made in your music career.

Trying to record in the studio with inexperienced musicians.

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Discuss the story behind the song.

The story was inspired by a gambler I knew who also drank too much.

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Tell us how to fund a music project.

I used the proceeds from teaching music lesson to finance this project.

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Discuss your opinion on the safety of fans during shows and live performances.

The audience for shows that I do are very cool, calm, and collective.

 

I think the makeup of the audience has a lot to do with the overall safety of the performance.

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Tell us the greatest piece of advice someone has given you as an artist.

Do it from your heart and you’ll never have any regrets.

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Tell us what you will improve or change in your music.

Nothing.

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Discuss vocal training and how you protect your vocal.

I do vocal exercises at least an hour every other day.

 

To protect my voice, I stay away from smokers, and try not to shout or speak loudly.

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Discuss your best mood during performance.

I’m always happy when I can perform.

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List your best artists with reasons.   

Reckless Kelly: amazing acoustic performance of great songs.

 

John Mayer: the versatility to perform in many genres with equal skill.

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Discuss your existence as an artist.

I teach, write, and perform music for a living.

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Tell us the greatest problem you think is facing the society and the solution.

Homelessness is a big problem. The solution is to bring back factory jobs to the big cities.

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Discuss your songwriting and recording.

I write on piano and guitar. I record the naked piano or guitar version, and then work with a producer to get a great studio performance with a band for the final product.

 

I don’t use any drum machines, or samples.

 

I only use musicians for all my recordings.

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State your artist’s name and elaborate on it.

Ronald Dorsey (that’s my name).

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State the title of the song and the meaning.

Cost Me A Bottle Of Jack  – I lost a bet, and paid with a bottle of Jack Daniels.

 

Mobile Version

Erin Gibney – King of Hearts

Erin Gibney – King of Hearts

 

 

 

 

 

 

Erin Gibney – King of Hearts

Erin Gibney – King of Hearts

 

 

 

 

 

Erin Gibney – King of Hearts

 

ARTIST NAME:  Erin Gibney

 

SONG TITLE:  King of Hearts

 

RELEASE DATE: March 1, 2019

 

GENRE: Country

 

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Coming from New England, Erin Gibney puts a new and refreshing spin on country music.

 

She has been performing since she was 11 years old and came to Nashville in September 2016 to record the beginning 2 songs in her first album.

 

After falling in love with the city, she decided to move to Nashville last year to be closer to the studio and producer helping to make her music possible.

 

Along with singing live around Nashville, Gibney worked hard on her debut album, BOLD, which released on April 12th, 2018.

 

Gibney has had the incredible honor of working alongside well-known and respected Nashville musicians under the guidance of her producer, Buddy Hyatt, for this album.

 

These Grammy and CMA winning musicians include, Brent Mason, Bobby Terry, Zach Allen, Wayne Killius, Duncan Mullins, Scott Sanders, Hale White, and Buddy Hyatt himself.

 

Gibney now is excited to introduce her newest single, King of Hearts.

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Tell us what your fans are saying about your music.

Fans have been so encouraging about my past music, but especially my latest single, “King of Hearts.”

 

The single is about heartbreak and seems to resonate with listeners.

 

They have given me an outpouring of love and support that I am so thankful for.

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Tell us the factors you consider in choosing a song as your favourite.

When choosing a song as my favorite song, I usually rely on the lyrics.

 

Lyrics are such a powerful part of music for me because they tell a story about experiences in someone’s life.

 

It’s really emotional and intimate to be immersed in someone’s story through music.

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Tell us the names of producers you will collaborate if you have the chance.

I absolutely love the work I have done with my current producer, Buddy Hyatt.

 

I would love to meet and collaborate with Maren Morris, Frank Liddell, and Jay Joyce.

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Tell us the names of the songwriters you will collaborate if you have the chance.

Chris DeStefano, Barry Dean, Natalie Hemby, Nicolle Galyon, Matt Ramsey, Heather Morgan, Liz Rose, Shane McAnally, Josh Kear, Max Martin, Ali Payami, and Luke Laird are all absolutely amazing songwriters who have written some of my favorite works.

 

I would love to meet and collaborate with them.

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Tell us your favourite TV show and state your reason.

My favorite TV show is Friends because I love watching the show that makes me laugh.

 

The show can instantly put me in a better mood and I think it shows the importance and value of genuine friendship.

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Tell us your best mood to create a song.

I would say empowered is the best mood for me to write a song because it puts me in the mindset that anything is possible.

 

Those are the times when I put out lyrics that best showcase my abilities.

 

I remember feeling so motivated the day I wrote my song, Bold, because it was shortly after I moved to Nashville for the first time.

 

The same goes for King of Hearts. I remember waking up and realizing I deserved more than I was getting in this relationship. The song just fell from my mind on to paper after that.

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Tell us your interpretation of fame or success.

I think fame and success are two totally different things.

 

Success is working towards a goal, facing failure, pushing past that failure, and ultimately achieving the goal you set out to do.

 

Fame doesn’t always come hand in hand with success. Fame can be obtained from anything that draws media and social attention to someone, which can sometimes come from the effects of success.

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Tell us the names of artists you will collaborate with if you have the chance.

I would love to collaborate with Carrie Underwood, Kelsea Ballerini, Maren Morris, Carly Pearce, Reba, Dolly Parton, Taylor Swift, etc.

 

These are all women of such power who inspire me and my music every single day.

 

I am also a huge fan of Bruce Springsteen, Brett Eldredge, Keith Urban, Ron Pope, Chris Stapleton, and Gavin Degraw. Their music is so beautiful and moving and has actually inspired a lot of my own music as well.

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Tell us about your experience performing on stage for the first time or recording in the studio for the first time.

My first time on stage was when I was 11 years old. I performed a Bob Dylan song at my local middle school and was unbelievably nervous.

 

I remember stepping on stage with shaking knees, but suddenly feeling a sense of calm and knowing that I had found my place. It was so beautiful. That was the day I dedicated myself to music and decided it was the career and passion I was going to chase.

 

My first time recording in the studio was absolutely unforgettable. Hearing my own music being played over the headphones was an overwhelming sense of joy. I fell in love with the entire process!

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Tell us how you approach songwriting.

Songwriting is a very personal experience for me because I draw moments of my life into my music.

 

I usually sit down right after an inspiring moment in my life and write in my journal about it. I then derive the lyrics of my songs from that journal entry. This helps me because it doesn’t structure my thoughts right away. I get the opportunity to pour everything onto a page before trying to put it into a story with music.

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Tell us your opinion on blending genres or experimenting with sound.

Blending genres is something that I respect for artists because it gets them out of their comfort zones.

 

Music isn’t supposed to be structured, it’s supposed to mean something.

 

To me, if there is a song that resonates with you and you want to perform, it shouldn’t matter what genre it’s a part of.

 

Blending genres is something I have always been very open to and encouraging of.

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Tell us how you deal with rejection.

Rejection is hard whenever it comes, but I always remind myself that opportunities come and go.

 

When I fail in one, I know that there is another one around the corner. I see rejection as just room for improvement and growth.

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Elaborate on what compels you to sing.

I sing to connect. Growing up, I remember first listening to music and realizing that whatever I was going through, someone else was going through as well.

 

Music unites people. It is something we all love and connect to…

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Tell us how you record your vocals.

I record my vocals with my current producer, Buddy Hyatt, in his Nashville studio.

 

I give the song everything I have in a few takes and then narrow in on making my dialogue, diction, and pitch perfect to my standards.

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Tell us the software you used mostly for recording.

I use Pro Tools mostly for my recording.

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Discuss the selling of CDs and selling of digital files through digital stores.

Selling CDs can be a powerful tool, especially at live shows.

 

However, I think selling digital files through digital stores is the most effective tool in distributing music today because of how convenient it is for the listeners.

 

Digital stores are so widely used which is why I find promoting them helps my career more than selling physical CDs.

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Elaborate on the song.

“King of Hearts,” is a song about intense heartbreak. It is about falling in love with someone who breaks your trust, your heart, and your mind.

 

I remember writing this song in such a dark place, but realizing, through music, it turned a hard situation into a work of art. My pain became beautiful and powerful.

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Elaborate on your artist name and the title of the album.

My artist name is Erin Gibney, which is my given name.

 

The title of my latest EP, Bold, came from the feeling of empowerment that I felt the day I moved to Nashville. I felt “Bold” for the first time in my life!

 

The title of my single, King of Hearts, came from the feeling of sparks and excitement that I originally felt in regards to the person this song is about.

 

They made me feel like how I imagine Las Vegas to always be. The reference comes from that feeling.

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Share your press release and review with us.

 

Singer Songwriter, Erin Gibney, Announces Release of New Single

 

March 1, 2018

 

Nashville, Tennessee

 

Following the release of her latest EP, Bold, Erin Gibney puts out a new single about heartache and broken trust. Lyrics like, “I was doomed from the first touch…” “Wish I had seen it from the start…” “He’s a King of Hearts, but he’ll tear you apart…” paint the story of her hurt.

 

Gibney says the song derives from a dark time in her life, but says this song turned her pain into power.

 

Erin Gibney is a country singer / songwriter from New England who moved to Nashville in 2017.

 

She attended Belmont University as a Music Business major and worked on her debut EP, Bold.

 

She has auditioned for television shows such as NBC The Voice, American Idol, and America’s Got Talent.

 

Gibney’s love for performing drove her to sing in places like Douglas Corner and Puckett’s Grocery and Restaurant.

 

“King of Hearts” is a song about broken promises and a broken heart.

 

It is about being naive in the face of lies until you ultimately get hurt.

 

Despite its heartbreaking tone, Gibney says this song turned her anger into a work of art. She says telling this story through music made it beautiful in her eyes. She explains while the situation is something she was hurt by, she was ultimately reborn from it.

 

Mobile Version

Katy Hurt – Natchez

Katy Hurt – Natchez

 

 

 

 

Katy Hurt – Natchez

Katy Hurt – Natchez

 

 

 

 

Katy Hurt proves to be one of the finest country singers as she impresses listeners with her powerful vocals.

 

Her vocal will make listeners to enjoy her song.

 

She sings from the heart.

 

Her vocal is deep.

 

Performance of Katy Hurt in the song entitled ‘Natchez’ is extraordinary.

 

‘Natchez’ is a mix of Katy’s melodic vocal with a smooth sound from the guitar.

 

Simple video of ‘Natchez’ features Katy siting under a tree while a guy is playing a guitar to the song.

 

Power of katy’s vocals beautifies the song.

 

Katy Hurt is here to make history in the country scene with the release of ‘Natchez’.

Broadtube Music Channel

 

 

Katy Hurt has become a leading light on the UK Country/Americana scene without having released a full length studio album.

 

 

2018 has seen her nominated for “Best Country/Folk Act” at the Unsigned Music Awards and performing festival slots at Country 2 Country, BlackDeer, Rhythmtree, Cornbury and many more.

 

 

Katy spent 2017 and 2018 performing at 100+ shows each year around the country since the launch of her EP “Pieces of Me” and praised singles from her upcoming EP “Unfinished Business.

 

 

With songs impressing fans by combining the honest lyrical content of a country with riffs and haunting vocals.

Recent highlights include:

 

Main support to Liam Gallagher at Worthy Farm for The Pilton Party

 

Both current and earlier single play-listed on Chris Country FM, BBC introducing and many local stations

 

Shortlisted for best Country/Folk act at the Unsigned Music Awards

 

Opened for Jools Holland at Kimbolton Castle

 

Far exceeded target for EP Pledge Campaign to record with Juno winning producer Murray Pulver in Winnipeg, Canada

 

Major festival appearances including C2C and Black Deer.

 

 

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Mobile Version

Matt Westin - You Leave Me No Choice

Matt Westin

Matt Westin – You Leave Me No Choice

 

 

 

 

 

Matt Westin - You Leave Me No Choice

Matt Westin – You Leave Me No Choice

 

 

 

 

Matt Westin – You Leave Me No Choice

 

Matt Westin drops an impressive and romantic country song entitled “You Leave Me No Choice” that will thrill country music fans forever with his enticing vocals blended with a lively country tune.

 

Matt Westin took a huge gamble. He placed an enormous bet on himself and went “all in” on his music career.

 

The former engineer-turned-country artist is reaping the rewards of his poker face in the form of awards, radio airplay, critical acclaim and an appearance in the industry’s prestigious “bible,” Billboard Magazine.

 

Now, Matt is dropping his latest song and lyric video, “You Leave Me No Choice.” The single is from his first album, “Legacy” (MTS Records).

 

Released originally in January 2018, the album was re-released by MTS in October, under their new distribution deal with AWAL.

 

“Legacy” was produced by industry veteran Bryan Cole, and features performances from studio greats, Mike Brignardello (Blake Shelton, Big & Rich) on bass and Steve Hinson (Dolly Parton, Luke Bryan) on pedal steel.

 

Matt Westin’s debut single, “Our Redneck of the Woods” reached the IndieWorld Country chart and the European Country Music Association charts. Matt was also on the Top 200 International Country Artists chart.

 

His second song, “Farm Town” is still climbing several airplay charts. Matt is the 2018 International Music and Entertainment Association Male Country Artist of the Year. His Emerging Artists ad appeared in the October 10, 2018 issue of Billboard Magazine.

 

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Mobile Version

Heather Whitney – What Part Of Life

Heather Whitney – What Part Of Life

Heather Whitney – What Part Of Life

 

 

 

 

 

Heather Whitney – What Part Of Life

Heather Whitney – What Part Of Life

 

 

 

 

Heather Whitney – What Part Of Life

 

Brand new single “What Part of Life,” written by Heather and produced by Buddy Hyatt, is being released on September 8th, 2018. It’s already on the New Music Weekly country charts!

 

Singer-Songwriter, Heather Whitney comes from an itty-bitty, one-red-light town deep in the pines of Southeast Texas, where the mosquitoes are big, but Heather’s love for music is bigger!

 

Heather’s debut album, “Moving on” is full of love, heartbreak, and moving on. This album is everything she has lived through, felt, and overcame, while in the studio. “Just because you’re working towards your dreams, doesn’t mean that the world stops spinning, and hardships won’t find you,” says Heather. “What gave me the strength to complete my album, was knowing that I was not alone and that someone else out there would hear these songs, relate to them, and possibly gain some healing like I did. We have to stick together.”

 

Heather spent the last year flying back and forth from Newton, TX to Nashville, TN, writing, hand-picking songs for the album, and recording with producer, Buddy Hyatt. She just wrapped and released her first music video for her single “Shut Up And Dance” and her album “Moving On” (Now available on iTunes)!

 

“Everyone who was a part of this project was there because of their belief in me, and I’m forever humbled and thankful for them and this experience. Everything that I put into this album will absolutely translate to the listener! Hope y’all enjoy it!”

 

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