Ekat Bork - Shamania

Ekat Bork – Shamania

 

Ekat Bork - Shamania

Ekat Bork – Shamania

 

Artist Name:  Ekat Bork

 

Song Title:  Shamania

 

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Ekat Bork unveils a powerful visual for the song entitled ‘Shamania.’

 

Ekat thrills with uniqueness in musical work.

 

The visual is also one of a kind.

 

More!

Ekat Bork plays with great energy and communicative power, her energy on stage can turn even a small concert hall into an unforgettable event.

 

The diversity in her music is intriguing Ekat Bork is creating her very own introspective electronic music.

 

Ekat Bork, eclectic Swiss artist of Siberian origins, continually breaks boundaries in every aspect of her life.

 

As an alternative electronic artist, she uses a combination of unique sounds and visuals to rupture societal norms.

 

Ekat expresses herself by writing music, lyrics, arrangements and by directing and editing her music videos.

 

Ekat Bork recorded two challenging, uncompromising albums, “VERAMELLIOUS” and “YASДYES” highly appreciated by the public and by the international critics.

 

Ekat performed over 100 concerts in Europe and she reached the most important stages in Switzerland and the swiss national television.

 

In late 2017 “KONTROL”, an EP of vast electronic atmospheres emerged.

 

In 2018, she embarks on her Solo EU and INDIA Tour.

 

In May 2019 Ekat Bork was nominated, in the electronic music category, Swiss Live Talent for Awards.

 

Her new video-single “SHAMANIA” introduces the upcoming Album “EKAT.”

 

Credits:

Director: Marco Carlos Cordaro

Editing: Marco Carlos Cordaro/ Ekat Bork

Production : GinkhoBox , Silvio Cattaneo

 

 

Actor: Chris Badjang

Extra: Ekat Bork

Bodypaint & costumes: Emanuele Borello

Camera: Simone Forti

Assistant: Silvio Cattaneo , Fabrizio Airaghi

Hair dresser: Gabriele Valente

Studio assistant: Davide Fascetta

 

Location: Monochrome studios, Milan

 

Lyrics:

When I was blinded

When I was stupid

Could I pray?

Who should I pray to?

I asked my tablet

My on-line shaman

Set me free

Epiphany

 

Tick- tock tick tock

Slave of technology

Tick- tock- tick- tock

Tied to chronology

Tick- tock- tick- tock

Down on your knees and.. pray

 

Tick- tock tick tock

Instagram Whatsapp

Tick- tock- tick- tock

Netflix claptrap

Tick- tock- tick- tock

Down on your knees and.. pray

 

Living your popcorn life in the cinema

Technicolor love at the back of the cinema

Digital insanity is caught in the camera

 

Tick-tock tick-tock

Down on your knees boy

 

Am I at war?

Is this a war?

I’m not so easy

Let’s take Brindisi

 

Mama told me that I don’t have to rush

It is enough that I am living too much

I’m electricity

Connect internally

I live in binary

Binary

Algorithm maths

 

Tick- tock tick tock

Live by the battery

Tick- tock- tick- tock

FitBit flattery

Tick- tock- tick- tock

Down on your knees and pray

 

Tick- tock tick tock

Bow to the X-Box

Tick- tock- tick- tock

Fuck like (sleep with) a sex bot

Tick- tock- tick- tock

Down on your knees boy

 

You’ve been

 

Living your wi-fi life on diazepam

Technicolor dreams getting lost in your glam spam

Physical reality is live on Amazon

Primetime box sets streamed to your brain

 

Get the Satan far behind me

I can live without temptation

Leave it to me

Whatever, leave it to me

 

Maybe I will google a pair of new shoes…

 

Hey!

 

Tick- tock tick tock

Instagram Whatsapp

Tick- tock- tick- tock

Netflix claptrap

Tick- tock- tick- tock

Down on your knees and.. pray

Tick- tock tick tock

Slave of technology

Tick- tock- tick- tock

Tied to chronology

Tick- tock- tick- tock

Down on your knees boy

 

Living your popcorn life in the cinema

Technicolor love at the back of the cinema

A family of idiots is living on Amazon Prime

Tick-tock cranked up on Pokemon

 

 

Katie Marshall - Down Here

Katie Marshall – Down Here

 

Katie Marshall - Down Here

Katie Marshall – Down Here

 

ARTIST NAME: Katie Marshall

 

SONG TITLE: Down Here

 

ALBUM TITLE: The Great Unknown

 

RELEASE DATE: July 12, 2019

 

GENRE: Indie Pop/Electro Pop

 

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The latest Katie Marshall project includes plush productions of her trademark rich vocal melodies and addictive choruses.

 

Katie borrows the electronic pop sensibility of The Postal Service and the up-front, hooky vocals of Maggie Rogers while avoiding the sugary-sweet overload of mainstream pop.

 

Thickly layered harmonies and haunting themes surround her newest album, The Great Unknown, released in July 2019.

 

Katie Marshall has played in various indie-rock bands (Parts for all Makes, SKIRT, Kill-Me Kare Bare, Eve & The Apple, Corey Palmer and Lovetrade, The Katie Marshall Three-Oh), and has toured the country from Seattle to New York.

 

She has performed on TV’s “Drinking With Ian”, “Modern Rock Twin Cities,” and has been a featured artist on Minnesota Public Radio’s “The Local Show.”

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Discuss your composition and melody.

I tried to play with a couple of different themes with this album, exploring outside the traditional song structure and punctuating things with dissonance to feed into the over-arching themes of the record.

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State the name of your producer and elaborate on the song. Adrian Suarez produced ‘The Great Unknown.’ He took my unpolished demos of the tunes and really elevated everything, especially with the song “Down Here.”

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Discuss the lyrics of the song.

“Down Here” is about sitting in silence with a million things to say, and having it bubble up and eventually spill out in a big, messy explosion.

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Elaborate on your music career.

I’ve been playing music in one form or another since I was about 14.

 

I started in the solo/acoustic singer/songwriter world and really cut my teeth on stage as a solo performer.

 

I joined some heavier-hitting bands in my 20s and have been mostly playing in indie-rock bands since then, dabbling in studio work and jazz when the opportunities arise.

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Discuss your motive behind making music.

“Motive” implies that there is some conscious, controllable choice to make music. For me, writing music and performing it has always felt like an involuntary impulse that I am hard-pressed to ignore.

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Discuss your songwriting.

I usually write and record my songs all at once. Demoing my new songs has really become entwined with my songwriting process, to the point where I will have half-finished songs recorded and almost fully produced… only they’re missing several verses, or a bridge or something.

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Tell us your opinion on using rhymes dictionary or writing software to develop lyrics. 

There are a lot of tools out there to help us choose our words. I’m a big fan of language, so the thesaurus has always been a good friend to me. I think that a potential pitfall of using some of those tools is that songwriters can try so hard to sound clever that it really just comes off as trite. I try to think about whether or not I would actually say the sentence I’m putting in my song, and if it’s a no – that line needs to go. Look. I rhymed.

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Discuss the music industry.

It has changed a lot since I started making music. I love that there are so many more opportunities for independent artists out there.

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Elaborate on how you prepare yourself for a recording session.

Whiskey, mostly…

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Brief us on your preference in terms of tempo as in up-tempo, mid-tempo or slow tempo.

Whatever best suits the tone and subject of the song – there’s a place for everything I think.

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Discuss your shows or live performance.

I always prefer to be on stage with others, I’m kind of over the solo thing. I prefer to collaborate and share the experience with other musicians. Also, I have a nasty habit of strange and silly stage banter when I’m on my own… Not my most charming attribute, I’m afraid.

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Tell us the themes of most of your compositions.

Honestly, I had a hard year. I wrote a bunch of songs about my hard year. I wrote songs about the kind of love that makes your stomach flip, and love that makes you flip inside out: raw and vulnerable and sometimes broken. And then I recorded those songs and left it all in the studio. More than I’ve ever done.

 

Mobile Version

HiCONiK + Exxy - Divine

HiCONiK + Exxy – Divine

 

HiCONiK + Exxy - Divine

HiCONiK + Exxy – Divine

 

ARTIST NAME: HiCONiK + Exxy

 

SONG TITLE: Divine

 

ALBUM TITLE: Divine – Single

 

RELEASE DATE: May 31, 2019

 

GENRE: Electronic/Pop

 

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The project of HiCONiK, a 22-year-old Florida based producer, is one that alters the classic sounds of modern music. Composed with groundbreaking sound design, he has devised an entirely new genre.

 

While producing self-made mixes for local events as well as working on collaborations with many local artists, Spencer Smith quickly grew a presence as a Producer/DJ throughout high school.

 

After countless hours perfecting his craft, “Modern Music” was released Mid-August of 2018. This album features a wide variety of sound, perfectly demonstrating his purpose to forever revolutionize music.

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State your favourite instruments.

I grew up playing the piano and guitar, so I would say I definitely favour these over others. I do love the classical sound of the violin accompanying the piano. I try to incorporate as many live instruments into my music as possible.

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List the names of those supporting you.

Matt Parenti is by far the biggest support to my brand. Nicolaas Ten Grotenhuis, my manager is a big help. My collaborator, Exxy, the vocalist on Divine, is an amazing and talented artist who supports my music all of the time.

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Tell us your preferred musical styles.

I love Future Bass, Pop, Dubstep, Classical, and melodic music.

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List the name of five artists that have influenced you.

ODESZA, Illenium, Slander, Disero, Au5.

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Tell us your recording experience in the studio.

I try to head into the studio with a plan of what and how I’m going to record. I usually then go through many, many takes until I have the perfect sound.

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Discuss your experience with the music industry.

The music industry is tough. It’s hard to break into. The main key that I’ve learned is connecting with as many industry individuals as possible. The more people you know; the better.

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Explain vocal training.

Vocal training is the key to success for any vocalist attempting to breakthrough. Practicing every day will be essential.

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Discuss live instruments for recording in the studio.

Recording with live instruments is always a fun task. Unlike a synthesizer, you will always get a different and unique take, each time. I love how you can start with one idea, and then come out with a completely different one.

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Discuss your songwriting.

Songwriting is almost in a way, the same as producing. You compose an instrumental while creating emotion and theme. Then you portray that emotion with words. It’s all about creating a catchy melody.

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Tell us your other talents apart from producing.

I play the piano classically. I also create all of my own album artwork, website design, and merchandise. I love graphic design.

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Tell us your plans in terms of your music career.

At the moment, I’m producing and collaborating with as many artists as I can. I plan to release 5 singles and an EP by the end of 2019. I would love to start booking shows eventually and getting in front of a live audience.

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Tell us the worst experience in your music career.

At the very start of my music career, I had signed a “manager” and paid him up front, and then he ended up doing absolutely nothing for me and disappeared without contact.

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Discuss your music career in details.

My music career started professionally about two years ago when I signed my first manager. I have released two projects thus far, and have many more planned for 2019.

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Discuss your song and album.

‘Divine’ is my debut single. It is a collaboration with the artist, Exxy. It is an emotional track heavily inspired by the artist, ODESZA. It portrays the extreme, “divine” love between two people.

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Tell us what fans are saying pertaining to your music.

Fans seem to really enjoy my music. Different people relate to each track differently which I enjoy. I’m glad people from all different places can find love in my sound.

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Elaborate on your music project.

My music project is ever-changing and progressing and growing. I am branching out and working with more and more artists while growing daily.

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Discuss multi-genre and switching from one genre to another.

I believe in multi-genre. HiCONiK is all about creating different genres, creating new genres, and expanding into many different types of music.

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Explain the title of the song.

The name “Divine” came from the hook of the song. “We are Divine.”

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State the reason you are into music. 

Music has always been my passion. I listen to music from the second I awake until I head to sleep at night. The fact that I am lucky enough to have the ability to create it myself is unbelievable.

 

Mobile Version

Witold Suryn – Arpetition

 

Witold Suryn – Arpetition

 

ARTIST NAME: Witold Suryn

 

SONG TITLE: Arpetition

 

ALBUM TITLE: 34 Dance St.

 

RELEASE DATE: 2019-04-08

 

GENRE: Electronic/Contemporary Jazz

 

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Witold Suryn is a Canadian composer, pianist, bassist, and music producer.

 

Formally educated in music (piano) he composes music for over 40 years, first in jazz, then in contemporary symphonic and movie scores genre.

 

In addition to his formal musical education and years of composition practice in classical music, he gathered considerable experience in movie scoring for the contemporary film industry.

 

In his work, he cooperated with several young North American and British directors scoring their short and mid-length productions.

 

Independently he continuously composes music for cinema or TV productions, releases albums in symphonic, jazz and recently in electronic genres.

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Narrate your experience while recording in the studio or while touring.

I record all in my studio. If I write jazz scores all are practically live recorded, my instruments are directly connected to my DAW with no use of microphones, so at least one problem is avoided, the background noises.

 

I play most of the instruments and eventually add final drums later.

 

When I have other musicians participating; they either come to my studio and I am a recording engineer or I send the project and they record their parts with their DAWs and send me the material to be used in mixing.

 

When it comes to cinematic or symphonic scores the process is different – I write notes on staves, sometimes record them live, but still, the process resembles the classical composition with partition and pen, except partition resides in notation software and mouse is a pen. Once the composition is finished it goes to DAW where “recording” takes place, i.e. MIDI data is sent to libraries and the resulting audio is recorded in situ.

 

Live recording, when there are no mikes used, is relatively straight forward when the studio has a decent audio interface, powerful enough computer and proper DAW software.

 

Recording in loops, comping and some other smart technical tricks shorten the recording time but may make the mixing time considerably longer.

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Discuss your songwriting.

Being a piano player with formal musical education I use it as a tool, not as a set of rigid rules. So the music builds itself as I hear it, no matter whether it builds following the craft rules or against them.

 

My composition process follows what I hear, sometimes I have a complete vision of what I will write, and sometimes it resembles building the stairs when I figure out what the next step will be just before finishing the actual one. But one thing remains constant, the need for telling the story. Without it, my music would have no soul.

 

Being of an old school I use notes, partitions, and piano as a basic set of tools, but to create the sound I use notation software, many different instrument libraries and later in the process the mixing and mastering capabilities of my studio.

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Elaborate on your future projects.

Future goals are the same as the present ones: compose music and make it reach people. Make them like it, or hate it, but never bore them.

 

And, if possible, have my music played by others.

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Tell us what you are doing to increase your fan base.

I work with several publishing houses, a few distributors and radio stations.

 

For now, working with radio gives the best and the fastest results.

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Tell us that point in time you wanted to give up on your music career.

Actually, it never happened; I only had to decide off what I want to make a living. In my times making a living out of music meant either being a professional musician, in my case a professional pianist, or playing a popular genre of music. Nothing appealed to me, so I decided to keep the music free from the obligation of feeding me and chose other domain as the source of income. This decision gave me the freedom of creation and freedom to say “no” when requested options were not to my liking.

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Go into detail on how you make your instrumentation or melody.

The two of them are closely linked and interdependent. Melody goes with the choice of musical message to be conveyed, orchestration is a conveyer.

 

For example, when composing a piece of my More Cities Trilogy, Auberge Under the Wild Bear that takes place in Swiss Alps I chose, besides of classic symphonic orchestra setup the instruments that easily go with the type of music played in this region, an accordion, a solo tuba, a bass drum, a fiddle, a solo trumpet (or cornet) and a human voice able to yodel. Such a setup would be useless if I decided to compose a rock song.

 

In other words, a melody is a story; the instrumentation is the language you tell the story with. Both of them need to be chosen properly if the message is to pass.

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State your favourite genre of music.

In this order: cinematic scores, symphonic orchestral pieces, jazz.

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Tell us the theme of most of your songs.

There is no such thing like “theme of most of my songs”. Every piece I have ever composed or will compose has its own story to tell and they are never the same.

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Elaborate on this song.

“Arpetition” is an attempt to mix jazz, electronica, and a little bit easier listening into one, digestible piece.

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Tell us your opinion on self-training and enrolling in an educational institution to study music.

Music is a complex and delicate matter with bigger power of influence than we dare admit. This is why I am of the opinion that both proper education and intelligent practice, or, if you will, the self-training is necessary to create something of value.

 

Today’s technology gave into hands of pretty much everyone tools to build meaningful sequences of sounds, but is it “music”?

 

The DJ’s creation of dull bass pumping is definitely a good start for a disco where people dance, but would we go to a concert hall to listen to it? I have my doubts. No matter the genre all of them have their fans, listeners and followers, so they are necessary, but not all of them require music education to exist. But again, Mozart will be remembered forever while DJ X will go to oblivion next season.

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State your artist’s name and elaborate on it.

My artist name is my real name and I like it that way.

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State the title of the song and the meaning.

“Arpetition” is a “mission statement” for this piece. The name is built as a combination of two words: arpeggio and repetition. The listener will easily find that there is a lot of both in the music.

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State the title of the album and the reason for choosing the title.

The album title, “34 Dance St.” comes from the title of its first piece. The title piece is in 3/4 Metrum with several danceable moments despite being entirely jazz, so 34 Dance St. seemed more than adequate for the title of the piece and the album.

 

Mobile Version

Lindsey Stirling – Underground

Lindsey Stirling – Underground

 

Lindsey Stirling – Underground

Lindsey Stirling – Underground

 

Lindsey Stirling – Underground

 

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Acclaimed and multi-award winning electronic violinist Lindsey Stirling has released a brand new music video for her new single entitled “Underground” through all digital and streaming platforms.

 

The new song will be part of Stirling’s expected fifth studio album, Artemis, which releases everywhere Friday, September 6th through BMG.

 

Featuring Stirling’s signature brand of violin-driven, electronic music, “Underground” marks a new chapter for the music impresario. Tackling themes of overcoming difficulties, and fighting through life’s downfalls to reclaim one’s happiness and strength, Stirling tells the story of Artemis, Goddess of the Moon, and draws parallels to her own personal experiences. The track’s new music video included this theme.

 

Set in a dark futuristic-world, the video opens with Stirling tethered to restraints as she plays the violin.

 

Artemis appears amidst a bright moon, shedding light on the futuristic world, giving Stirling the strength to break free of her restraints.

 

Stirling further expands on Artemis – “One of the best examples of perseverance is the moon. Time and time again she gets covered in shadow and if one didn’t know better, it would sometimes seem as though she ceased to exist. There have been times of my life where I have felt completely overcome by the shadow of grief or depression; I felt like I’d never feel full happiness again. But the moon has taught me a powerful lesson. Just because she gets covered in shadow doesn’t mean she isn’t still there… and that she won’t fight back to reclaim her full light. Artemis is the goddess of the moon. This album tells her story; it tells my story; I think it tells everyone’s story.”

 

Beginning this summer, Stirling will embark on tours in both Europe and Mexico.

 

The international dates will begin on August 10th where she’ll perform in front of an impressive 10,500 fans for a sold-out show at the Sports Palace in Mexico City. Other major European cities include Frankfurt, Munich, Milan, Krkow, Warsow, Berlin, Zurich, and London.

 

“Underground” is available now through all digital and streaming platforms. Artemis will release wide, Friday, September 6th. Lindsey plays London’s Hammersmith Apollo on October 14th (for tickets, head to Website.)

 

Mobile Version

Hendrix - Dispirited

Hendrix – Dispirited

 

Hendrix - Dispirited

Hendrix – Dispirited

 

Artist Name: Hendrix

 

Song Title: Dispirited

 

Release Date:  6/25/2019

 

Genre: Indie Electronic/Electronic Pop

 

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Discuss how you find the sounds that fit your vocals.

I experiment.  I usually find the sounds and work the vocals in.

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Tell us how you come up with ideas to create your lyrics.

I think I’m a little bit different from other artists on how they create the music.  For me, the music creates the lyrics.  The music puts me in a mood.  I derive emotion from the mood, and then put the emotion in a setting.

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Tell us how you ensure the music producer balances your vocals with the instrumentals properly.

The mix is always fluid.  I think because of my unorthodox style of writing and developing the music, it can be difficult to find the balance.  I feel we’ve done a really good job with ‘Dispirited’ and the other songs that can be found on the website.

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Discuss the recording process of this song.

I start all the songs on acoustic guitar and then move them to the computer in my home studio.  Once I’ve figured out the “canvas”, I move it to a studio to add the analog and vocals.

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Tell us your experience recording the vocals.

I don’t sing…I wish I did, but I wasn’t blessed with the gift.  I’ve been blessed with working with some very talented vocalists as is the case with ‘Dispirited’ where Katie Shorey lent her amazing gift.

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Tell us how you ensure your songs sound well.

It’s a process.  We mix…I take them home and listen and listen and listen…make notes and bring back to the studio.  It can go quick or slow.

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State the best means of generating income in today’s music business.

Generating income at an independent level is extremely hard.  Having access to social media, internet, etc. helps to some extent.  I think it’s having a unique vibe to your offering.  I’m hoping that through the video series I’m creating on the website will allow a visual presence as well.

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State the people involved in creating this song and their roles.

I wrote and laid down the instrumentation for ‘Dispirited.’  Katie Shorey provided the beautiful vocals.  Robert Eibach from Del Oro Studios engineered, mixed and helped with the production of the song.

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Explain how you get involved in music.

I’ve been around music all my life.  My parents always played various instruments while I was growing up.  I always wanted to do something with music no matter how large or small.

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State your favourite song and the reason.

It’s hard to state a favourite song because that varies with my emotions.  If I’m happy, I like more upbeat music.  If I’m down, I like more solace vibes.  I’m all over the place.

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Tell us your opinion on the use of digital effects on vocals.

I like using effects on vocals.  I look at vocals like any other instrument.  I think you can be creative with them, but again, you can have too much…just like any other instrument.

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Explain the relevance of creativity to music.

I think it’s important to be creative in all aspects of art.

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Tell us the steps to take before going into the studio to record.

As mentioned earlier, I like to have a song ready to go before I record.  I have the “canvas” ready and then put the colours on in the studio.

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Tell us what you know about your fans.

 They have good taste in music!

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Tell us if you see music as a rewarding career.

I don’t see music as a career…I see music as a necessity for my sanity.

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Tell us what you will do apart from music.

My family is my other focus apart from music.  I love them dearly.

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Tell us if you will prefer to watch a movie to listening to music.

I like both mediums and it also depends on my mood.  However, there’s nothing like going on a long drive with a great playlist.

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Elaborate on the song.

‘Dispirited’ is a rather obvious song.  It’s about a love breakup and the pain that goes with it.

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Elaborate on your artist name and the title of the album.

Hendrix, fortunately enough, is my last name.  I would be a liar if I said I wasn’t trying to capitalize on the familiarity of the name.  On top of that, I like the logo that was created to go with the name as well.

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Mobile Version

Brother Zulu – Fine!

Brother Zulu – Fine

 

Brother Zulu – Fine!

Brother Zulu – Fine!

 

Artist Name – Brother Zulu

 

Song Title – Fine!

 

Channeling fast lane fever, Brother Zulu weave a genre-bending, soul-quenching banger with their latest release “Fine!”

 

With a production as equally greasy as the vocals that line the top, it’s an anthem for anyone who’s ever received an ‘invoice of the law’!

 

Inspired by a particularly egregious driving penalty, the song encompasses the cacophony of frustration, incomplete rationale and pure fire breathing anger expressed when receiving a fine.

 

Parodying on the tired trope of pointlessly shoehorning female objectification into pop song lyrics, the chorus is a wild mix of bass-heavy grime, James Brown era funk and UK garage, interspersed within hyperactive verses that dart between John Mayer, Blade Runner and Miguel Atwood-Ferguson as influences.

 

Produced by Brother Zulu’s Lawrence Ajadi, mixed by Jonas Westling and pushed hard in mastering by John Webber, Brother Zulu brings you its latest genre taster dish.

 

Brother Zulu

At a raucous, out of hand 150-person house party near Hammersmith, Brother Zulu performed their very first gig to an inebriated audience of budding scientists, engineers and medic students.

 

Their eclectic setlist, wild genre jumps and spellbound audience set the tone for what was to come from the London natives.

 

The band’s members have border-crossing tastes: 1970s soul brought on by lead singer Max Tuohy meets a jazz essence embodied by guitarist Alex Hillman; the back catalogue of rare groove and funk that inspires bassist Noah Nelson meets the heavier hip-hop and rock grooves of drummer Youssef Abdelkhalek.

 

Combining the many elements of Brother Zulu is a production style as unique as its varied members, curated by versatile producer, keys player and classically trained flautist Lawrence Ajadi.

 

The band has received support as an Unsigned Music Award nominee, ILUVLIVE Hotlist artist and BBC Artist of the Week while catching the eye of tastemakers such as Tom Robinson, Gaby Roslin, Shell Zenner and Spotify editorial playlists New Hip-Hop and R&B and Monday Spin.

 

If 2018 was the year that saw the band go public with their soulful crooner “Honey”, a sold out Camden Assembly show, performances on national radio and the BBC’s Biggest Weekend, then 2019 holds high expectations for the group with their spring release of “Fine!” and the first look at a set of ‘trilogy’ EPs coming through for later in the year.

 

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Mobile Version

Sancii + Drona - Space

Sancii + Drona – Space

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sancii + Drona - Space

Sancii + Drona – Space

 

 

 

 

 

 

ARTIST NAME:  Sancii + Drona

 

SONG TITLE:  Space

 

RELEASE DATE: 21.03.19

 

GENRE: Dance / Electronic

 

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Discuss your music career.

I started playing music in 2006 at the age of 16 as a DJ in France to Rabat and Varna to name a few.

 

During this period, I found myself playing with house and hip-hop favorites such as Laurent Wolf, DJ Snake, Big Ali, The Freshmakers and many others.

 

In 2017 I invented Sancii and came out with my first EP entitled ‘Night all day.’

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Discuss your recording experience.

I have been a DJ for five years and composer in the studio for four years.

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Discuss what comes first and last while creating a song.

First I develop the sound, and last I try to find a voice that comes close to my idea…

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Tell us the piece of advice you will give to a new artist.

To always be looking for a new sound.

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Discuss your worse experience in the music business.

Disappointments in general as nobody is on time, I am always on time.

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Tell us what you are promoting your songs.

I do a lot of promotion with Instagram.

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List the name of the producer you look up to musically.

I am a very big fan of Diplo and I like all his productions and collaboration…

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Tell us how you feel when fans sing your song.

That always makes me happy when I hear my music somewhere.

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Tell us the goals you aim to achieve when creating a song.

I just hope to make people happy with my music and I ensure it has something melodic.

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Tell us how you plan to develop a unique music style.

By testing new things every day, when I find something or a sound – I will I develop it day by day.

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Explain the recording process of the song.

I teamed up with Drona for the song – ‘Space.’ I composed the track with Ryan Egan while Ariel Loh mixed and then Chris Gehringer mastered it.

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Discuss your experience with fans.

I always have a good relationship with my fans.

 

Mobile Version

YBC Tha NeRd

YBC Tha NeRd

 

 

 

 

 

 

YBC Tha NeRd

YBC Tha NeRd

 

 

 

 

 

 

Artist Name – YBC Tha NeRd

 

Song Title – Work

 

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YBC Tha NeRd is an aspiring hip-hop artist who became the talk of town for his unique talent of combining hip-hop with EDM.

 

The YBC stands for “Young Brotha n Charge” – which is his stage name.

 

Born in the South Side of Chicago, Illinois, YBC later moved to the South Suburbs which was where he grew up.

 

YBC Tha NeRd currently resides in North America in Indiana, but he still represents Chicago with all his heart.

 

Although YBC’s music encircles more of a hip-hop approach, he likes to refer to himself as a nerd which is one of the things he loves about himself, and as his stage name suggests. A diehard lover of video games, TV shows, and even comics, YBC has pulled most of his topics and bars from these things.

 

Moreover, the nerd in YBC happens to be an aficionado of science as well, and so, you are likely to hear a little bit of science with a mix of personal experiences, and in some songs, even politics. If that wasn’t enough, YBC Tha NeRd is also a lover of universal vibration and frequency, which he uses to write his lyrics and record his music.

 

For the future, YBC intends to add some history and culture into his music as well.

 

Belonging to the genre of hip-hop and EDM, YBC has a lot of big plans for the near future.

 

He grew up listening to artists such as MC Hammer, Crucial Conflict, The Isley Brothers, Kenny G, Luther Vandross and Sade. These artists helped shape YBC’s love for music and he always had a passion to return the same energy back.

 

His shows are normally highly energetic with crisp sounds and proper performance tracks.

 

YBC’s latest release is titled “Van Gogh” which is his third single.

 

His work has often times been compared to the likes of Flosstradamus and Futuristic, and “like something a major EDM DJ would make”, and YBC himself prefers to compare his work to Mickey Factz and Lupe.

 

Currently, YBC is focusing his time on recording his EP for a summer release, as well as a winter album release, all the while taking the opportunity to book shows any and everywhere.

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Tell us how you build up the tune for this song.

This was a collaboration with an EDM duo named Electro Riot. I needed something with the right energy to match what I was saying.

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Tell us the best means of becoming a famous artist and selling more records.

Well I’m not there yet, but I’ll definitely let you know once I get there.

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Tell us how fans are reacting to your music.

This is my biggest song to date – with over 100k spins on Spotify.

 

I get great feedback on this song all the time. People like I how I mixed EDM with hip hop.

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Explain how to deal with fear on stage.

You have to set that aside and perform as if you were in the booth. Remember the feeling you want to get across and act on that.

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Tell us your point of view on the quality of production of today’s songs to old songs and point out what you think has changed.

The production quality is still great. But I think a lot of new music lacks live instruments.

 

Old school tracks had real drums, bass guitar, and horns.

 

I think live instruments would only help make a song better.

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Tell us how you come across the lyrics of this song.

We’ll as u can tell by my name I’m a nerd. So I draw inspiration from anime, TV shows, comics, video games and movies. I take all that and turn that into the fuel and punchlines or metaphors that I use.

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Tell us your opinion on using music to deliberate on issues affecting people like corruption, immoralities, politics and religion.

Music will always be the best way to get these pints across. All throughout time music has given a voice to the under-privileged and forgotten.

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Discuss how you plan to create a timeless music that your fans can cherish forever.

By just being myself, staying true to what I know and what my fans like.

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List the names of individuals you can point out as legends and state your reasons.

Lupe Fiasco, Daylyt, Mickey Factz – just based on the bars. All of them have amazing wordplay and depth.

 

Kanye west – because of his musicality and the way he produces.

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Tell us your viewpoint on discriminating.

Discriminating against anyone or anything is bad. But with this internet generation everyone gets to voice their opinion to the public and it allows for this to be misconstrued and misrepresented.

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Tell us your favourite books and state your reason.

The 48 Laws of Power: very in-depth book about people and personalities – how people interact with each other, and how one should interact with a certain type of person.

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Tell us what triggers your creativity.

A ton of different things – sometimes it’s certain beat.

 

Sometimes I’m watching TV and see a special move from a character and I start spinning that in to bars.

 

Or a video game makes me think how I can flip this into a song.

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Tell us how you generate musical ideas for your composition.

I base that on things going on in my personal life or in the world or what I think would be dope to talk about.

 

I try to keep my options open to all new ideas because something may hit you while you are shopping.

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Tell us your greatest song and state the reason.

My greatest song is not available and may not even be written yet. I’m getting better every time I write and create. So stay tuned.

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Tell us how you compose your song.

Sometimes the lyrics are first sometimes the beat is first. Just depends on if I’m writing alone or if a producer has sent me a beat ahead of time.

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Elaborate on the song.

The song is about getting up and putting in the work to be where you want to be. The work may not be what you want to do at the time but it needs to be done in order to get to where you want to actually be.

 

Sometimes people get too complacent with where they are and they forgot about the dreams that they had of where they want to be. So you have to get up off your ass and get it done.

 

And if you see your friends, family or partners around you not putting in the work that they need to do then you tell them to get up and get it done.

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Elaborate on your artist name and the title of the album.

My name is YBC Tha NeRd. YBC stands for Young Brotha n Charge.

 

Mobile Version

Urchin – Something Outta Nothing

Urchin – Something Outta Nothing

 

 

 

 

 

 

Urchin – Something Outta Nothing

Urchin – Something Outta Nothing

 

 

 

 

 

SONG TITLE: Something Outta Nothing

 

ALBUM TITLE: Take Time

 

RELEASE DATE: 22.02.19

 

GENRE: Downtempo, Electronic

 

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Tell us your real names, country of birth and childhood experience.

Leo Appleyard. I was born in Kingston, South West London.

 

I grew up playing jazz at school aged 13, with some amazing musicians and mentors. It was an inspiring place / time to be playing music. I started on Piano and Guitar. I stated gigging with the musicians I met at school around the age of 15.  This led to a tour of Ireland at 17 with a 10 piece funk band.

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Tell us your academic qualification.

I have studied jazz guitar formally at the Royal Academy of Music, London, and the Royal Birmingham Conservatoire, Birmingham. I have a BMus (Hons) in jazz guitar.

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Elaborate on your music career, band name, experience and skills.

Having mainly played jazz and associated genres for a long time, I became interested in sounds that couldn’t be created by acoustic instruments… i.e. from synths and computers. This led me to creating the band ‘Urchin’ in late 2014 – originally a half-way-house between a jazz band and an electronic dance band. It had 8 members and we gigged around London in 2015/16, including a show at the London Jazz Festival.

 

The band name was a tough one to come up with, lots of arguments…. then we recorded our first EP at Urchin Studios in Hackney… and the name kind of stuck with me.

 

These days I produce electronic music from my studio in SW London, on an Island in the Thames. The Spice Girls recorded their original demos here and I like to think that the spirit of their music influences my writing…… haha maybe not.

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Tell us your genre and idea behind your music video or song.

I love UK garage and wanted to write a moody garage-influenced track. “Something Outta Nothing” came from a gospel vocal sample I had on a hard drive.

 

I like the lyric as it sums up my creative process…. I open a blank project and create something out of nothing.

 

I guess it fits into that downtempo / electronic scene that Bonobo and Maribou State have paved the way for.

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Tell us how to run a record label based on your experience as an artist.

I signed my first album which was a jazz album, in 2014 and it was great experience. F-IRE records were really easy to deal with and helped me out.

 

To be honest, I don’t know if you need a label now with Spotify for artists and all of those services… I’d certainly be happy to talk with any labels who like my music though.

Ideally for me, a label would get involved with the music promotion side of it.

 

Distribution is so easy these days.

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Tell us how you are promoting your music.

That is a big topic right now, usually discussed down the pub with other musicians at great length. I have all the usual social media channels on the go, as well as contacting blogs and playlist curators. Lots of emails!

 

We are launching the EP with a show at the Finsbury on 12th March.

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Share your press release and reviews with us.

“If you love Bonobo or Submotion Orchestra, you will want to hear these guys.”

– HiddenHerd.com

 

“One of the new crop of jazz musicians, making a mark on the scene…”

– Julian Joseph, BBC Radio 3

 

Leo Appleyard is a musician and producer from South-West London, releasing music under the name “Urchin”.

 

Originally an ambitious 8-piece band that performed at the London Jazz Festival and venues around London, Urchin now represents the sonic output forged in a secluded island studio, once home to the ‘spice girls’ in the early 90s.

In 2018, Leo took a break from life as gigging musician and escaped to the progressive music scene of Melbourne, Australia.

Taking in the mix of house, disco and modern jazz from the northern districts of Fitzroy and Brunswick – ‘Take Time’ EP (release date 1st March 2019) is the reflection of that time spent in a creative zone, in a new scene whilst underpinned by the narrative of UK producers Bonobo, Maribou State and The Cinematic Orchestra.

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Explain the story behind the song.

“Something Outta Nothing” came from my love of garage music but also a desire to create something moody.

I found the vocal sample and it came together over a few days.

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State the names of other members of your band, music producer, crew or music video director.

The band lineup changes from gig to gig but on the EP:

Grace Walker – Vocals

Leo Appleyard – Backing Vocals/Guitars/Programming

Paul Jordanous – Trumpet

Live Show adding:

 

Chris Nickolls – Drums

 

Holley Gray – Bass

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Tell us how long you have been in the music business, your experience and your future goal.

I’ve been gigging since I was 15, so 13 years in the business now.

 

As a freelance guitarist I have been lucky to play all over the world.

 

Recently I’ve been concentrating on producing – recently for Cat Delphi – and my own writing.

 

I want to develop the live show and tour!

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Tell us what makes you unique from others.

Coming from such an in depth jazz background to electronic music adds a different dimension. I like weird chords.

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Tell us your weakness and strength pertaining music.

I have a tendency to over-cook ideas.

 

I think speed is an advantage when producing.

 

Strength – I like really strong coffee in the studio, really strong.

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List your five favourite songs including the artists. 

Bonobo – Break Apart

 

Flume – Holdin On

 

The Cinematic Orchestra – All Things To All Men

 

Beatenberg – Ithica

 

Christopher Cross – Ride like the Wind

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Tell us your position on “Do It Yourself” and signing to a major label.

Both have their place. I think doing it yourself means you hold the cards. If you have curated your fan base yourself, no one can take that away.

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Tell us other activities you are pursuing apart from music.

Running and drinking beer – in that order.

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State the official date of release. 

22.02.19 – Something Outta Nothing – Single Release

01.03.19 – Take Time EP full release

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State your artist’s name and elaborate on it.

Urchin – don’t step on one!

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State the title of the song and the meaning.

“Something Outta Nothing” – I like how so much can be created out of very little.

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State the title of the album and the reason for choosing the title. 

“Take Time” – because it’s taken me bloody ages to get this out! …. Only joking, I’ve explored some different time signatures on this EP and Grace Walker came up with the lyric. It works for me.

 

 

 

 

Mobile Version