Juhan Ongbrian - Mood Swings

Juhan Ongbrian – Mood Swings

 

 

 

 

 

 

Juhan Ongbrian - Mood Swings

Juhan Ongbrian – Mood Swings

 

 

 

 

 

 

Artist Name:  Juhan Ongbrian + Ech0 + Sly Chong

 

Song Title:  Mood Swings

 

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Juhan Ongbrian brings to light a brand new song entitled ‘Mood Swings featuring Ech0 and Sly Chong.

 

More!

Experimental jazz; jazz fusion; electro-jazz… however you wish to classify it, the pioneering artists taking jazz to the brand new audiences are some of the biggest stories in recent years, taking music which had fallen out of fashion into something which brought together people across generations, cultural backgrounds, and class.

 

Entering the field is Juhan Ongbrian who brings his guitar and production skills to life which has seen him take influence from his birthplace in Indonesia, through to a prolonged stay in Seattle and to his base in Los Angeles.

 

Mobile Version

Tony Marino – Sam’s

Tony Marino – Sam’s

 

Tony Marino – Sam’s

Tony Marino – Sam’s

 

Artist – Tony Marino

 

Song Title – Sam’s

 

Genre – Jazz

 

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Tony Marino is a Latin jazz pianist, composer, and recording engineer based in Ft. Wayne, Indiana.

 

The artist fell in love with music at an early age. At just 7-years old he started playing piano and has been hooked ever since.

 

In his early days, Tony was inspired by the iconic Leon Russell and strove to become professional pianist, composer, and performer.

 

Tony started studying piano with Bill DelGovenatore. This is where Tony’s journey into the world of jazz began. Bill introduced Tony to the jazz genre and even introduced him to famous artists such as Thelonious Monk. This was a true turning point for Tony, and the start of his immersion into jazz and Latin inspired music.

 

While studying, Tony was making ends meet working in a music store. This store became foundational to Tony’s immersion into the music scene. For instance, he developed connections with famous jazz musicians such as Al Stauffer and Frank DiBussolo. Eventually, Bill introduced Tony to Tom Lawton who became Tony’s final mentor and piano tutor.

 

In 1974, Tony was the keyboardist for a Philadelphia Italian-American band called Idea ’71. However, Tony left the group to continue his education. After that, he relocated to Ft. Wayne, Indiana.

 

After this significant life change, Tony was able to discover a tight and warm jazz community in his brand new hometown. It was there that Tony formed Tony Marino and Havana Heat. This talented and seasoned group of musicians became regulars on the live music circuit. They performed at clubs, venues, festivals, and private events.

 

In 1997, Tony released his debut album “Tony Marino & Havana Heat: The Latin Jazz Project.” The music from this project was featured heavily on local radio such as WBNI FM. This release launched Tony Marino into the spotlight and onto the national stage.

 

The band had later changed their name to Tony Marino’s Latin Jazz Sounds. While leading this band, Tony also released four albums and published the songbook The Latin Jazz Project. During this time, Tony freely explored diverse Latin inspired genres such as samba, bossa nova, and calypso.

 

Eventually, Tony relocated to Jersey and then on to Santa Barbara for a handful of years.

 

In California, Tony attended jazz jam sessions and played with a variety of established artists such as Jeff Elliot, and Rene Martinez, to mention but a few. No matter where he traveled, Tony always carried his passion and love for music with him. He was able to quickly develop bonds and relationships in the jazz scene on a national level.

 

The composer /artist has released an impressive eleven albums over his 20-year career. Tony is the sole creative mind behind his projects and is responsible for writing, composing, and producing his own original music.

 

Tony’s releases have always been greeted with critical acclaim and approval from his fans. What makes Tony stand out in the industry is that he is able to captivate and connect with jazz enthusiasts and novices alike.

 

His music is accessible and thrilling, gaining him a loyal following of avid fans and admirers from around the world.

 

The best part of it is that Tony shows no signs of slowing down! He has two upcoming releases that are due to hit the shelves this year.

 

In his own words, “I am dedicated to becoming a better musician and creating original music.” After listening to his releases it’s immediately apparent that Tony is a passionate and skilled musician with raw talent.

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Discuss how you develop your melody.

For this particular song “Sam’s” the melody was developed reminiscing about how the day would progress working at Sam D’Amico’s Music store in South Philly during the mid-’70s.

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Tell us your source of inspiration.

During my freshman year attending Bishop Neumann High School in South Philadelphia, I started working at Sam D’Amico’s Music store. This played a significant role in my musical development.

 

While working at Sam’s, I started studying piano with Bill DelGovenatore, I met drummer Joe Pagano who recruited me to play in a local Philadelphia Italian American Wedding Band “Idea 71”.

 

While working at Sam’s I met many musicians such as Frank DiBussolo, Ron Nocella, Carl Mottola, Ron Tempesta, Al Stauffer, Tom Lawton, and many others.  Eventually, I had to resign from Sam’s because of my busy school and gigging schedule.

 

Many of the musicians helped me and I also met many of the people who lived in the area who were interested in music. It was a great time. I miss those days and all of the people at the store. Unfortunately, Sam, Al, and Carl have passed. All of the events were the inspiration and dedication of this song.

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Tell us the most memorable experience in your music career.

I have been very lucky and have had many memorable experiences – Meeting, studying and playing with many musicians who I admire. The one of that stands out was when my family and I went to a jazz festival and Claudio Roditi called me out of the audience, and I got to play with Claudio Roditi and Marvin Stamm. It was unexpected and went very well.

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Discuss how you build your song.

Every song is different, and it really depends on what the inspiration is for the piece I am working on. Sometimes it may start with a rhythmic phrase, a chord progression or a melodic idea. I write a lot and I do not use a set process to compose a song.

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Tell us how you ensure your music inspires others.

I am inspired by people, situations, places, etc… I believe that people relate to the music that has been inspired by them.

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Discuss the relevance of promotion to the music business.

Getting the music to new people is the key. We have dedicated listeners since I released my first CD as a leader “Tony Marino & Havana Heat the Latin Jazz Project” in 1997.

 

We have been successful in getting people who normally do not listen to jazz interested in jazz.

 

Latin Jazz is special because the rhythm gets people’s attention and keeps them interested in listening.

 

Getting music to new people is a big challenge and is important to the survival of this music.

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Tell us what you will do apart from music.

After many years of working, going to school and working on music, I am focused solely on my music career.

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List the names of the instruments you can play.

I play the piano. I arrange and write music for all instruments.

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Tell us if you have any music background.

I am the only musician in my family. I have been studying music since I was 7 years old.

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Tell us the piece of advice you will give to a new artist on entering the music chart.

Make sure you learn everything you can about music, the music business and make sure you have a second career.

 

Always be persistent, professional, polite and on time. You also have to know when to start and stop projects.

 

Stay away from drugs and alcohol and play with people who are better than you – If you are ever in a situation where you are over your head; work hard to pull yourself to the next level.

 

Listen to common criticisms about your playing and work to get better.

 

Stay away from trouble and never play for free unless you are going to a jam session.

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Elaborate on melody and rhythm.

The rhythm defines the type of song and it is important to understand what rhythms are related to the genre of music you are playing.

 

The harmony and melody need to be understood. In creating music, it is important to know the rules and when you need to follow them.

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State your future goals.

I am dedicated to practicing, writing, recording original music. Currently, I am working on a CD that is going to be released in 2020 and a few other projects that will be released in the future.

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Share your recording experience with us.

During the summer of 1976, in between my freshman and sophomore years in high school, Michele “Mike” Elia the Saxophonist I played with, in the band Idea 71″ recorded an album, at Frank Virtue’s Recording Studios, in North Philadelphia.

 

During the sessions, Mike wanted to rent an alto saxophone to use on this recording. At that time, I was working at Sam’s music store.  I called Sam and asked him if he had an alto saxophone that Mike could use. Sam had two, a brand-new Selmer and an off-brand that wasn’t in the best shape; Sam agreed to rent the Selmer for $75 dollars and the other for $15 dollars.

 

We were a little tight on money so Mike chose the $15 option. While we were recording the first song I heard a few clicking sounds followed by a loud voice screaming “Mother… – it fell apart.” Everyone including Mike started laughing.

 

While Mike was playing, the saxophone parts fell off and we weren’t able to finish the session. It was a little frustrating because he was still paying for studio time.

 

We called Sam and he cut Mike a break on renting the Selmer. After we finished recording during the mixing phase, we were in the control listening to the mix. It was early in the morning we were really tired. All of the playbacks were at a comfortable volume level just as I started to doze off this very loud scream “Mother…- it fell apart.” overpowered the music. Everyone started laughing.

 

One of the tracks had Mike’s famous vocal track that never made it to vinyl. The album was instrumental.

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Tell us the most difficult part of a recording.

The toughest thing for me is to relax and not worry about making mistakes.

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Discuss the greatest mistake you have ever made in your music career.

There were a few times when I should have put business before personal feelings.

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Tell us how you build up your composition.

Each song is different. Depending on how the idea starts; the melody, harmony, and rhythm work hand in hand and that will define the finished product.

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Discuss the relevance of music.

Music is one of the most important elements of all societies. It is used in every aspect of life. It connects people and is the universal language of our planet.

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Elaborate on the song.

The song was inspired during my employment at Sam D’Amico’s music store.

 

The song represents the cycle of a day working at the store. It starts out with the rhythm section and the Marimbas playing the melody.

 

Parts of the melody are played by the vibes, flute, steel pans and marimbas along with the improvisation that is done on the piano.

 

The instruments represent the different customers, music students, delivery personnel, music teachers and the events that occurred throughout the day.

 

Each day started out and ended almost the same way, each day was slightly different because there were different music teachers and students depending on the day’s schedule.

 

It was a great meeting place and I have many fond memories of all the people I met, worked with and learned from during the early stages of my music career.

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Elaborate on your artist name and the title of the album.

I was named after my father Anthony Gaetano Marino Sr. My dad was called Tony and people called me Anthony to avoid confusion.

 

When I started working people started calling me Tony and after my Dad passed away when I was 16 people referred to me as Tony and it is the name I use.

 

The album title “Family and Friends” is my dedication to all of the people that matter to me my “Family and Friends”.

 

Mobile Version

Antonio Orrico - Urban Legends

Antonio Orrico – Urban Legends

 

 

 

 

 

 

Antonio Orrico - Urban Legends

Antonio Orrico – Urban Legends

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Antonio Orrico – Urban Legends

 

Artist Name – Antonio Orrico

 

Song Title – Urban Legends

 

Album Title – Urban Legends

 

Genre – Jazz

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Antonio Orrico is an Italian guitarist, educator and composer. He currently lives with his family in Johannesburg South Africa.

 

Over the years he has been involved as a session player and composer for some of the top South African TV Shows and Adverts as well as performing with many local and international artists.

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Go into detail on why you decided to choose music as a career.

I have always been a musician. I started at age 8 with the recorder, soon after then piano and finally upgraded to guitar at age 14. I know it sounds corny but I didn’t have to choose, music chose me.

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Brief us the feedback you are getting from fans on your music.

I was completely overwhelmed by the response of my fans. Upon release on the 22nd of December 2018, Urban Legends soared to #2 in the Top Selling Jazz Albums on Google Play Italy and stayed in the top 10 for over 5 weeks.

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Discuss the relevance of social networking to music.

We live in an exciting age for musicians; technology has broken down many barriers in so many ways.

 

Social media is definitely a major player in the success of a musician nowadays.

 

To build a following and connect with fans has become much easier than ever before.

 

I have been fortunate enough to be able to build a good following in the guitar community over the years, thanks to my education courses and that has definitely played a big part of the initial success of the album.

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Tell us how you record your song.

My recording process is very simple. I look for good melodies, chord structures or riffs then I write the back bone of the song midi in Logic.

 

Once I have a solid structure and I’m happy with the arrangements I call in a few friends and record a live rhythm section (Drums, Bass and Keys).

 

At last when I have everything ready I do all my mixing and mastering.

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Tell us the story behind the album.

I always wanted to release my own instrumental album, but being a working musician and jingle writer I’m always busy in the studio working on different projects.

 

Around August 2018, while I was going through my hard disk, I found a collection of unfinished songs that I have been writing over the past couple of years. It was like these songs were imploring me to finish them and give them life… I couldn’t resist.

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State your musical skills.

I’m a professional jazz / rock guitarist and jingle writer. I studied guitar with some great teachers in Italy, Bruno Marrazzo and Colombo Menniti, and arranging at the Berkeley College of Music.

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Tell us how long it takes to complete a song from the start.

I have produced jingles in just a few hours in the past, but for the songs on my albums things are different. It’s just the style that requires more attention to details and very often the support of live musicians. The whole process of writing, arranging, sessions, mixing and mastering can take easily three days.

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Go into detail on how you develop the melody.

Being an instrumental smooth jazz / blues album, the guitar is king and every note carries a lot of weight.

 

I normally would need a couple of hours to craft the perfect take and develop a strong melody for the verse, chorus and solos. Having said that I’m not always that pedantic, for some of the songs a few takes were enough to get what I was looking for.

 

In the end you want to keep it fresh and real as much as possible, over producing a take can kill the natural vibe of a song, especially in this genre.

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Discuss music in full details.

What you hear in Urban Legends is a mix of the different genres that I like to play: jazz, blues and rock. I am fascinated by modern music and sounds yet I always had a foot in the past if you know what I mean. I tried to keep that balance as much as I could in this work.

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State your five favourite genres of music with reasons.

I was born (musically) listening to the classic rock of the 60/70.

 

In my early teens my uncles would feed me Jethro Tull, Led Zeppelin and Deep Purple. I just loved the guitars and the whole raw vibe of those bands.

 

I was introduced to Fusion and Classic Jazz by my guitar teacher Bruno Marrazzo a few years later and that was also a big milestone for me as it opened my eyes to another world.

 

Playing guitar now meant much more than just the pentatonic scale and a few power chords. It was a great school for me; I learned a lot trying to play solos from Charlie Parker, Wes Montgomery, Pat Metheny, Mike Stern and so on.

 

As I started to play for a living I wanted to get into the session scene and there’s very little space for jazz there. That’s when I started going back to rock / pop and relearning how to keep it simple and straight to the point. Players like Dann Huff and Jerry McPherson were big influences at the time.

 

In the early 2000 I started building my home studio and wanted to develop my skills as a music composer / producer.

 

At that stage I was fascinated by movie scores and mood music for TV shows and started listening to artists like Hans Zimmer, Ennio Morricone, John Williams, Thomas Newman and still do.

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Discuss your rehearsal.

Getting ready for a tour or a show is so much fun when you have the right musicians. The key to a great performance is to do the prep work right, surround yourself with great musicians and give them the space they deserve.

 

I always have charts ready that I hand down before the rehearsal that saves us an enormous amount of time and resources. The last thing you want is to waste precious time learning the songs.

 

I cannot afford my own exclusive band and I to use session musicians. These guys are busy bees and I cannot expect them to spend hours of their time trying to figure out my songs. That gets everybody in a good state of mind and keeps it professional, we play a song a couple of times and we are ready to go.

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State your favourite musical instruments.

Guitar, keys and bass.

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Describe the chemistry between you and your fans during a live performance.

Always a good time.

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Discuss your music career.

Over the years he has been involved as a session player and composer for some of the top South African TV Shows and Adverts as well as performing with many local and international artists.

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List your musical work.

Here is a short list of some of the TV Shows and Jingles he has produced music for as well as some of the Multi-Platinum Artists he has had the pleasure to work with: McDonald, Knorr, MultiChoice, Emperor Palace, Jamali, Kabelo, Wian Vos, Liesl Graham, Louis Van Rensburg, Heintje Simons, Evan Schoombie, Anais, D-Rex (aka David Campos), SABC Sport, Woza 2010, 7de Laan, Top Billing, Wufukezele, Walk The Plank, L’at Wie…

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State the title of your favourite song in the album and the meaning.

Eternal Sunshine is my 10 years old daughter’s favourite track on the Urban Legends album. So I thought I would dedicate it to her, my Eternal Sunshine.

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State the title of the album and the reason for choosing the title.

I had Urban Legends in mind as an album’s title for a long time. The idea that fictional stories are believed as true by the people on the street has always fascinated me for some reason.

 

You know the expression “They say so” so must be true? Well doesn’t sit well with me. Some things are rooted in pop culture and yet no one can tell me who are “They”?

 

Being an instrumental album you have no lyrics to get inspiration for your titles. You only have the music, the moods and your imagination.

 

Mobile Version

Richard Ford - Calango Reco

Richard Ford – Calango Reco

 

 

 

 

 

 

Richard Ford - Calango Reco

Richard Ford – Calango Reco

 

 

 

 

 

 

ARTIST NAME: Richard Ford

 

SONG TITLE: Calango Reco

 

ALBUM TITLE: Basso Profondissimo

 

GENRE: Jazz, Bossa Nova, Ambient,

 

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State your reason for choosing music as a career.

I’ve been a musician all my life. I love music in its many forms – I was a professional musician for many years before working with music in film.

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Tell us how you write the lyrics to your song.

My music is instrumental or with scat vocals

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Discuss your music career and elaborate on the recording of this EP.

Emmy winner Richard Ford is a bass player, a music editor and executive music producer for film, he has worked with many Oscar winning film makers on such films as Sideways, Argo and Hidden Figures, formerly he was bass player with Joe Jackson and guitarist Bill Nelson.

 

Richard Ford’s Basso Profondissimo EP was recorded in Venice, California in the spring and summer of 2018.

 

The collection was conceived and played on bass, creating a unique and surprising melding of sounds and adding some rough edges to the genres of  jazz, ambient, bossa nova and neoclassical.

 

This is not a collection concerned with virtuosity; it’s about evoking moods and character, not about flash.

 

Sharing some of the same musical landscape as Sigur Rós, Lyle Mays, Bebel Gilberto, ECM Records and Bill Frisell, Basso Profondissimo employs a cinematic language, often minimal and evocative.

 

All of the tracks were executed on bass, multi-tracked and treated.

 

As Richard started to experiment with vocals (specifically the addition of the amazing Costa Rican vocalist Michelle Gonzalez) and new possibilities emerged — including a full-blown, fresh cover of George Duke’s Brazilian-influenced ‘Malibu’, which features a handful of world-class jazz musicians, among them renowned keyboardists Kait Dunton and Peter Gabriel alumnus Simon Clark.

 

The seeds of his EP Basso Profondissimo were sown in late-80s New York, where Richard had begun recording demos, and performing, exclusively with basses.

 

The project was put on hold when Richard moved to Los Angeles to work in film music.

 

Much of his work as a music editor involved reconstructing and remixing the work of others. While this has been creatively challenging, Richard felt “ the itch to get the basses out of the closet and create something that truly came from me.” Basso Profondissimo began to unfold.

 

These vast and varied influences have informed Richard’s work and shaped the rich diversity evident in Basso Profondissimo.

 

This signature collection is the culmination of Richard Ford’s extensive musical journey to date.

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Discuss your life outside the music world.

I live in Southern California – work in the film industry as music producer and editor.

 

Originally from the UK – I’ve lived in the U.S. for 30 years – Yes, I’m old! : )

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Elaborate more on your music career.

Born in London, Richard grew up in a musical family, immersed in the classics from an early age.

 

He began performing as a boy, in Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice’s choir.

 

His love of music eventually led to the bass, and he developed into an accomplished player.

 

He has toured and recorded with many artists, including the revered guitarist Bill Nelson (in his band Red Noise) and upon moving to the US, singer-songwriter Joe Jackson.

 

In New York, Richard discovered and embraced an ever-expanding world of music and culture — perhaps most significantly through his study of African and Afro-Caribbean music and dance. The rhythms he found there grew to become part of his musical DNA.

 

Richard moved to Los Angeles to work in film and film music. In that role, he has been an important member of director Alexander Payne’s creative team since 1998, earning credit as Executive Music Producer on their last three projects together (The Descendants, Nebraska and Downsizing).

 

As an Emmy winning music editor for film, he’s played a role in many successful productions, among them American History X, Training Day, Sideways, Argo, and Hidden Figures.

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Elaborate on your EP’s title.

‘Basso Profondissimo’ [the name of my EP] is a spin on the term ‘Basso Profondo’ which is the very low voice in the classical choir, below ‘Bass’.

 

‘Profondissimo’ is ‘even more profound’ – and also can be construed as even deeper that ‘Profondo’.

 

My music was all conceived and executed on bass guitar – hence the reference.

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Tell us your source of inspiration.

I’ve been musically inspired since I was a kid; listening to classical music, then jazz, then world music.

 

Any music that resonates… can inspire or take me to a place that gets my juices flowing.

 

Sometimes any sound I hear in the world can inspire, from birds to chain saws to voices.

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Elaborate more on the recording of this song.

Initially ‘Calango Reco’ was multi-tracked bass guitars with some percussion samples – I was inspired by a percussion sample I started using on the track – the Reco-Reco [Brazilian instrument].

 

It sounded like a whispered vocal part to me. I got the amazing Costa Rican singer, Michelle Gonzalez, in the studio to sing the vocal parts I had in my head.

 

She went on to improvise over the top of piece I’d created, multiple times.

 

From her improvisations I edited melodies and parts.

 

The piece was mixed by renowned mixer Rich Breen.

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Tell us your future projects.

I am working on a follow up to Basso Profondissimo, again mostly multi tracked or solo bass guitars [at this point] but I hope to have some guests help out as the project progresses.

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List the names of those that have supported you so far.

So far, it’s been mostly friends, music colleagues and folks from the movie world.

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Tell us your point of view on vocal tuning.

It’s a fine line between good and crap.

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Tell us your viewpoint on comparing music career to non-music career.

Sort of depends on one’s expectations. Making money /a living from music can be challenging and frustrating.

 

Most often compromises have to be made, either in the music one has to play or the realistic goals one has.

 

At this point I do not expect to get rich from my music – but in some ways that’s a blessing as I don’t have to try and please anyone but myself.

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Tell us your opinion on categorizing music into genres and sub genres.

It’s needed, but often misleading.

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State the genre you despise most with reason.

I think music in any genre can be really good or really bad.

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State the title of the song and the meaning.

‘Calango Reco’ – from the Reco Reco, (a Brazilian percussion instrument like a guiro),

 

‘Calango’ refers to a Brazilian folk music. A percussion sample I used, that inspired the vocal elements in the song was called ‘Calango Reco Reco’

 

Mobile Version

Evan at Studio Pros - Ellen When She Smiled

Evan at Studio Pros

 

 

 

 

 

Evan at Studio Pros - Ellen When She Smiled

Evan at Studio Pros – Ellen When She Smiled

 

 

 

 

ARTIST NAME: Evan at Studio Pros

 

SONG TITLE: Ellen When She Smiled

 

Music by John Dusenberry and Allan Provost

 

RELEASE DATE: 9/14/2017

 

GENRE: Jazz/Pop/Soul

 

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Discuss your past.

I was born in New York City, and raised in Huntington Station on the north shore of Long Island. I began my musical life as a trombone player in the award-winning Walt Whitman high school jazz band led by pioneer jazz educator Clem DeRosa. Highlights include broadcasting on Voice of America, playing at Leonard Bernstein’s home in Fairfield Connecticut, appearances on national television, and performing with guest soloists such as Phil Woods, Urbie Green, and Marion McPartland.

 

After graduating from Lehigh University, I studied trombone at the Navy School of Music with trombone virtuoso Tom Ervin; and after leaving the Navy I studied with Ned Meredith of the San Francisco Symphony. A growing interest in composition led me to study counterpoint privately with Will Johnson (Princeton, Cal Berkeley); and after settling in the Los Angeles area, music composition with Morten Lauridsen, Robert Linn, James Hopkins, and Anthony Vazzana at USC, and film scoring with Don Ray at UCLA.

 

Shortly after this composition training I wrote a song that was performed by a singer/guitar player who had worked a great deal in Las Vegas.  Hearing him sing it opened a new area I hadn’t thought of – songwriting. Since then I’ve been writing both songs and instrumental music evenings and weekends, while working in the computer and computer game field.

 

The very positive response to my songs, as well as to my instrumental music, has been rewarding and encouraging. So, I continue to write.

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Discuss music royalties and how to get paid.

I receive payments from TuneCore for sales and from ASCAP for radio play and other public performances.

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List the names of your biggest supporters.

Award winning computer game composer Garry Schyman is a great supporter of my music.  He especially likes this song, “Ellen When She Smiled”, and another as well – “Green”…

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Explain what has motivated you so far in your music career.

It’s pretty simple: I love music, and I find a great deal of satisfaction creating new music.

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Discuss your experience as an artist.

Briefly though, I started as a trombone player in an award winning jazz band, and went on to study music composition at USC. Since then I’ve been writing both instrumental music and songs.

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Tell us the biggest mistake you have ever made in your music career.

Working outside the music world and it took me away from personal contacts with people in the industry.

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Discuss the story behind the song.

Lyricist Allan Provost sent me the lyric. He wanted a specific name in the song, but couldn’t decide which two-syllable name to use. I said, how about my fiancé’s name, Ellen? She has a beautiful smile. So, Ellen it became.

 

We were both very happy with the version Evan did at Studio Pros, as well as the piano work by Mark (who had been playing for Aretha Franklin, when she didn’t do her own piano playing).

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Tell us the greatest piece of advice someone has given you as an artist.

Be yourself – write from your experiences and your feelings.

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Tell us what you will improve or change in your music.

Lyrics in this song are by Allan Provost. I also write lyrics, and in this area I always want to avoid clichés. It’s not something I tend to write, but it’s something I never want to write.

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List your best artists with reasons.

Michael Buble – great sound, and rhythmic phrasing a la Sinatra.

 

Paul McCartney – great melodies, great lyrics, great voice – innovative.

 

Lady Gaga – her voice, and ability to sing big production uptempo, as well as intimate introspective songs.

 

Aretha Franklin – voice, phrasing, rhythm, soul – she had it all.

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Discuss your existence as an artist.

My goal is to write music and songs that mean something to people – Something good to leave behind.

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Tell us the greatest problem you think is facing the society and the solution.

Entrenched sides in politics and society as a whole. More kindness, and more use of reason are needed most of all.

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Discuss your songwriting and recording.

I write most days – it’s just what I do and who I am. I don’t think about it ahead of time – I just do it. I’m more intuitive about my music, even though I can be analytical.

 

After some years I was able to find a first-rate recording studio – StudioPros.

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State your artist’s name and elaborate on it.

As the writer, my name is my own.

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State the title of the song and the meaning.

Ellen When She Smiled – It could be a song about someone who has passed away, or someone who is still alive, but gone from the singer’s life for some undisclosed reason.

 

Mobile Version

Sweet Lu Olutosin + Donald Brown - I Love you More than you'll ever know

Sweet Lu Olutosin

 

 

 

 

 

Sweet Lu Olutosin + Donald Brown - I Love you More than you'll ever know

Sweet Lu Olutosin + Donald Brown – I Love you More than you’ll ever know

 

 

 

 

Sweet Lu Olutosin + Donald Brown – I Love you More than you’ll ever know

 

With a Billboard #1 Traditional Jazz album to his credit and a mission to Rejuvenate the Souls of audiences everywhere, Sweet Lu Olutosin continues to shine the light of his “Spirit Music” around the world!

 

Whether it’s headlining at the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C, playing the Teatro Rendano in Consenza, Italy, or playing Jazz festivals in Atlanta, GA, Lu’s performances are life changing. Sweet Lu believes it is his duty, his mission to share his God given talent with the world; to use the idioms of jazz, blues, and gospel to share the spiritual healing and love this music, his music, imbues. He feels ‘mission accomplished’ after many of his shows when members of the audience come to him and say things like “…your music warmed my heart” or “I can feel the emotions in your voice” or, the big one, …” your music made me cry”.

 

As a youngster Lu’s goal was to be an uninhibited singer using a mix of jazz, blues, and gospel to create music with the message of soulful, spiritual healing. This goal remains as Lu channels everything from Al Jarreau, Joe Williams, Lou Rawls, Eddie Jefferson, and John Lee Hooker in his performances creating his own unique vocal style.

 

This musical odyssey did not take the expected route, however; instead, his trek detoured with a 35-year stint in the US armed forces. Lu’s years in the military taught him the very important lessons of discipline, order, method and ultimately, belief in himself. Lu recently retired from the Army with the rank of full Colonel.

 

“Olutosin is masterful, filled with ideas within his phrasing, and deeply rooted in blues. The soulfulness of his well-rounded masculine voice is a beacon in the male jazz vocal idiom. One voice I hope to hear for many years”

~ H. Williams, JazzTimes

 

 

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Perry Michael Allen - Club House Jam

Perry Michael Allen

Perry Michael Allen – Club House Jam

 

 

 

 

 

Perry Michael Allen - Club House Jam

Perry Michael Allen – Club House Jam

 

 

 

 

Perry Michael Allen – Club House Jam

 

Perry Michael Allen was born and raised in Memphis U.S.A., the heartland of Soul. Allen’s’ musical roots run deep into the contemporary music marketplace. His father Perry Allen, an educator and Memphis’ foremost jazz radio disc-jockey, left a lasting impression on the young and talented musician.

 

During high school, Allen was awarded the unique opportunity to study the art of record making with some of Memphis’ greatest session musicians. Under the wings of master producer “Papa” Willie Mitchell and Stax hit writer David Porter (of “Soul Man” fame). Allen sharpened his songwriting and production skills and later became an artist/writer and arranger for both Stax Records and the legendary Hi Records where he worked for many years with Mitchell and soul legend Al Green, during their chart-topping careers.

 

Since then, Master Perry Michael Allen has collaborated on numerous successful and famous albums. Berklee College of Music has recognized Perry Michael Allen as a Music Production Specialist.

 

As a composer and arranger, “Session-Man” Allen has received many awards including RIAA Certified Gold and Platinum Albums and the coveted Memphis Blues Foundation “Blue Note Award”. His songs and tracks are also licensed to many movies and TV shows. Some are: “C.S.I.” -“Dr. House MD” -“JAG”, “Ally McBeal”, and for movies “Pulp Fiction”, “Munich”, Mickey Blue Eyes and many more.

 

In addition to his own records for Stax, Hi and other record companies, Allen penned three hits for Al Green; “Hanging On”, “So Good To Be Here” and “Soon As I Get Home” as well as recording and arranging for other well-knowns such as Bozz Skaggs, The Sweet Inspirations, Albert King, Wilson Pickett, Anita Ward, The Memphis Horns, Bobby Rush, The Soul Children, Syl Johnson, European groups “Wet Wet Wet”, Axelle Red and others.

 

During his first term at Stax Records, he recorded “The Sweet Inspirations”, the legendary backup singers of Aretha Franklin and Elvis Presley and also recorded David Porter’s album “Sweat and Love”, accompanying Porter at the famous WattStax concert which was the subject of the groundbreaking film of the same name. He later was songwriter/arranger/vocalist with the Stax/Fantasy records group “KILO”.

 

During his early years at Hi Records Allen made many recordings with The Hi Rhythm Section and worked for years alongside Mitchell and the legend of soul Al Green co-writing, arranging and appearing with Al Green as musical director in Las Vegas, on Broadway and a host of theatres and television programs including The Tonight Show, The Late Show, Soul Train and The Midnight Special.

 

Allen also worked on projects at Fame Records (Muscle Shoals) with writer George Jackson and performed as keyboardist/ vocalist on Anita Ward’s “Ring My Bell” tour. Allen later was called to work as producer/arranger/musician for Willie Mitchells’ new record label “Waylo”. For the Waylo label, he arranged and recorded the works of Al Green (He Is The Light) “Lynn White”, “Lanier &Co.”, the European group “Wet Wet Wet” (The Memphis Sessions), David Hudson’s album “Night & Day” and others as well as his own singles “Music All The Time”, “Turn On The Music”, “Ooo Wee” and “Highway”.

 

Perry Michael arrived in Europe for the first time touring as music director and road manager for superstar and friend Al Green. Later that year, he decided to return to Europe. Since moving there he has written, produced and recorded his own work, including the CD “Deep Inside” for Irma Molto Jazz, and “On The Radio”, “Push Push Push” and other singles for Tabloid/Polygram. Working with acclaimed house producer Gianni Bini, Allen released several mixes including “Ride” and “Back To My Roots”. Also during this time, his “Simple Things” EP was the first release for his independent label Nugen Music. The single “Club House Jam” is the second and precedes the album “Tracks Vol. 1”. The Album “Now and Then” will be released in 2019.

 

Allen is now a major contributor to the revival of Soul Music in Europe where he now lives and has reunited and worked with many friends and mentors including Isaac Hayes, The Blues Brothers, Solomon Burke, Booker T., and the MGs, the late great Rufus Thomas and countless others.

 

Adding to an ongoing career Allen now offers “Session Man” courses and music production counseling to emerging artists/musicians, European music institutes and recording studios.

 

When asked why he wanted to offer his courses, Allen replied:

“I was lucky to be inspired by great artists and producers and to have them as mentors. I want to convey inspiration and knowledge to musicians and artists who feel they are “on the outside looking in”. For me, there is nothing more rewarding than the feeling that you get when someone tells you that their success is due to what they learned from you and the things you’ve been able to convey to them”.

 

– Italian Journalist – Massimilliano Buonamici.

 

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Ronald Simone

Ronald Simone

 

 

 

Ronald Simone

Ronald Simone

 

 

 

Ronald Simone

 

Discuss your music career.

This project started in 2013, with my first EP “Watching The Stars”. It all began when I included Sinatra songs in my live set, and was overwhelmed with the audience response, although I know I don’t sound anything like him, I just couldn’t resist writing some songs in that style. Stuart of One Night Stand Music said of “How Are You Today” – Once more another outstanding track, please keep sharing your music with us”.

 

 

This encouragement gave me the confidence to continue, so I hired a new arranger and a new producer who were willing to help me experiment with the sound.

 

 

In the second EP “Swing Sensation” you can hear that start to happen, but as the lyric states at the end of verse two of “Win Win Win” This race is sealed and signed.

 

 

“Win Win Win” is my third EP and I’m certain that we now have the musical signature that is Ronald Simone, which is epitomised in the title track. The lush backing vocals blended with a jazz pop vibe make listeners sit up and take notice and the excitement is tangible. I signed my first contract with Joey Welz of Canadian American Records in 2013 and have since had interest from several sync licensing companies, but it’s this EP that’s ready for radio. The Next EP Coming Soon is “Time”.

 

 

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Dark Dreams – Mickey Curry & Todd Curry

Todd Curry

 

Todd A Curry “The Toad” SINGER/SONG WRITER

 

Todd considers himself to be an “Okay Singer, moderately cool sax and flute player, a song writer, a published author, pretty scary pilot, and a damn good looking man”. What he actually is- is a highly decorated retired Police Detective Sargent who’s list of accomplishments far surpass many who were in his line of work. Some of the positions he gained expertise status and notoriety was as a Police patrol dog handler, Covert Narcotics investigator, Anti-terrorism investigator, Criminal Analyst and instructor.

 

He began playing the sax and flute when he was 10 and stopped playing after graduating high school. He then joined the service and spent 10 years working undercover narcotics with the Military Police Corp. and Criminal Investigations Division (CID). He left the service and became a cop, retiring in 2006. It was not until 2014 that he decided to get back into music. It’s ironic and hard to believe that after a 37 year hiatus from music, he has easily managed to jump back into it.

 

Todd is only interested in writing and playing his own music. His songs vary in genre which is unique in it of itself. He has often said; “I’m not looking to write a #1 hit. I’m simply documenting my life story though music. You’re either gonna like them or not. My only intent is to get one of these songs put in a commercial or movie or sold to a ‘True’ artist who can take them to another level. It’s not about money; it’s about being remembered after I’m gone….what better Way to be remembered”.

 

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Charlie H Russell

 

 

Charlie H Russell

Charlie H Russell

 

 

 

 

Charlie H Russell

 

 

 

Charlie Russell is a self-taught musician / songwriter / arranger / producer; his recordings are intentionally melodic, giving you this highly enjoyable first look.

 

 

 

Charlie H Russell is an independent, Composer / Producer / Musician, with a catalog of 400 plus songs, that cover a wide range of emotions, styles and tempos, from jingles to cues, Swing, Big Band, Latin, Smooth Jazz, R&B, Blues, Hip Hop, Neo-Soul, Island, Cinematic, some Rock, Country and Classical.   He composes and records about two songs a week, he also creates custom pieces of music for any opportunity or client.

 

 

 

Charlie H Russell born 4/7/1956, with his infectious melodies and inventive arrangements, makes his radio friendly and artistically intriguing, Smooth Jazz, Neo-Soul sound, go-along ways towards establishing his music.

 

 

 

There are moments, of cool soulful grooves, with hip rides in jazz improvisation, and the ripping funk Bass lines, Sax and Horn lines are both, hot and cool.   A one man shop, he plays guitar, bass and keyboards, his keyboard works can make you feel so good, that he may shock you with his electrically charged guitar solos, the sax and horns lines on his recordings, are both powerful and warm. The horns lines are played on his keyboard with a Virtual Instrument patch.   Charlie’s recordings are intentionally melodic.

 

 

 

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